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I came across this snippet while going through the tutorial on how to decode a video :

private static long millisecondsUntilTimeToDisplay(IVideoPicture picture)
{
/**
 * We could just display the images as quickly as we decode them, but it turns
 * out we can decode a lot faster than you think.
 * 
 * So instead, the following code does a poor-man's version of trying to
 * match up the frame-rate requested for each IVideoPicture with the system
 * clock time on your computer.
 * 
 * Remember that all Xuggler IAudioSamples and IVideoPicture objects always
 * give timestamps in Microseconds, relative to the first decoded item.  If
 * instead you used the packet timestamps, they can be in different units depending
 * on your IContainer, and IStream and things can get hairy quickly.
 */
long millisecondsToSleep = 0;
if (mFirstVideoTimestampInStream == Global.NO_PTS)
{
  // This is our first time through
  mFirstVideoTimestampInStream = picture.getTimeStamp();
  // get the starting clock time so we can hold up frames
  // until the right time.
  mSystemVideoClockStartTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
  millisecondsToSleep = 0;
} else {
  long systemClockCurrentTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
  long millisecondsClockTimeSinceStartofVideo = systemClockCurrentTime - mSystemVideoClockStartTime;
  // compute how long for this frame since the first frame in the stream.
  // remember that IVideoPicture and IAudioSamples timestamps are always in MICROSECONDS,
  // so we divide by 1000 to get milliseconds.
  long millisecondsStreamTimeSinceStartOfVideo = (picture.getTimeStamp() - mFirstVideoTimestampInStream)/1000;
  final long millisecondsTolerance = 50; // and we give ourselfs 50 ms of tolerance
  millisecondsToSleep = (millisecondsStreamTimeSinceStartOfVideo -
      (millisecondsClockTimeSinceStartofVideo+millisecondsTolerance));
}
return millisecondsToSleep;

}

I have scratched a lot but don't understand what does this method do ? what are we returning ? And why we are making the thread to sleep after the method returns ( what is the purpose of the method ?)

This is the complete code in the link :

import javax.sound.sampled.AudioFormat;
import javax.sound.sampled.AudioSystem;
import javax.sound.sampled.DataLine;
import javax.sound.sampled.LineUnavailableException;
import javax.sound.sampled.SourceDataLine;
import com.xuggle.xuggler.demos.*;
import com.xuggle.xuggler.Global;
import com.xuggle.xuggler.IAudioSamples;
import com.xuggle.xuggler.IContainer;
import com.xuggle.xuggler.IPacket;
import com.xuggle.xuggler.IPixelFormat;
import com.xuggle.xuggler.IStream;
import com.xuggle.xuggler.IStreamCoder;
import com.xuggle.xuggler.ICodec;
import com.xuggle.xuggler.IVideoPicture;
import com.xuggle.xuggler.IVideoResampler;
import com.xuggle.xuggler.Utils;

public class DecodeAndPlayAudioAndVideo
{

/**
 * The audio line we'll output sound to; it'll be the default audio device on your      system if available
*/
private static SourceDataLine mLine;

/**
 * The window we'll draw the video on.
 * 
 */
 private static VideoImage mScreen = null;

 private static long mSystemVideoClockStartTime;

 private static long mFirstVideoTimestampInStream;

 /**
  * Takes a media container (file) as the first argument, opens it,
  * plays audio as quickly as it can, and opens up a Swing window and displays
  * video frames with <i>roughly</i> the right timing.
  *  
  * @param args Must contain one string which represents a filename
  */
  @SuppressWarnings("deprecation")
  public static void main(String[] args)
  {
if (args.length <= 0)
  throw new IllegalArgumentException("must pass in a filename as the first argument");

String filename = args[0];

// Let's make sure that we can actually convert video pixel formats.
if (!IVideoResampler.isSupported(IVideoResampler.Feature.FEATURE_COLORSPACECONVERSION))
  throw new RuntimeException("you must install the GPL version of Xuggler (with IVideoResampler support) for this demo to work");

// Create a Xuggler container object
IContainer container = IContainer.make();

// Open up the container
if (container.open(filename, IContainer.Type.READ, null) < 0)
  throw new IllegalArgumentException("could not open file: " + filename);

// query how many streams the call to open found
int numStreams = container.getNumStreams();

