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I'm trying to make a custom message box with my controls.

public static partial class Msg : Form
{
    public static void show(string content, string description)
    {

    }
}

Actually I need to place some controls (a gridview) in this form and I have to apply my own theme for this window, so I don't want to use MessageBox. I want to call this from my other forms like

Msg.show(parameters);

I don't wish to create an object for this form.

I know I can't inherit from Form class because it isn't static. But I wonder how MessageBox is implemented, because it is static. It is being called like MessageBox.show("Some message!");

Now I'm getting an error because inheritance is not allowed:

Static class 'MyFormName' cannot derive from type 'System.Windows.Forms.Form'. Static classes must derive from object

Screenshot of my form

How MessageBox is implemented then?

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2  
.NET's MessageBox is just a wrapper for the MessageBox that is part of Win32. You will need to create a Form object for your custom MessageBox. Possibly make it a singleton. Or just create a new Form, show it, and then dispose it each time Msg.Show() is called. –  Matt Greer Aug 3 '11 at 20:25
2  
Msg class doesn't have to be static for show to be static. –  Joe Aug 3 '11 at 20:27
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4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Your form class needs not to be static. In fact, a static class cannot inherit at all.

Instead, create an internal form class that derives from Form and provide a public static helper method to show it.

This static method may be defined in a different class if you don't want the callers to even “know” about the underlying form.

/// <summary>
/// The form internally used by <see cref="CustomMessageBox"/> class.
/// </summary>
internal partial class CustomMessageForm : Form
{
    /// <summary>
    /// This constructor is required for designer support.
    /// </summary>
    public CustomMessageForm ()
    {
        InitializeComponent(); 
    } 

    public CustomMessageForm (string title, string description)
    {
        InitializeComponent(); 

        this.titleLabel.Text = title;
        this.descriptionLabel.Text = description;
    } 
}

/// <summary>
/// Your custom message box helper.
/// </summary>
public static class CustomMessageBox
{
    public static void Show (string title, string description)
    {
        // using construct ensures the resources are freed when form is closed
        using (var form = new CustomMessageForm (title, description)) {
            form.ShowDialog ();
        }
    }
}

Side note: as Jalal points out, you don't have to make a class static in order to have static methods in it. But I would still separate the “helper” class from the actual form so the callers cannot create the form with a constructor (unless they're in the same assembly of course).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your quick reply.. I did the form.. Thank you Dan Abramov for a different Answer with internal class usage :) –  Sen Jacob Aug 3 '11 at 20:58
    
yeah, by using this internal class, I could prevent calling constructors, It was a new concept for me... Thank you once again for explaining. –  Sen Jacob Aug 3 '11 at 21:16
1  
Yeah—but this only works when you define these classes in a separate assembly. Another option would be to declare the Form class inside the static helper and declare it private but you would lose the designer so I think this isn't worth it. –  Dan Aug 3 '11 at 21:18
    
using (var form = new CustomMessageForm (title, description)) { form.ShowDialog ();} could you explain why you used var? .......... new CustomMessageForm (title, description).showDialog(); is this code has any problem to be a well programmed code? Sorry, I didn't got much chance to learn these concepts. I just want to learn these best practices –  Sen Jacob Aug 3 '11 at 21:35
1  
@BeediKumaraN: var lets the compiler infer the type for you so you don't have to write the name twice CustomMessageForm form = new CustomMessageForm. I suggest you google this first and also read this thread. Generally, please post a new question on its own instead of discussion in comments. –  Dan Aug 3 '11 at 21:39
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You don't need the class to be static. Just do something like:

public partial class Msg : Form
{
    public static void show(string content, string description)
    {
         Msg message = new Msg(...);
         message.show();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
-1 because you don't free the resources (and also Show isn't modal, you should call ShowDialog). –  Dan Aug 3 '11 at 20:34
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You don't need to make the class static in order to call one of its methods statically — it's sufficient to declare the particular method as static.

public partial class DetailedMessageBox : Form
{
    public DetailedMessageBox()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    public static void ShowMessage(string content, string description)
    {
        DetailedMessageBox messageBox = new DetailedMessageBox();
        messageBox.ShowDialog();
    }
}

We are using messageBox.ShowDialog() to have the form being displayed as a modal window. You can display the message box using DetailedMessageBox.ShowMessage("Content", "Description");.

By the way, you should rethink your naming and stick to a consistent naming pattern. Msg and show are weak names that do no match the Naming Guidelines — you would definitely want to check those out!

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Sure, I'll check those Naming Conventions. thank you for pointing that. –  Sen Jacob Aug 3 '11 at 21:19
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I have just written a single file replacement for MessageBox that is a good example how to "imitate" the static interface of MessageBox. You can download it here and use it like a standard MessageBox:

http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/601900/FlexibleMessageBox-A-flexible-replacement-for-the

Regards, Jörg

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Thanks, that is a nice solution :) –  Sen Jacob Jun 26 '13 at 10:15
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