Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Why is this right ?

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
    char *s="raman";
    char *t="rawan";
    s=t;
    cout<<s;

return 0;
}

But this is wrong?

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
    char s[]="raman";
    char t[]="rawan";
    s=t;
    cout<<s;

return 0;
}
share|improve this question
14  
Define "right" and "wrong". –  Michael Todd Aug 3 '11 at 17:50
3  
You can not assign an array after initialization but you can assign a pointer. –  Joe Aug 3 '11 at 17:51
4  
The first is not right — string literals are const char*, not char*. Assigning them to char* is dangerous. –  Cat Plus Plus Aug 3 '11 at 18:07
1  
Save yourself a lot of potential headaches and use std::string. It exists for good reasons. –  hammar Aug 3 '11 at 18:19
2  
@Cat Plus Plus: No, string literals are const char[N], where N is the length of the literal plus 1 (to allow for the terminating '\0'). In most contexts, though, they decay to const char*, with the value being a pointer to the string's first character. For example, sizeof "hello, world" yields 13, not the size of a pointer. –  Keith Thompson Aug 3 '11 at 18:23
show 8 more comments

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The first example assigns an pointer to another which is valid.

The second example assigns an array to another array which in not allowed in C & C++ both.


This excellent C++ FAQ entry and this answer should be a good read for you.

share|improve this answer
add comment

In the first example, s=t does a pointer assignment. In the second, s=t tries to assign a pointer value (resulting from the implicit conversion, or "decay", of the array expression t) to an array object. C++ doesn't permit array assignments.

C and C++ happen to be very similar in this area; section 6 of the comp.lang.c FAQ covers the relationship between arrays and pointers very well.

share|improve this answer
    
Just an FYI: I meant to decline your last flag (the one that says an answer is deliberately deceptive), but I accidentally marked it helpful. Flags should not be used to indicate technical inaccuracies, or an altogether wrong answer. –  NullUserException Dec 8 '11 at 0:06
    
@NullUserException: Understood, thanks for the notice. I think the situation has been resolved anyway. You can delete your comment if you like. –  Keith Thompson Dec 9 '11 at 9:03
add comment

In addition to what the other guys said:

Contrary to popular belief, arrays are actually not pointers. They just share a lot of similarities when working with them and have a couple of implicit conversions to pointers which is why it's easy to work with them as if they are pointers.

Arrays are a standalone feature of (C and) C++. It doesn't behave exactly like a pointer would.

For example, it's possible to allocate array objects on the stack, which is not possible when you allocate objects using new (which returns a pointer) and pointers.

And the example that you showed is another one: You can't use arrays as if they are pointers. But you can use pointers to point to a continuous piece of memory (array).

share|improve this answer
add comment

Array name is a const pointer. meaning, when you declare an array, the name is a pointer, which cannot be altered.

share|improve this answer
add comment

char *s means:
address and value both are not constant.

const char *s:

value is constant, not address.

const char * const s;

address and value both are constant.

char *s[] 

is an array. Array base address is always contant. You can not change the base address of it, that is not allowed in c.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.