// and iterate through the streams to find the first audio stream
int videoStreamId = -1;
IStreamCoder videoCoder = null;
int audioStreamId = -1;
IStreamCoder audioCoder = null;
for(int i = 0; i < numStreams; i++)
{
  // Find the stream object
  IStream stream = container.getStream(i);
  // Get the pre-configured decoder that can decode this stream;
  IStreamCoder coder = stream.getStreamCoder();

  if (videoStreamId == -1 && coder.getCodecType() == ICodec.Type.CODEC_TYPE_VIDEO)
  {
    videoStreamId = i;
    videoCoder = coder;
  }
  else if (audioStreamId == -1 && coder.getCodecType() == ICodec.Type.CODEC_TYPE_AUDIO)
  {
    audioStreamId = i;
    audioCoder = coder;
  }
}
if (videoStreamId == -1 && audioStreamId == -1)
  throw new RuntimeException("could not find audio or video stream in container: "+filename);

/*
 * Check if we have a video stream in this file.  If so let's open up our decoder so it can
 * do work.
 */
IVideoResampler resampler = null;
if (videoCoder != null)
{
  if(videoCoder.open() < 0)
    throw new RuntimeException("could not open audio decoder for container: "+filename);

  if (videoCoder.getPixelType() != IPixelFormat.Type.BGR24)
  {
    // if this stream is not in BGR24, we're going to need to
    // convert it.  The VideoResampler does that for us.
    resampler = IVideoResampler.make(videoCoder.getWidth(), videoCoder.getHeight(), IPixelFormat.Type.BGR24,
        videoCoder.getWidth(), videoCoder.getHeight(), videoCoder.getPixelType());
    if (resampler == null)
      throw new RuntimeException("could not create color space resampler for: " + filename);
  }
  /*
   * And once we have that, we draw a window on screen
   */
  openJavaVideo();
}

if (audioCoder != null)
{
  if (audioCoder.open() < 0)
    throw new RuntimeException("could not open audio decoder for container: "+filename);

  /*
   * And once we have that, we ask the Java Sound System to get itself ready.
   */
  try
  {
    openJavaSound(audioCoder);
  }
  catch (LineUnavailableException ex)
  {
    throw new RuntimeException("unable to open sound device on your system when playing back container: "+filename);
  }
}


/*
 * Now, we start walking through the container looking at each packet.
 */
IPacket packet = IPacket.make();
mFirstVideoTimestampInStream = Global.NO_PTS;
mSystemVideoClockStartTime = 0;
while(container.readNextPacket(packet) >= 0)
{
  /*
   * Now we have a packet, let's see if it belongs to our video stream
   */
  if (packet.getStreamIndex() == videoStreamId)
  {
    /*
     * We allocate a new picture to get the data out of Xuggler
     */
    IVideoPicture picture = IVideoPicture.make(videoCoder.getPixelType(),
        videoCoder.getWidth(), videoCoder.getHeight());

    /*
     * Now, we decode the video, checking for any errors.
     * 
     */
    int bytesDecoded = videoCoder.decodeVideo(picture, packet, 0);
    if (bytesDecoded < 0)
      throw new RuntimeException("got error decoding audio in: " + filename);

    /*
     * Some decoders will consume data in a packet, but will not be able to construct
     * a full video picture yet.  Therefore you should always check if you
     * got a complete picture from the decoder
     */
    if (picture.isComplete())
    {
      IVideoPicture newPic = picture;
      /*
       * If the resampler is not null, that means we didn't get the video in BGR24 format and
       * need to convert it into BGR24 format.
       */
      if (resampler != null)
      {
        // we must resample
        newPic = IVideoPicture.make(resampler.getOutputPixelFormat(), picture.getWidth(), picture.getHeight());
        if (resampler.resample(newPic, picture) < 0)
          throw new RuntimeException("could not resample video from: " + filename);
      }
      if (newPic.getPixelType() != IPixelFormat.Type.BGR24)
        throw new RuntimeException("could not decode video as BGR 24 bit data in: " + filename);

      long delay = millisecondsUntilTimeToDisplay(newPic);
      // if there is no audio stream; go ahead and hold up the main thread.  We'll end
      // up caching fewer video pictures in memory that way.
      try
      {
        if (delay > 0)
          Thread.sleep(delay);
      }
      catch (InterruptedException e)
      {
        return;
      }

