Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.
@property (nonatomic,copy) NSString *orginalString;

..
NSString *tmpString =[[NSString alloc] init];
self.orginalString=tmpString;
[tmpString release];
NSString *newString =self.orginalString;  

What happens here to newString?, is this correct what I am doing?

orginalString retain count 1 at first, and when it is referenced with another pointer "newString" its retain count will be 2? do I need to say "self.orginalString=nil" in the end? there are serious memory leaks but dont know it is something related with this.

share|improve this question
1  
Use Instruments to analyze what causes the memory leaks. –  David Aug 4 '11 at 8:29
1  
In fact, before using Instruments, do Build => Analyze. This will point out obvious memory leaks. –  sosborn Aug 4 '11 at 8:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
  NSString *tmpString =[[NSString alloc] init];

tmpString is allocated and initialized

  self.orginalString=tmpString;

the string pointed to by tmpString is copied over to self.originalString (because the property is declared copy);

  [tmpString release];

the string pointed to by tmpString is released, correctly; nothing happens to the string pointed to by self.orginalString;

  NSString *newString =self.orginalString;  

a new pointer is created and initalized to point at the same string pointed to by self.orginalString; nothing happens to self.orginalString retain count; it's just a second pointer pointing to the same object;

at this point, if you don't release somewhere self.orginalString, it will be leaked.

When you are dealing with memory management in OBjective C, my suggestion is not try and reason in terms of "retain count"; retain count is just the mechanism that is used by the ObjC runtime to keep track of objects; it is too low-level and there are too many other objects around to increase or decrease the retain count, so that you immediately loose count.

The best way, IMO, is reasoning in terms of ownership: when an object wants ownership of another, it will send a retain; when it has done with it, it sends release. Ownership is a local concept to a class, so it is easy to track down.

So, when you do:

   NSString *newString =self.orginalString;  

newString is just a pointer to a not-owned object; you do not need to balance that assignment with a release; on the contrary, if you do:

   NSString *newString = [self.orginalString retain];

you are making yourself responsible for releasing the object when you have done with it.

share|improve this answer
    
tnx you said it will leak if I dont release, is it because I said NSString *newString =self.orginalString? and I already release it in dealloc, also do I have to nillify it in my methods? –  Spring Aug 4 '11 at 8:42
1  
no, that assignment NSString *newString =self.orginalString will not require you to release once more the object. You need to release self.orginalString in the dealloc method, though, because when you assigned to it, you got ownership for the object. If you do in dealloc, it is already enough. –  sergio Aug 4 '11 at 8:49
    
tnx I need to reset its value in the code, so nillify it in some other method, does it have consequences? –  Spring Aug 4 '11 at 8:56
    
You can set the value of a property to nil as many times as you like. –  sergio Aug 4 '11 at 8:58
1  
I think that Kendall Helmstetter Geln's answer is correct about theXML. If you have more problems, please, at lease update the code and your findings after applying his suggestion (using autorelease when alloc] init theXML. –  sergio Aug 4 '11 at 9:43

You should visit this link. Actually, we should not check memory leaks with retain count, atleast for NSString.

To check memory leaks, always use Instruments coming with Xcode.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.