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My company has recently moved to Alfresco as a content management solution. As some of the content is dynamic (a .jsp file that is included in another .jsp reads a sitemap published as xml from Alfresco and caches the result for 24hr) the generated files are of .jsp and are rsync'ed and served from our Sun Web Server 7 servlet container.

Each page has a header, a menu, and a footer that is included using the jsp:include runtime directive. My understanding is that when the first request is made to index.jsp there will be a number of compiled jsps e.g. index.class, header.class, menu.class, and footer.class. The requirement is to have these compile once with the servlet container checking for modification of any of the source jsps (pushed out by Alfresco) every x seconds.

The web server itself has been configred (default-web.xml) to be production-ready with the following parameters as recommended by Sun docs:

<init-param>
  <param-name>development</param-name>
  <param-value>false</param-value>
</init-param>
<init-param>
  <param-name>checkInterval</param-name>
  <param-value>0</param-value>
</init-param>   
  <init-param>
  <param-name>fork</param-name>
<param-value>true</param-value>
</init-param>
<init-param>
  <param-name>mappedfile</param-name>
  <param-value>false</param-value>
</init-param>
<init-param>
  <param-name>suppressSmap</param-name>
  <param-value>true</param-value>
</init-param>
<init-param>
  <param-name>classdebuginfo</param-name>
  <param-value>false</param-value>
</init-param>
<init-param>
  <param-name>trimSpaces</param-name>
  <param-value>true</param-value>
</init-param>

Note that the checkInterval parameter should be set to 60, but doing this results in the web server failing to start (I haven't been able to figure out why). The unfortunate workaround for this is then to set development to true, which I'd like to avoid.

The servlet container is configured with the following JVM settings (again as recommended by Sun docs):

-server -Xrs -Xmx2048m -Xms2048m -Xmn2024m -XX:+AggressiveHeap -XX:LargePageSizeInBytes=256m -XX:+UseParallelOldGC -XX:+UseParallelGC -XX:ParallelGCThreads=8 -XX:+DisableExplicitGC

During performance testing we are seeing the Eden space spiking frequently to 2gb (The total size of our static content is roughly 200mb, and our testing is against a handful of pages). The results in alot of minor collections; pushing objects quickly into Tenured space, and it never really recovers resulting in alot of frequent full GC (The survivor space also shrinks from 90mb to 2 bytes which I can only assume is Eden space claiming it for its own - can anyone confirm?). This is our biggest questionmark; none of our developers think this is normal behaviour, but we cannot explain where that memory is going.

Snapshot of Eden space under load

The other issue we are seeing is thread count. With each http request resulting in a new thread at the servlet, I would expect it to rise proportional to the load (I also think a new thread is created within each servlet too when doing a jsp:include at runtime (RequestDispatcher.include() in the compiled parent jsp). However, once each request is serviced the thread should die and a new one spawned in its place. Is this a correct assumption? The thread count seems to stop and grow irrespective of the load.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

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1 Answer

A sawtooth pattern in the heap usage graph is normal, and not indicative of the memory leak. A memory leak is only indicated if the lower bound of the sawtooth trends upwards over time.

However, always performing Full GCs is a concern, and this may indicate a storage leak. Try running with a memory profiler to see if you can spot what is leaking.

I have a feeling that I know what might be causing the leak. I think you said that you are dynamically generating JSPs. Each time the container finds a new (or updated) JSP, it generates Java classes, compiles the classes and then loads the bytecodes. If you are not careful, the old classes / old versions of classes will remain reachable and leak.


I would also not expect the thread count to rise and fall with the load. A decent web container will maintain a pool of threads that are used to process incoming requests. The thread pool typically has a fixed upper bound so that a storm of requests doesn't lead to an explosion of the number of threads, resulting in resource usage and contention problems.

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I agree that the expected pattern is the one depicted above, however my concern is with the fact that the peaks are at the limit of the Young generation size, for what is effectively very little work being done by the servlet container. –  pertinky Aug 4 '11 at 10:08
    
Also, in relation to the dynamic re-compilation; according to some Jasper2 documentation there is a memory leak in the javac ant task that runs in the JVM, and you are advised to use fork=true to compile the jsps in a separate JVM process. The above graph comes from a web server not forking, and I am currently running one with forking on so see if that makes a difference. –  pertinky Aug 4 '11 at 10:10
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