      // And finally, convert the picture to an image and display it

      mScreen.setImage(Utils.videoPictureToImage(newPic));
    }
  }
  else if (packet.getStreamIndex() == audioStreamId)
  {
    /*
     * We allocate a set of samples with the same number of channels as the
     * coder tells us is in this buffer.
     * 
     * We also pass in a buffer size (1024 in our example), although Xuggler
     * will probably allocate more space than just the 1024 (it's not important why).
     */
    IAudioSamples samples = IAudioSamples.make(1024, audioCoder.getChannels());

    /*
     * A packet can actually contain multiple sets of samples (or frames of samples
     * in audio-decoding speak).  So, we may need to call decode audio multiple
     * times at different offsets in the packet's data.  We capture that here.
     */
    int offset = 0;

    /*
     * Keep going until we've processed all data
     */
    while(offset < packet.getSize())
    {
      int bytesDecoded = audioCoder.decodeAudio(samples, packet, offset);
      if (bytesDecoded < 0)
        throw new RuntimeException("got error decoding audio in: " + filename);
      offset += bytesDecoded;
      /*
       * Some decoder will consume data in a packet, but will not be able to construct
       * a full set of samples yet.  Therefore you should always check if you
       * got a complete set of samples from the decoder
       */
      if (samples.isComplete())
      {
        // note: this call will block if Java's sound buffers fill up, and we're
        // okay with that.  That's why we have the video "sleeping" occur
        // on another thread.
        playJavaSound(samples);
      }
    }
  }
  else
  {
    /*
     * This packet isn't part of our video stream, so we just silently drop it.
     */
    do {} while(false);
  }

}
/*
 * Technically since we're exiting anyway, these will be cleaned up by 
 * the garbage collector... but because we're nice people and want
 * to be invited places for Christmas, we're going to show how to clean up.
 */
if (videoCoder != null)
{
  videoCoder.close();
  videoCoder = null;
}
if (audioCoder != null)
{
  audioCoder.close();
  audioCoder = null;
}
if (container !=null)
{
  container.close();
  container = null;
}
closeJavaSound();
closeJavaVideo();

} What does The following method do ?

private static long millisecondsUntilTimeToDisplay(IVideoPicture picture)
{
/**
 * We could just display the images as quickly as we decode them, but it turns
 * out we can decode a lot faster than you think.
 * 
 * So instead, the following code does a poor-man's version of trying to
 * match up the frame-rate requested for each IVideoPicture with the system
 * clock time on your computer.
 * 
 * Remember that all Xuggler IAudioSamples and IVideoPicture objects always
 * give timestamps in Microseconds, relative to the first decoded item.  If
 * instead you used the packet timestamps, they can be in different units depending
 * on your IContainer, and IStream and things can get hairy quickly.
 */
long millisecondsToSleep = 0;
if (mFirstVideoTimestampInStream == Global.NO_PTS)
{
  // This is our first time through
  mFirstVideoTimestampInStream = picture.getTimeStamp();
  // get the starting clock time so we can hold up frames
  // until the right time.
  mSystemVideoClockStartTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
  millisecondsToSleep = 0;
} else {
  long systemClockCurrentTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
  long millisecondsClockTimeSinceStartofVideo = systemClockCurrentTime - mSystemVideoClockStartTime;
  // compute how long for this frame since the first frame in the stream.
  // remember that IVideoPicture and IAudioSamples timestamps are always in MICROSECONDS,
  // so we divide by 1000 to get milliseconds.
  long millisecondsStreamTimeSinceStartOfVideo = (picture.getTimeStamp() - mFirstVideoTimestampInStream)/1000;
  final long millisecondsTolerance = 50; // and we give ourselfs 50 ms of tolerance
  millisecondsToSleep = (millisecondsStreamTimeSinceStartOfVideo -
      (millisecondsClockTimeSinceStartofVideo+millisecondsTolerance));
}
return millisecondsToSleep;

}

/**
 * Opens a Swing window on screen.
 */
 private static void openJavaVideo()
 {
  mScreen = new VideoImage();
 }

