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I'm new to using gcc inline assembly, and was wondering if, on an x86 multi-core machine, a spinlock (without race conditions) could be implemented as (using AT&T syntax):

spin_lock:
mov 0 eax
lock cmpxchg 1 [lock_addr]
jnz spin_lock
ret

spin_unlock:
lock mov 0 [lock_addr]
ret
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2 Answers 2

up vote 17 down vote accepted

You have the right idea, but your asm is broken:

cmpxchg can't work with an immediate operand, only registers.

lock is not a valid prefix for mov. mov to an aligned address is atomic on x86, so you don't need lock anyway.

It has been some time since I've used AT&T syntax, hope I remembered everything:

spin_lock:
xorl %ecx, %ecx
incl %ecx
spin_lock_retry:
xorl %eax, %eax
lock; cmpxchgl %ecx, (lock_addr)
jnz spin_lock_retry
ret

spin_unlock:
movl $0 (lock_addr)
ret

Note that GCC has atomic builtins, so you don't actually need to use inline asm to accomplish this:

void spin_lock(int *p)
{
    while(!__sync_bool_compare_and_swap(p, 0, 1));
}

void spin_unlock(int volatile *p)
{
    asm volatile (""); // acts as a memory barrier.
    *p = 0;
}

As Bo says below, locked instructions incur a cost: every one you use must flush your cache and lock your system's memory bus, which can be quite expensive if you've got enough CPUs. Even without many CPUs, it's still easy and worth it to optimize around:

void spin_lock(int volatile *p)
{
    while(!__sync_bool_compare_and_swap(p, 0, 1))
    {
        while(*p) _mm_pause();
    }
}

The pause instruction is vital for performance on HyperThreading CPUs when you've got code that spins like this -- it lets the second thread execute while the first thread is spinning. On CPUs which don't support pause, it is treated as a nop.

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Should the parameter for void spin_lock() also be declared volatile? –  ManRow Aug 4 '11 at 3:28
1  
No. __sync_bool_compare_and_swap already treats it as volatile. –  Cory Nelson Aug 4 '11 at 3:29
    
The asm used as memory barrier inside spin_unlock should probably include memory clobber. Though on the other hand, there is __sync_lock_release which is designed just to do the "write barrier, and write 0" thing without needing to think about asm at all, and it is even "somewhat portable". It doesn't explicitly work as read barrier (it incidentially does on the target architecture), but that's ok. The worst thing to happen is another thread doing a single extra spin in a rare, unlikely case. –  Damon Aug 4 '11 at 9:45
    
I think the actual spinlock should be implemented in as short a sequence as possible. Since we can lock when the vlock value is 0 (we replace it with 1 and get the 0 back) a more natural sequence would be to call the lock spinlock_failed which would be true when we get a 1 in return i e the lock failed. Additional functionality can then be build around spinlock_failed with retries etc. –  Olof Forshell Aug 17 '11 at 9:01
    
+1 for being a source to a similar question –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Aug 14 '12 at 19:48

This will put less contention on the memory bus:

void spin_lock(int *p)
{
    while(!__sync_bool_compare_and_swap(p, 0, 1)) while(*p);
}
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Agreed, though this code isn't so good. A simple while(*p) can easily be optimized out by the compiler. Add some barriers. Also, adding _mm_pause() for Intel chips can significantly improve performance. –  Cory Nelson Oct 19 '12 at 19:12

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