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I have little problem with specifying my variable. I have a file with normal text and somewhere in it there are brackets [ ] (only 1 pair of brackets in whole file), and some text between them. I need to capture the text within these brackets in a shell (bash) variable. How can I do that, please?

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Do you mean a shell variable? Are you using Bash? –  strager Mar 28 '09 at 20:27
    
Forgot to mention, yes, in Bash –  Hyph Mar 28 '09 at 21:06

10 Answers 10

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Bash/sed:

VARIABLE=$(tr -d '\n' filename | sed -n -e '/\[[^]]/s/^[^[]*\[\([^]]*\)].*$/\1/p')

If that is unreadable, here's a bit of an explanation:

VARIABLE=`subexpression`      Assigns the variable VARIABLE to the output of the subexpression.

tr -d '\n' filename  Reads filename, deletes newline characters, and prints the result to sed's input

sed -n -e 'command'  Executes the sed command without printing any lines

/\[[^]]/             Execute the command only on lines which contain [some text]

s/                   Substitute
^[^[]*               Match any non-[ text
\[                   Match [
\([^]]*\)            Match any non-] text into group 1
]                    Match ]
.*$                  Match any text
/\1/                 Replaces the line with group 1
p                    Prints the line
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Pretty damn close to mine - you forgot to take the file name! –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 28 '09 at 20:35
    
@Leffler, Oops, thanks! I had it in my test but left it out in the solution. –  strager Mar 28 '09 at 20:38
    
OK - you've got a solution for [...] on a single line; I've got a solution for [ on one line and ] on another. How to combine so both work? –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 28 '09 at 20:42
    
@Jonathan: In Perl it is trivial (it works for multiple non-overlapping brackets too): perl -0777 -ne'print $1 while /[(.*?)]/gs' infile.txt –  J.F. Sebastian Mar 28 '09 at 20:54
1  
Please consider using $() instead of ``. It is POSIX compatible and much easier to read and disambiguate. –  camh Mar 28 '09 at 21:27

May I point out that while most of the suggested solutions might work, there is absolutely no reason why you should fork another shell, and spawn several processes to do such a simple task.

The shell provides you with all the tools you need:

$ var='foo[bar] pinch'
$ var=${var#*[}; var=${var%%]*}
$ echo "$var"
bar
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Sed is not necessary:

var=`egrep -o '\[.*\]' FILENAME | tr -d ][`

But it's only works with single line matches.

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that's the most readable for me, thanks –  CharlesB Nov 13 '12 at 17:53

Using Bash builtin regex matching seems like yet another way of doing it:

var='foo[bar] pinch'
[[ "$var" =~ [^\]\[]*\[([^\[]*)\].* ]]   # Bash 3.0
var="${BASH_REMATCH[1]}"
echo "$var"
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Assuming you are asking about bash variable:

$ export YOUR_VAR=$(perl -ne'print $1 if /\[(.*?)\]/' your_file.txt)

The above works if brackets are on the same line.

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Once you get beyond a certain point, Perl becomes easier than sed. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 28 '09 at 21:14

What about:

shell_variable=$(sed -ne '/\[/,/\]/{s/^.*\[//;s/\].*//;p;}' $file)

Worked for me on Solaris 10 under Korn shell; should work with Bash too. Replace '$(...)' with back-ticks in Bourne shell.

Edit: worked when given [ on one line and ] on another. For the single line case as well, use:

shell_variable=$(sed -n -e '/\[[^]]*$/,/\]/{s/^.*\[//;s/\].*//;p;}' \
                        -e '/\[.*\]/s/^.*\[\([^]]*\)\].*$/\1/p' $file)

The first '-e' deals with the multi-line spread; the second '-e' deals with the single-line case. The first '-e' says:

  • From the line containing an open bracket [ not followed by a close bracket ] on the same line
  • Until the line containing close bracket ],
  • substitute anything up to and including the open bracket with an empty string,
  • substitute anything from the close bracket onwards with an empty string, and
  • print the result

The second '-e' says:

  • For any line containing both open bracket and close bracket
  • Substitute the pattern consisting of 'characters up to and including open bracket', 'characters up to but excluding close bracket' (and remember this), 'stuff from close bracket onwards' with the remembered characters in the middle, and
  • print the result

For the multi-line case:

$ file=xxx
$ cat xxx
sdsajdlajsdl
asdajsdkjsaldjsal
sdasdsad [aaaa
bbbbbbb
cccc] asdjsalkdjsaldjlsaj
asdjsalkdjlksjdlaj
asdasjdlkjsaldja
$ shell_variable=$(sed -n -e '/\[[^]]*$/,/\]/{s/^.*\[//;s/\].*//;p;}' \
                          -e '/\[.*\]/s/^.*\[\([^]]*\)\].*$/\1/p' $file)
$ echo $shell_variable
aaaa bbbbbbb cccc
$

And for the single-line case:

$ cat xxx
sdsajdlajsdl
asdajsdkjsaldjsal
sdasdsad [aaaa bbbbbbb cccc] asdjsalkdjsaldjlsaj
asdjsalkdjlksjdlaj
asdasjdlkjsaldja
$
$ shell_variable=$(sed -n -e '/\[[^]]*$/,/\]/{s/^.*\[//;s/\].*//;p;}' \
                          -e '/\[.*\]/s/^.*\[\([^]]*\)\].*$/\1/p' $file)
$ echo $shell_variable
aaaa bbbbbbb cccc
$

Somewhere about here, it becomes simpler to do the whole job in Perl, slurping the file and editing the result string in two multi-line substitute operations.

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var=`grep -e '\[.*\]' test.txt | sed -e 's/.*\[\(.*\)\].*/\1/' infile.txt`
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Thanks to everyone, i used Strager's version and works perfectly, thanks alot once again...

var=`grep -e '\[.*\]' test.txt | sed -e 's/.*\[\(.*\)\].*/\1/' infile.txt`
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Is it unreasonable to ask why it is not Strager's version that is selected as 'the answer' given this information? –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 28 '09 at 21:24

Backslashes (BSL) got munched up ... :

var='foo[bar] pinch' 
[[ "$var" =~ [^\]\[]*\[([^\[]*)\].* ]]   # Bash 3.0 
# Just in case ...: 
[[ "$var" =~ [^BSL]BSL[]*BSL[([^BSL[]*)BSL].* ]]   # Bash 3.0 
var="${BASH_REMATCH[1]}" 
echo "$var"
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2 simple steps to extract the text.

  1. split var at [ and get the right part
  2. split var at ] and get the left part
cb0$ var='foo[bar] pinch'
cb0$ var=${var#*[}
cb0$ var=${var%]*} && echo $var
bar
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