 /**
  * Forces the swing thread to terminate; I'm sure there is a right
  * way to do this in swing, but this works too.
  */
  private static void closeJavaVideo()
  {
     System.exit(0);
  }

  private static void openJavaSound(IStreamCoder aAudioCoder) throws     LineUnavailableException
  {
   AudioFormat audioFormat = new AudioFormat(aAudioCoder.getSampleRate(),
     (int)IAudioSamples.findSampleBitDepth(aAudioCoder.getSampleFormat()),
     aAudioCoder.getChannels(),
     true, /* xuggler defaults to signed 16 bit samples */
     false);
   DataLine.Info info = new DataLine.Info(SourceDataLine.class, audioFormat);
   mLine = (SourceDataLine) AudioSystem.getLine(info);
   /**
    * if that succeeded, try opening the line.
    */
    mLine.open(audioFormat);
    /**
     * And if that succeed, start the line.
     */
     mLine.start();   
   }

  private static void playJavaSound(IAudioSamples aSamples)
  {
   /**
    * We're just going to dump all the samples into the line.
    */
    byte[] rawBytes = aSamples.getData().getByteArray(0, aSamples.getSize());
    mLine.write(rawBytes, 0, aSamples.getSize());
  }

  private static void closeJavaSound()
  {
   if (mLine != null)
  {
    /*
     * Wait for the line to finish playing
     */
     mLine.drain();
     /*
      * Close the line.
      */
      mLine.close();
      mLine=null;
     }
    }
 }
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

Rough algorithm in pseudocode:

Is this the first frame?
  > Yes, save the frame time and the current time.

  > No, do the following:
    See how much time has passed since the first frame was displayed in System Time
    See the difference in time between the current frame and the first frame

    If there is a discrepancy
      >Return a number of milliseconds to sleep for, else return 0.

So, what you then get is the overall algorithm of:

Decode frame
Check if we need to delay the frame (the method in question)
Delay
Display frame

In this way, the program will never display frames faster than the variable frame rate declared by the video. The method in question maintains the state of previous frame times and calculates how long to sleep for.

EDIT: The delay is needed because you can decode frames (much!) faster than the video's frame rate. Let's say you have a fairly slow machine running this program, and it takes 10ms to decode a frame. Let's also say that you have video that has a variable frame rate, but is roughly 10 frames per second (or 100ms per frame). Now if you take this step out of our 'overall algorithm':

Decode frame (10ms)
Display frame (1ms)
Decode frame (10ms)
Display frame (1ms)

If this was happening you would find 1 frame displayed every 10ms, meaning that the video will be displayed at 100 frames per second, which is wrong!

EDIT2: I guess what you're asking is why don't we do this?

Decode frame
Frame Delta = Current Frame Time - Previous Frame Time
Delay (for Delta milliseconds)
Display frame

The problem with this is what happens if it takes a long time to decode or display a frame? This would cause the frame rate to be significantly slower than the frame rate in the file.

Instead, this algorithm syncs the first frame to the system time, then does a little bit of extra calculation:

long systemTimeChange = currentSystemTime - firstFrameSystemTime;
long frameTimeChange = currentFrameTime - firstFrameTime;

// Subtract the time elapsed.
long differenceInChanges = frameTimeChange - systemTimeChange;
if(differenceInChanges > 0) {
  // It was faster to decode than the frame rate!
  Thread.sleep(differenceInChanges);
}
share|improve this answer
    
that is ok.But can you please explain why would the discrepancy occur ? What is the need of recording system time ? Please elaborate this in your answer –  saplingPro Aug 3 '11 at 17:40
    
I have edited my answer. Effectively, the delay is to prevent you displaying frames at the decoding rate, which is usually faster than the frame rate. –  Bringer128 Aug 4 '11 at 3:19
    
and why do we need to record system time ? How does that help ? –  saplingPro Aug 4 '11 at 6:51
    
I've addressed your comment under EDIT2. The system time is used to synchronise the video play speed. –  Bringer128 Aug 4 '11 at 8:05
    
thank you i have the right feeling now ! –  saplingPro Aug 4 '11 at 9:58

system time actually denotes the time at which the particular frame has been decoded and the frameTimeroughly denotes the frame rate the video has. So the difference goes like this : discrepancy = frameRate - decodeRate + tolerance Tolerance may be useful when decoding video takes larger time than it takes or the media takes longer time to display . Here is what you get from the difference :

enter image description here

Since decoding is too fast compared to the frame rate of video we have to wait some time and won't display that frame right now. And we use systemTimeStamp to sync our frames and hold it till the right time. In the above picture you see how fast the decoding rate is but frame rate is slow compared to the decoding rate.

share|improve this answer
    
good Explaination ! thank you –  saplingPro Aug 4 '11 at 9:59

seems like this:

 * So instead, the following code does a poor-man's version of trying to
 * match up the frame-rate requested for each IVideoPicture with the system
 * clock time on your computer.

the delay is to try to match the framerate.

share|improve this answer
2  
How does it try to match the frame rate ? That is the question. –  saplingPro Aug 3 '11 at 15:59

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