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Our code (in a simple library implementation) is beginning to look like this:

err = callToUnderlyingLibrary1();
if (err!=0) {
printf ("blah %d\n", err);
...
}

err = callToUnderlyingLibrary2();
if (err!=0) {
printf ("blah %d\n", err);
...
}

err = callToUnderlyingLibrary3();
if (err!=0) {
printf ("blah %d\n", err);
...
}

This is cumbersome and ugly. Is there a better way to do this ? Perhaps using the C preprocessor ? I was thinking something like:

CHECK callToUnderlyingLibrary1();
CHECK callToUnderlyingLibrary2();
CHECK callToUnderlyingLibrary3();

where the CHECK macro invokes the function and does the rudimentary error checking.

Are there preferred idiomatic ways of handling this ?

share|improve this question
7  
You should probably pick either C or C++, not both. In C++, the canonical answer will involve exceptions. In C, it will not. –  Oliver Charlesworth Aug 3 '11 at 19:54
    
Good idea. Let me remove the C++ tag. –  Ren Aug 3 '11 at 19:56
    
I wish I could give more UP votes!!! –  hari Aug 3 '11 at 20:00
    
As you originally tagged it C and C++, is it a fair assumption that this involves a C library being invoked from C++ code?? –  Roddy Aug 3 '11 at 20:05
1  
+ 1 for wanting a better way to do this :) –  Mouna Cheikhna Aug 4 '11 at 8:51

7 Answers 7

Usually, in C, one uses goto for error handling:

int foo()
{
    if (Function1() == ERROR_CODE) goto error;
    ...
    struct bar *x = acquire_structure;
    ...
    if (Function2() == ERROR_CODE) goto error0;
    ...

    release_structure(x);
    return 0;

error0:
    release_structure(x);

error:
    return -1;
}

This can be improved with macros and more clever instruction flow (to avoid repeating cleanup code), but I hope you see the point.

share|improve this answer
3  
Gotos in Macros :-) Thanks for reminding me why I program in C++ when possible! –  Roddy Aug 3 '11 at 20:08
1  
@Roddy: if you keep the functions short and if you have some discipline, there is nothing wrong with this approach. Gotos and macros have their use here. –  Alexandre C. Aug 3 '11 at 20:10
2  
These gotos are not in macros! :) –  pmg Aug 3 '11 at 20:14
    
@Alexandre: yes - in C you have to live with the cards that the language has dealt you - and Macros and gotos are essential ones. But personally, I don't have the necessary disipline to stay in control of that, which is why C++ and RAII works for me :-) –  Roddy Aug 3 '11 at 20:16
1  
@Roddy: sure, you're right. I stay away from C when I can. Sometimes you don't have the choice of the language though. –  Alexandre C. Aug 3 '11 at 20:24

Another macro-based approach which you can use to mitigate the shortcomings in C fairly easily:

#define CHECK(x) do { \
  int retval = (x); \
  if (retval != 0) { \
    fprintf(stderr, "Runtime error: %s returned %d at %s:%d", #x, retval, __FILE__, __LINE__); \
    return /* or throw or whatever */; \
  } \
} while (0)

Then to invoke it you have:

CHECK(doSomething1());
CHECK(doSomething2());
// etc.

For bonus points you could easily extend the CHECK macro to take a second argument y that is what to do on failure:

#define CHECK(x, y) do { \
  int retval = (x); \
  if (retval != 0) { \
    fprintf(stderr, "Runtime error: %s returned %d at %s:%d", #x, retval, __FILE__, __LINE__); \
    y; \
  } \
} while (0)

// We're returning a different error code
CHECK(someFunction1(foo), return someErrorCode);
// We're actually calling it from C++ and can throw an exception
CHECK(someFunction2(foo), throw SomeException("someFunction2 failed")):
share|improve this answer

I think you should look at exceptions and exception handling. http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/exceptions/

try{    
    callToUnderlyingLibrary1();
    callToUnderlyingLibrary2();
    callToUnderlyingLibrary3();
}catch(exception& e)
    //Handle exception
}

your library functions can throw exceptions if there is an error

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, that would have been nice, but unfortunately, it's not an option for us. We are tied to using a certain underlying library, which does not throw exceptions. –  Ren Aug 3 '11 at 19:56
8  
I won't downvote since the C++ tag has been removed after your answer. But the question deals with C, which has no try/catch construct. –  Alexandre C. Aug 3 '11 at 19:58
3  
Right. My fault for including the C++ tag to begin with. Please don't downvote this answer, which would apply correctly to C++. –  Ren Aug 3 '11 at 20:05
    
