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I have a UIViewController (call it A) with a NSDate instance I'm already retaining and synthesize.

In another method I am creating another UIViewController (call it B) and wish to pass it the NSDate instance. In B, I am going to be using it. Should I be also be retaining and synthesizing this instance as well? I assume B will be using the same NSDate instance that A created, and there might be the chance that A's instance could be deleted in viewDidUnload if memory is running out.

On the other hand, if I retain and synthesize it, I'm going to deallocate it when B's view is gone. And when I return to A, the NSDate instance is gone.

So, what is the best practice here? Should I just create a new NSDate object in B and make it the same date as the one passed in? and retain/synthesize this new instance?

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I could be misunderstanding your question, but it doesn't sound like you have a very good idea of how reference counting works in Objective C. (I don't mean any offence by that; it can be tricky to get the hang of.) If you're managing your memory properly, your NSDate instance will not be deallocated when B's view is gone. Your setup should be something like this.

// A.h
@property(nonatomic, retain) NSDate *myDate;
@synthesize myDate;

// A.m
- (id) init
{
    if ( self = [super init] )
    {
        // Setter retains the new NSDate instance; its reference count is now 1
        // (after autorelease)
        [self setMyDate:[NSDate date]];
    }

 return self;
}

- (void) someMethod
{
    // Assume b is a pointer to your B instance. B's setter retains the NSDate
    // again; it's reference count is now 2
    [b setMyDate: myDate];
}

- (void) dealloc
{
    [myDate release];
}

// B.h
@property(nonatomic, retain) NSDate *myDate;
@synthesize myDate;

// B.m
- (void) dealloc
{
    // Assuming B is deallocated first, the NSDate's reference count will
    // now be 1.  It will still be accessible to the A.
    [myDate release];
}

Now, when your B instance is deallocated, your NSDate instance will be released. Being released is not the same thing as being deallocated. The released object will still have a reference count of 1 because it was originally retained by the A instance. The NSDate instance will not be deallocated until the A instance releases it and its reference count drops to zero. Hope that helps.

More information on memory management in Objective C is available here. See also this question.

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But in B's viewDidUnload, the NSDate instance is being set to nil. Isn't this a problem when A still retains it? or should I not set it to nil in viewDidUnload? – Henley Chiu Aug 5 '11 at 2:26
    
A and B maintain separate pointers to the NSDate instance. When B's viewDidUnload is called, you are setting its pointer to the NSDate instance to nil. The instance itself still exists in memory and is still accessible to A. It is a problem if you are setting the pointer to the NSDate to nil without first releasing it. That will cause a memory leak, because the retain count of the NSDate will not be decremented properly so it will never be deallocated. – Mitch Lindgren Aug 5 '11 at 17:04
    
Regarding whether or not you should release and nil out the NSDate in viewDidUnload, I'd say that it's probably not worthwhile to do so. Since it is still retained by A, it will not be freed from memory if your A instance still exists when B's viewDidUnload is called. Thus, you're not really accomplishing anything by releasing it in that method. – Mitch Lindgren Aug 5 '11 at 17:27
    
Hmm... generally speaking, when we nil something out in viewDidUnLoad, we're just setting the pointer to nil, not deallocating its memory? So when does the memory get deallocated? Just asking, generally. I always got the impression setting it to nil deallocates it. I mean.. how else does memory get deallocated? – Henley Chiu Aug 5 '11 at 19:03
    
In garbage-collected languages such as Java you'd be correct. In a Java application, the JVM keeps track of which references point where. When you set something to null in Java, the reference is lost, so the JVM seems that the object is not referenced anywhere and garbage collects it. Objective C on the iPhone does not have garbage collection, so setting the pointer to nil does absolutely nothing. It's still a good idea to set pointers to nil when you're done with them to avoid the memory safety issues caused by dangling pointers... – Mitch Lindgren Aug 5 '11 at 22:24

I totally understand what you want. I suggest you to make property for NSDate.

//.h

NSDate *date;  

@property(nonatomic,retain) NSDate *date;  

//.m  

@synthesize date; 

And use date in B viewcontroller. Now the operations you are carrying out initially on date should not be in viewDidLoad, they should be in viewWillAppear. This will help you get date value when you return from B to A as viewWillAppear is always called.

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