Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

First off, I'm new to Ninject, but whilst this question targets Ninject, it would seem to apply to DI in general.

I think I'm missing something here. Suggested solutions so far all seem to be horribly complex.

I had something like this:

public class MyController : Controller
{
    private IMyService _Service;

    public MyController()
        :this(null)
    { }

    public MyController(IMyService service)
    {
        _Service = service ?? new MyService(ModelState);
    }
}

public IMyService
{}

public class MyService : IMyService
{
    private ModelStateDictionary _Model;

    public MyService(ModelStateDictionary model)
    {
        _Model = model;
    }
}

And so I thought I'd go Ninject on it. And came up with this:

public class MyController : Controller
{
    private IMyService _Service;

    public MyController()
        :this(null)
    {
        _Service = Locator.Kernel.Get<IMyService>(new Ninject.Parameters.ConstructorArgument("model", ModelState));
    }
}

public class MyServiceModule : NinjectModule
{
    public override Load()
    {
        Bind<IMyService>().To<MyService>(); //here
    }
}

It seems to me though, I should be able to change the bit where it binds (marked here) so it knows at that point to get the modelstate, rather than when I want an instance in the constructor, which requires advance knowledge of the concrete service class.

Am I worrying needlessly or is there a better way of doing this?

Simon

share|improve this question
    
I think when you do the Bind<IMyService>().To<MyService>(), you can append a .WithParameter(new Ninject.Parameters.ConstructorArgument()) like you have it... not sure though, as I haven't gotten there just yet with my project. –  Richard B Aug 3 '11 at 16:40
    
You should also inject IMyService into MyController via the constructor. the Ninject.Web.MVC project provides a controller factory which will allow you to do this easily. In general, if you find yourself pulling things out of the kernel manually, there might be something wrong with the design IMHO. –  Brook Aug 3 '11 at 19:49
    
That's much the same approach I took in the end. I passed the ModelState into a property after the constructor injection. –  Simon Halsey Aug 4 '11 at 9:29

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Does MyService really need a ModelStateDictionary to be constructed?

I would look towards refactoring that, so that I was passing the ModelStateDictionary into the method I was calling, rather than requiring it for construction of the Service class.

If such a refactoring is unreasonable, you will probably want to add a layer of abstraction over the ModelStateDictionary

public interface IModelStateProvider {
    ModelStateDictionary GetModelState();
}

And make an implementation of that interface that can retrieve the current context's ModelStateDictionary, then setup the binding of that interface and change your service class to take it in the constructor:

public class MyService : IMyService
{
    private ModelStateDictionary _Model;

    public MyService(IModelStateProvider modelStateProvider)
    {
        _Model = modelStateProvider.GetModelState();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
We talked through the problem a LOT yesterday. Passing ModelState is just illustrative, but it could be anything from the calling the class. Without DI, the pattern seems quite straight forward. I guess it's the cost you pay. –  Simon Halsey Aug 4 '11 at 9:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.