@Ren: Can you make a C++ wrapper for the library, then? Usability of most C libraries can be enormously improved for C++ with wrapper classes and a sprinkling of RAII and exceptions. –  Roddy Aug 3 '11 at 20:07
2  
@Roddy: Noted. I think that would be a good long-term enhancement of the codebase. –  Ren Aug 3 '11 at 20:12

Here is a proposition, you may or may not like it:

  • make your functions return 0 on failure, something else on success
  • if something fails in your functions, have them set a global (or static) variable to the error code (like errno)
  • create a die() function that prints the error depending of the error code (or whatever you want it to do)
  • call your functions with do_something(foo, bar) || die("Argh...");
share|improve this answer
1  
If your functions returned 0 on success, do_something(foo, bar) || die("Argh..."); would call die on success. –  Seth Carnegie Aug 3 '11 at 20:36
    
Corrected, thanks! –  Simon Aug 3 '11 at 20:44
    
This technique tends to generate spurious compiler warnings about 'value calculated is not used' unless you wrap it (void)(...) –  luser droog Aug 4 '11 at 17:08

You could do what you said, which is some rudimentary macro:

#define CHECK(x) (err = x()); \
                 if (err) { \
                      printf("blah %d on line %d of file %s\n", err, __LINE__, __FILE__); \
                 } \
                 else (void)0

And you could use it like

int err = 0;
CHECK(callToUnderlyingLibrary1); // don't forget the semicolon at the end
CHECK(callToUnderlyingLibrary2);
CHECK(callToUnderlyingLibrary3);
share|improve this answer
    
That's pretty bad macro style that leads to all sorts of weird parse issues, not to mention you have a macro that's suddenly expecting something about variables in the enclosing scope. –  fluffy Aug 3 '11 at 21:06
    
@fluffy What are some examples of weird parse issues? –  Seth Carnegie Aug 3 '11 at 21:21
    
if (someCondition) CHECK(blah); else CHECK(otherblah); - it's better to wrap a multi-statement macro in a do { ... } while (0) for this reason as it fixes pretty much all those situations. –  fluffy Aug 4 '11 at 21:16
    
@fluffy why would if (someCondition) CHECK(blah); else CHECK(otherblah); cause problems? –  Seth Carnegie Aug 4 '11 at 22:49
    
Because it's a multi-line expression, but CHECK is not enclosed in curly braces. Expand the macro out yourself; you end up with: if (someCondition) (err=x()); if(err){...}else (void)0; else (etc.) which doesn't even parse. –  fluffy Aug 7 '11 at 5:42

I prefer a variant of Alexandra C.'s goto-approach:

int foo()
{
    int rv = 0;
    struct bar *x = NULL;
    struct bar *y = NULL;
    rv = Function1();
    if (rv != OK){
      goto error;
    }
    //...
    x = acquire_structure();
    if (x==NULL){
      rv = ERROR_MEMORY;
      goto error;
    }
    //...
    rv = Function2();
    if (rv != OK){
      goto error;
    }
    //...
    y = acquire_structure();
    if (y==NULL){
      rv = ERROR_MEMORY;
      goto error;
    }
    //...

    rv = release_structure(x);
    x = NULL;
    if (rv != OK){
      goto error;
    }
    rv = release_structure(y);
    y = NULL;
    if (rv != OK){
      goto error;
    }
    return OK;

error:
    if (x!=NULL){
      release_structure(x);
    }
    return rv;
}

When you use multiple goto-destinations, it is easy to mix them up. Or perhaps you move the initialization of a variable, but forget to update the gotos. And it can be very difficult to test all ways a C-method can fail.

I prefer having a single goto-destination that performs all the cleanup. I find that makes it easier to avoid mistakes.

share|improve this answer

No 'goto', use only 1 'return' in functions. That's the elegant code.

IMHO, OP's question point and all answers are talking about FANCY techniques. Fancy code is just sort of eye candy.

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