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I'm having a very odd problem that I'm hoping someone has come across.

class Letter
{
public:
    Letter()
    virtual ~Letter()
    virtual std::string get() const = 0;
};

class A : public Letter
{
public:
    A()
    ~A()
    virtual std::string get() const { return "A"; }
};

class Board
{
public:
   Board(){}
   ~Board()
   {
        std::cout << "Removing: " << letter->get() << std::endl;
        delete letter;
   }
   void setLetter(Letter * l) { letter = l }
private:
   Letter * letter;
}

int main()
{
    Board b;
    b.setLetter(new A());
}

The program causes a seg fault when Board goes out of scope at the line where the virtual function letter->get() is called in the destructor. I'm using gcc 4.1.2. Any ideas?

UPDATE

Okay, it seems what's actually happening in the real code is the equivalent of this:

class Board
{
public:
   Board(){}
   ~Board()
   {
       std::cout << "Removing: " << letter->get() << std::endl;
   }
   void setLetter(Letter * l) { letter = l; }
private:
   Letter* letter;
};

int main()
{
    Board b;
    A a;
    b.setLetter(&a);

    return 0;
}

In which case A is already out of scope when the virtual function is called.

share|improve this question
1  
Does ~Letter() or ~A() do anything? –  Dave S Aug 3 '11 at 15:03
1  
Can you provide a minimal example that reproduces the fault and actually compiles? I fixed the errors in your snippet and it runs fine. –  Ferdinand Beyer Aug 3 '11 at 15:05
    
Try putting some semicolons after declarations... that might do it. –  Luchian Grigore Aug 3 '11 at 15:08
    
please copy the code which you are actually running. –  Arunmu Aug 3 '11 at 15:13
    
yeah...it runs fine on my gcc 4.5.1 too (of course with some syntactic corrections) –  mukeshkumar Aug 3 '11 at 15:13

4 Answers 4

I can only guess you're attempting to cast the std::string returned from get() to a char*. Otherwise i see no reason for the crash.

share|improve this answer
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

class Letter
{
public:
    Letter() {}
    virtual ~Letter() {}
    virtual std::string get() const = 0;
};

class A : public Letter
{
public:
    A() {}
    ~A() {}
    virtual std::string get() const { return "A"; }
};

class Board
{
public:
   Board(){}
   ~Board()
   {
        std::cout << "Removing: " << letter->get() << std::endl;
        delete letter;
   }
   void setLetter(Letter * l) { letter = l; }
private:
   Letter * letter;
};

int main()
{
    Board b;
    b.setLetter(new A());
    return 0;
}

no problem in gcc 4.5.2

share|improve this answer
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I didn't realize an object was being passed to setLetter() from the stack, so A was going out of scope before b.

Board b;
A a;
b.setLetter(&a);
share|improve this answer

Some compilers doesn't allow Plain C / C++ constructors or destructors call virtual methods, seems like the (ANSI) C++ specification neither. And its not recommended.

Sometimes that requirement is useful. Some languages like Object Pascal explicit allow virtual methods calls within constructors and destructors.

One thing you can do its use the "Fake Virtual Constructor Pattern":

class MyClass
{
  public:
    // constructor
    MyClass
    {
      // anything but virtual methods
    }

    // destructor
    ~MyClass
    {
      // anything but virtual methods
    }

    virtual void MyFakeConstructor()
    {
      MyVirtualMethod();
    }

    virtual void MyFakeDestructor()
    {
      MyVirtualMethod();
    }

    virtual void MyVirtualMethod()
    {
      // more stuff
    }

    // more members
}

int main(char[][] Args)
{
  MyClass MyObject = new MyClass();
  MyObject->MyFakeConstructor(); // <-- calls "MyVirtualMethod()"

  MyObject->DoSomething1();
  MyObject->DoSomething2();
  MyObject->DoSomething3();

  MyObject->MyFakeDestructor(); // <-- calls "MyVirtualMethod()"
  delete MyObject;

  return 0;
} // int main()

Another solution its that you arrange your code so you explicit call your virtual method outside the destructor.

Cheers.

share|improve this answer
1  
That refers to calling virtual methods of the same class. –  Luchian Grigore Aug 3 '11 at 15:18

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