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I have created a converter class that uses the IValueConverter interface and InConverter. It is bound to a DataGrid and it is passed an array of strings in which it determines if the value is in the array.

[ValueConversion(typeof(int), typeof(bool))]
public class InConverter : IValueConverter
{
    public object Convert(object value, Type type, object parameter, CultureInfo info)
    {
        String str = value as String;
        String[] compareList = parameter as String[];
        if (str != null)
        {
            foreach (String compare in compareList)
            {
                if (str == compare)
                    return true;
            }
        }
        return false;
    }

    public object ConvertBack(object value, Type type, object parameter, CultureInfo info)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

I also have a conveter class called NotItConverter which essentially returns the opposite of InConverter and I didn't want to have to have redundant code. So, I pictured doing this.

[ValueConversion(typeof(int), typeof(bool))]
public class NotInConverter : InConverter
{
    public object Convert(object value, Type type, object parameter, CultureInfo info)
    {
        return !(Boolean)base.Convert(value, type, parameter, info);
    }

    public object ConvertBack(object value, Type type, object parameter, CultureInfo info)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

This doesn't work though. The only way to get it to complile without warning is to make the methods in NotInConverter specify override and the methods in InConverter specify virtual. Is there not an easier way to accomplish this?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think it's a combination of both suggestions:

public class NotInConverter : InConverter, IValueConverter
{
  new public object Convert(...)
  {
    return !base.Convert(...);
  }

  new public object ConvertBack(...)
  {
    return !base.ConvertBack(...);
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That works, thank you. –  WPFNewbie Aug 3 '11 at 19:40
    
Is it wrong to declare Convert as virtual in the base class, then override in the derived class and not reimplement the interface? –  WPFNewbie Aug 3 '11 at 19:41
    
That will also work. It's your choice. –  SLaks Aug 3 '11 at 19:45
    
I wouldn't say it's wrong, just a different way of doing it; it seems that in this scenario overriding makes more sense over hiding/re-implementing the interface. –  sellmeadog Aug 3 '11 at 19:48

You need to re-specify the interface in the derived class:

public class NotInConverter : InConverter, IValueConverter

This will cause the compiler to create separate interface mappings for the derived class

Proof:

static void Main()
{
    ITest x = new TestDerived();
    x.Name();
}

interface ITest {
    void Name();
}

class TestBase : ITest {
    public void Name() { Console.WriteLine("Base"); }
}
class TestDerived : TestBase, ITest {
    public void Name() { Console.WriteLine("Derived"); }
}

This prints Derived.

share|improve this answer
2  
@vcs: Wrong. See my proof –  SLaks Aug 3 '11 at 19:26
    
@vcs: SLaks is right. Restating interface implementation again creates new interface mapping, thus when someone asks for IValueConverter from NotInConverter - he gets new method. Just hiding really will change nothing. –  Ivan Danilov Aug 3 '11 at 19:29
    
Hm, wasn't aware of that behavior. +1 then. –  vcsjones Aug 3 '11 at 19:30
1  
With the above scenario you still get the warning about hiding, using the new keyword as in the other answer removes this warning. –  WPFNewbie Aug 3 '11 at 19:40
    
You're right; I forgot about that. (I tested in LINQPad, which doesn't show warnings) –  SLaks Aug 3 '11 at 19:43

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