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I implemented a full text search "searching in tags", using SQL server 2005, I want to describe for the client what i did, what what full text search means by simple examples? My Client is not a programmer but a good internet user.

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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I find when describing something to clients use a metaphor or use a very concrete domain specific example.

As a metaphor you could say that Full Text Search is like Google for your site. It looks at everything and anything to try and help you. Whereas, what we had before was more like using the Find feature in XP. It works, but works well if you know a lot about what you are searching for. And isn't Google better than Find :)

Or just give them an example of something they couldn't do before that they can do now! Experience and results always convey the message more than words. Show them how you made their lives easier and they will immediately understand.

Best of luck.

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"It now finds stuff much much faster."

Everything else is technical details not interesting to a user.

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"Finds information using non exact matches"

Give some examples.

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"finds stuff faster, and works more like google".

Gotta toss in a comparison to a search engine--hell, I can't even really describe what "full text search" means. "Full Text Search" is a technical term, really.

I can describe what I dislike about search. Requiring me to type in boolean junk like "cat AND dog" or not offering me alternative queries. In other words, maybe think about what what was wrong with the old way and why this one is better.

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