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My goal is to access the byte[] representing the bytecode of a class without specifically knowing the location of the class files at runtime.

I have looked into two solutions and was able to get mild success out of one of them, but I was wondering if there might be other ways to accomplish it (or how I went wrong in the second solution that I couldn't get to work).

My first (mildly) successful solution was to use the java.lang.instrumentation ClassFileTransformer class to access the byte[] of the classes. Though this workek, I assumed that there must be a cleaner way to accomplish this.

My second solution was to use the -Xbootclasspath JVM argument to replace java.lang.ClassLoader with my own allowing it to have access to the byte[] of the classes loaded. I added a simple System.out.println debug message to confirm that the overriding of the ClassLoader was working, but it wasn't. I got this idea from this paper on the same subject. My class was made similarly to how the Integer class was remade in the linked paper. I also used a similar directory setup for the JVM argument looking something like this:

java -Xbootclasspath/p:.\out\production\boot\java\lang TestLoader

My thought is that the ClassLoader class specifically cannot be overridden using the method in the paper I linked.

I would be interested seeing why my attempt at overriding the ClassLoader did not work and also in hearing what else I could do to access the byte[] of classes.

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"My goal is to access the byte[] representing the bytecode of a class" No, that's a strategy to achieve an as yet unnamed goal. What feature (i.e. goal) do you want to offer to the end-user by doing any of this? –  Andrew Thompson Aug 4 '11 at 3:32
    
At the moment this is more of an educational question, I am not developing a product that needs to utilize this strategy. –  mburke13 Aug 4 '11 at 20:06
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Could you just read the class bytes using getResourceAsStream()?

InputStream is = String.class.getResourceAsStream("String.class");

Edit adding alternative:

(copied from comment)

Given all the possibilities that need to be covered, ClassFileTransformer and instrumentation API might be the way to go. I don't know what the requirements are for 'clean', but if the issue is having to specify command line arguments to the JVM you could try using the Attach API - you can attach to an already running Java process, push in your ClassFileTransformer, and look at all the classes already loaded in the JVM plus any that are loaded thereafter.

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That would work, but I may not have made clear that I don't have direct access to the class files at runtime per-say. –  mburke13 Aug 4 '11 at 2:29
    
@Matt Both solutions you specified in the questions are accessing class files at runtime. Could you clarify by what you mean about 'not having access to class files at runtime' (bytecode generated on the fly, custom classloaders, something else, etc.)? –  prunge Aug 4 '11 at 5:36
    
I want to be able to access any class' byte[] representation that is loaded into the JVM. Some classes (e.g. String.class) I would know the name of, but others I wouldn't. Also, the class files may or may not be on the local machine, whether it be by loading over a connection or by being generated dynamically. I'm sorry that it's such a broad range of possibilities to cover, but as I tried to explain, I'm interested in finding out if there is a method that covers all of these possibilities. –  mburke13 Aug 4 '11 at 20:10
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@Matt given all the possibilities that need to be covered, ClassFileTransformer and instrumentation API might be the way to go. I don't know what the requirements are for 'clean', but if the issue is having to specify command line arguments to the JVM you could try using the Attach API - you can attach to an already running Java process, push in your ClassFileTransformer, and look at all the classes already loaded in the JVM plus any that are loaded thereafter. –  prunge Aug 4 '11 at 22:49
    
That actually sounds like what I may be looking for, I will definitely check that out. Thanks! –  mburke13 Aug 5 '11 at 1:33
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The only explanation I could find was in french, but code is still in java. :)

http://www.google.ca/url?sa=t&source=web&cd=2&ved=0CCEQFjAB&url=http%3A%2F%2Fdeptinfo.unice.fr%2F~renevier%2Farchilog%2Fcours02-chargementDynamique-4p.pdf&rct=j&q=jvm%20define%20class%20loader&ei=Bv05ToKZFcaksQLSs-TDAg&usg=AFQjCNHnjhZbR-A1KWRppvyBP3n_XbrdMA

Pages 1-8 explain how to build a class loader and provide a nice idea to get bytes from class files.

Regards, stéphane

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I think you've just got the boot classpath wrong. Assuming that the class loader classfile is:

.\out\production\boot\java\lang\ClassLoader.class

you should use:

java -Xbootclasspath/p:.\out\production\boot TestLoader
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