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How do I combine constructor injection with "manual" constructor parameters? ie.

public class SomeObject
{
    public SomeObject(IService service, float someValue)
    {
    }
}

Where IService should be resolved/injected by my DI container, and someValue should be specified. How do I mix the two?

share|improve this question
    
By manual constructor parameters do you mean when you are manually constructing the class instead of DI or you mean DI container passing in a parameter. If its the former then you could just do a constructor overload? – lahsrah Aug 4 '11 at 3:45
    
Whatever the case I always need IService, so I assume I couldn't just make an overload, sans the dependencies and it magically uses the full constructor (unless I use ServiceLocator - yuck!). – George R Aug 4 '11 at 4:22
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Such constructs should be avoided whenever possible. Therefore ask yourself is this parameter really required as constructor argument? Or can SomeObject be replaced by a stateless one which is reused by everyone that depends on it by passing the parameter to the method you execute on the object?

e.g. Instead of

public class SomeObject
{
    private float someValue
    public SomeObject(IService service, float someValue)
    {
        this.someValue = someValue
    }

    public float Do(float x)
    {
        return this.Service.Get(this.someValue) * x;
    }
}

use

public class SomeObject
{
    public SomeObject(IService service)
    {
    }

    public float Do(float x, float someValue)
    {
        return this.Service.Get(someValue) * x;
    }
}

If it is required go for a factory:

public interface ISomeObjectFactory
{
    ISomeObject CreateSomeObject(float someValue);
}

public class SomeObjectFactory : ISomeObjectFactory
{
    private IKernel kernel;
    public SomeObjectFactory(IKernel kernel) 
    {
        this.Kernel = kernel;
    }

    public ISomeObject Create(float someValue)
    {
        return this.kernel.Get<ISomeObject>(WithConstructorArgument("someValue", someValue);
    }
}

Preview: Ninject 2.4 will won't require the implementation anymore but allow

kernel.Bind<ISomeObjectFactory>().ToFactory();  // or maybe .AsFactory();
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Definitely avoiding is the right answer, edited my answer to agree. I know it would hide the point a bit, but as covered before elsewhere consider expressing your SomeObjectFactory with a Func<T> ctor arg rather than using Kernel directly – Ruben Bartelink Aug 4 '11 at 15:55
    
@Ruben Bartelink: I just succested this version because I think it will be the prefered one for Ninject 2.4. The factory will autogenerated by the kernel. The Func variant will also be supported with the disadvantage that Func gives no information about the parameters and makes parameter matching more difficult. Therefore I wouldn't stick with the Func variant anymore to be able to update by simply deleting the factory implementation and change the binding. But also I would put the factory into the bootstrapper while the interface in aside of the consumer. – Remo Gloor Aug 4 '11 at 21:00
    
Thanks for explaining the subtleties of the Func injection - hadnt thought that through. I was merely making a point that in your hand-impl of the Factory [that 2.4 will autogen], you are taking a ctor dep on the Kernel which could be removed by taking a Func instead. Thinking about it now, doing so would make answer less clear and not map to what ToFactory is going to do. So forget what I said and thanks for explaining! And it's su_gg_est :P BTW you have mistyped the method name as Create (not CreateSomeObject). I personally will use Func in preference as I live in an obfuscated world... – Ruben Bartelink Aug 4 '11 at 23:30
    
Love the ideas though - should allow less and less container-specific mucking about outside of bootstrappers. I'm still not sure I like the default behavior of allowing IKernel to be resolvable without an explicit binding and/or a WithKernelOption() on the Bind expression, but then I dont make a lot of Factory classes so I could be wrong – Ruben Bartelink Aug 4 '11 at 23:34

If 'somevalue' is always constant then you can think of using InjectionParameters while you are register your type with the container as it explained in the below post

See Here

but if that is not true, than there is no way to sepcify a parameter value while resolving a instance , you may think of moving the 'someValue' from the constructor and make it a property of the class.

share|improve this answer

You really shouldn't try to use D.I. for this. You could come up with all types of wacky solutions, but they may not make sense down the road.

Our approach is to create a factory via D.I., and the factory's Create method would then build itself out using the passed in D.I. container. We don't have to use this pattern often, but when we do it actually makes the product much cleaner (since it makes our dependency graphs smaller).

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In NInject, which you have tagged this with, you inject an automatically-generated Factory in the form of a Func<parameters you wish to feed in,T>, using the FuncModule as described in this post.

This approach is also available in autofac for one.

The various Factory method approaches are covered in the answers to this question.

EDIT: NB While this may be entertaining, please use @Remo Gloor's solution (and critically the advice re avoiding a solution of this nature)

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I would probably use a naive solution to this. If you know the value of someValue when you need it I would remove it from the constructor and add a property to your object so you can set someValue. This way you can get your object from your container and then set the value when you have the object.

My other suggestion is that you instead of accessing it directly you create a factory that you can use to create such object. Then you register the factory in your container and use the factory to create your instance. Something like this:

public class SomeObjectFactory : ISomeObjectFactory
{
    private IYourService _service;
    public SomeObjectFactory(IYourService service) 
    {
        _service = service;
    }

    public ISomeObject Create(float someValue)
    {
        return new SomeObject(_service, someValue);
    }
}

you could try a pattern like that.

UPDATE: Updated the code to reflect improvement comments.

share|improve this answer
    
You seem to have a hard dependency on the container of your choice in SomeObjectFactory. This isn't widely recommended. Instead, inject the IYourService instance into the SomeObjectFactory constructor and let the conatiner resolve that dependency in the composition root. – Johann Gerell Aug 4 '11 at 9:08
    
Of course, my code is just an outline, it is not the final implementation. The point is that he should use a factory instead. But I updated the code according to what I think you meant. – Tomas Jansson Aug 4 '11 at 9:11
    
Much better! :) – Johann Gerell Aug 4 '11 at 11:47

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