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“Least Astonishment” in Python: The Mutable Default Argument

Consider the following function:

def foo(L = []):
  L.append(1)
  print L

Each time I call foo it will print a new list with more elements than previous time, e.g:

>>> foo()
[1]
>>> foo()
[1, 1]
>>> foo()
[1, 1, 1]

Now consider the following function:

def goo(a = 0):
  a += 1
  print a

When invoking it several times, we get the following picture:

>>> goo()
1
>>> goo()
1
>>> goo()
1

i.e. it does not print a larger value with every call.

What is the reason behind such seemingly inconsistent behavior?
Also, how is it possible to justify the counter-intuitive behavior in the first example, why does the function retain state between calls?

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marked as duplicate by Jacob, Daniel Roseman, delnan, eumiro, Graviton Aug 4 '11 at 9:42

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
As well as many other answers on the same question. –  Daniel Roseman Aug 4 '11 at 9:03
    
Why are we all of a sudden getting this question a zillion times? –  Karl Knechtel Aug 4 '11 at 9:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The default arguments are evaluated once when the function is defined. So you get the same list object each time the function is called.

You'll also get the same 0 object each time the second function is called, but since int is immutable, when you add 1 as fresh object needs to be bound to a

>>> def foo(L = []):
...   print id(L)
...   L.append(1)
...   print id(L)
...   print L
... 
>>> foo()
3077669452
3077669452
[1]
>>> foo()
3077669452
3077669452
[1, 1]
>>> foo()
3077669452
3077669452
[1, 1, 1]

vs

>>> def foo(a=0):
...   print id(a)
...   a+=1
...   print id(a)
...   print a
... 
>>> foo()
165989788
165989776
1
>>> foo()
165989788
165989776
1
>>> foo()
165989788
165989776
1
share|improve this answer
    
That does not quite answer my question - I don't see why the second example (with an integer parameter) works as it does. –  user500944 Aug 4 '11 at 9:02
    
> You'll also get the same 0 object each time the second function is called -- then why can't I get the same [] object each time the first function is called? –  user500944 Aug 4 '11 at 9:04
1  
@Grigory: Integers are immutable, some_int += ... creates a new integer instead of modifying some_int. a starts off with the same 0 each time the function is called without argument given, you just go on to change a to point to 0 + 1. –  delnan Aug 4 '11 at 9:04
    
In fact, you're getting the same object each time the first function is called. That's why it "remembers" its previous content. –  Michał Bentkowski Aug 4 '11 at 9:06
    
@delnan thanks, that explains everything. –  user500944 Aug 4 '11 at 9:06