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I could use something like javas finally clause in a C switch. Most of my cases has a shared set of functionality that I would like to put a single case. I was thinking of implementing this using goto statements, being well aware of gotos code obfuscation ability, putting the shared case at the bottom of the switch statement still seems a "cleaner" way to do this than partitioning the shared functionality into a seperate function.

Anyway, I have been trying to do it something like this:

switch( x ) {
case 0:
    printf("Case 0\n");
    goto case 2;
    break;
case 1:
    printf("Case 1\n");
    goto case 2;
    break;
case 2:
    printf("Case 2\n");
    break;
default:
    // do nothing
    break;
}

However, using gcc, this fail with the error

error: expected identifier or ‘*’ before ‘case’

Any suggestions on how to make it work? Or possibly a better approach?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The "best practice" is of course to delegate the shared code to a function. But in some situations where this is overengineering, or simply not possible / desirable, then you can do:

switch( x ) 
{
case 0:
    printf("Case 0\n");
    goto shared_material;

case 1:
    printf("Case 1\n");
    goto shared_material; // Unnecessary, but keep it for clarity.

case 2:
shared_material:
    printf("Case 2\n");
    break;

default:
    // Write a meaningful error message somewhere
    return -1;
}

I don't find this too unreadable, and I don't have any problem with it, provided the whole statement fits in one screen (otherwise it qualifies as spaghetti code). However, you may have to defend it in code reviews, which is one of the main reasons I would step away from such constructs and rethink the code.

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Well, this works. I just sorta thought that the case statements were labels internally in the switch statements. –  Kenneth Aug 4 '11 at 9:10
    
@Kenneth: not in C. They are in C# (and possibly in Java), because C# doesn't allow you to fall through a case statement, so you use goto where in C you would use a // fall through comment. –  Alexandre C. Aug 4 '11 at 9:17
    
Internally, in the generated code, they behave like labels, but in C, syntactically, they are not. –  Rudy Velthuis Aug 4 '11 at 9:17
    
I agree with this solution and your comment as well! If the shared code is of significant size it deserves its own function. In my case the total shared code is four lines (using two local variables) and adding a function just seems... well what's the opposite of cluttered code, scattered code? –  Kenneth Aug 4 '11 at 9:33
    
"....But in some situations where this is overengineering, or simply not possible / desirable"... I challenge you to exhibit "some situations". –  Karl Knechtel Aug 4 '11 at 10:38

Why not put the common code after the switch?

I feel I have to update this reply, paraphrasing the accepted answer with one I feel has a better design:

switch( x )
{
    case 0:
        printf("Case 0\n");
        break;

    case 1:
        printf("Case 1\n");
        break;

    case 2:
        break;

    default:
        return -1; 
}

printf("Common code for cases 0, 1 and 2\n");

Or, you could of course set a flag in the 'default' case that would prevent the common code from executing, if you for some reason don't want to break it out to a separate function.

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I forgot to mention that only some cases needs to share that code. –  Kenneth Aug 4 '11 at 9:07
    
Then it's not working like javas' finally ;-) Updated my answer too to show what I mean –  Christoffer Aug 4 '11 at 10:29
    
True. And finally only applies to exceptions as well. Maybe a should rephrase the original question. –  Kenneth Aug 4 '11 at 11:14
    
...actually not, see the tutorial for Java finally ;-) (download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/exceptions/… ) –  Christoffer Aug 5 '11 at 6:43

you could use a flag do2, set it if needed and check it after the switch.

if it is more complex with many hierarchical dependencies then build a state machine with transitions.

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I'd rather going for this approach:

void sharedFunction() {
    printf("Case 2\n");
}

switch( x ) {
case 0:
    printf("Case 0\n");
    sharedFunction();
    break;
case 1:
    printf("Case 1\n");
    sharedFunction();
    break;
case 2:
    sharedFunction();
    break;
default:
    // do nothing
    break;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I know that this is the "right way" to do it, but that seems cluttered to me, as the shared code in this case are no more than a handful of lines. –  Kenneth Aug 4 '11 at 9:12
    
There's no limit how short a function might be. :) –  Johan Aug 4 '11 at 9:16
    
@Kenneth: I don't like it either. When you want to add shared stuff which depends on local variables, then you'll have to add an argument to sharedFunction and thus to change the code in 3 different places. The goto approach is superior in this respect. Clean solutions should stay away from the switch construct insofar as possible. –  Alexandre C. Aug 4 '11 at 9:20

Following works:

switch( x ) {
case 0:
    printf("Case 0\n");
    if(0)
case 1:{
    printf("Case 1\n");
    }
case 2:
    printf("Case 2\n");
    break;
default:
    // do nothing
    break;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I am impressed. I would never have come up with this and I would hate to maintain code that included this, but I am impressed none the less. –  Kenneth Aug 4 '11 at 9:40
    
@Kenneth, wrapping all case statements in {} is a good practice (here you should wrap all of them in {}). What I am doing is just putting an if(0). At least avoiding the use of goto. –  iammilind Aug 4 '11 at 9:45
    
But this solution will only work for a single case statement. –  Kenneth Aug 4 '11 at 11:16
    
@Kenneth, it will work universally; I have written here what you posted in your question. You can extend as you want. –  iammilind Aug 4 '11 at 11:22

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