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Is there a way to have reliable communications (the sender get informed that the message it sent is already received by the receiver) using Java TCP/IP library in java.net.*? I understand that one of the advantages of TCP over UDP is its reliability. Yet, I couldn't get that assurance in the experiment below:

I created two classes:

1) echo server => always sending back the data it received.

2) client => periodically send "Hello world" message to the echo server.

They were run on different computers (and worked perfectly). During the middle of the execution, I disconnected the network (unplugged the LAN cable). After disconnected, the server still keep waiting for a data until a few seconds passed (it eventually raised an exception). Similarly, the client also keep sending a data until a few seconds passed (an exception is raised).

The problem is, objectOutputStream.writeObject(message) doesn't guarantee the delivery status of the message (I expect it to block the thread, keep resending the data until delivered). Or at least I get informed, which messages are missing.

Server Code:

import java.net.*;
import java.io.*;

import java.io.Serializable;

public class SimpleServer {
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        try {
            ServerSocket serverSocket = new ServerSocket(2002);
            Socket socket = new Socket();
            socket = serverSocket.accept();
            InputStream inputStream = socket.getInputStream();
            ObjectInputStream objectInputStream = new ObjectInputStream(
                    inputStream);

            while (true) {
                try {
                    String message = (String) objectInputStream.readObject();
                    System.out.println(message);
                    Thread.sleep(1000);
                } catch (Exception ex) {
                    ex.printStackTrace();
                }
            }
        } catch (Exception ex) {
            ex.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

Client code:

import java.net.*;
import java.io.*;

public class SimpleClient {
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        try {
            String serverIpAddress = "localhost"; //change this

            Socket socket = new Socket(serverIpAddress, 2002);
            OutputStream outputStream = socket.getOutputStream();
            ObjectOutputStream objectOutputStream = new ObjectOutputStream(
                    outputStream);

            while (true) {
                String message = "Hello world!";
                objectOutputStream.writeObject(message);

                System.out.println(message);
                Thread.sleep(1000);
            }
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}
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5 Answers 5

If you need to know which messages have arrived in the peer application, the peer application has to send acknowledgements.

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Isn't it already done by TCP protocol? –  Pahlevi Fikri Auliya Aug 5 '11 at 1:39
    
@Pahlevi Fikri Auliya No it isn't. TCP/IP does its best to ensure arrival at the peer host. If you want to know whether it got into the peer application, the peer application has to tell you. –  EJP Aug 10 '11 at 11:50
    
+1 If you don't want to use higher level protocols like RMI or a MOM this is the preferable way to go. –  schlamar Jun 4 '12 at 13:16

If you want this level of guarantees it sounds like you really want JMS. This can ensure not only that messages have been delivered but also have been processed correctly. i.e. there is no point having very reliable delivery if it can be discarded due to a bug.

You can monitor which messages are waiting and which consumers are falling behind. Watch a producer to see what messages it is sending, and have messages saved when it is down and are available when it restarts. i.e. reliable delivery even if the consumer is restarted.

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TCP is always reliable. You don't need confirmations. However, to check that a client is up, you might also want to use a UDP stream with confirmations. Like a PING? PONG! system. Might also be TCP settings you can adjust.

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1  
so, how to detect which messages are lost when disconnected? –  Pahlevi Fikri Auliya Aug 4 '11 at 9:49
    
You could use a TCP handshake when the client connects to the server, stating how much was sent last time. Before the TCP transfer starts, you should transmit the file size. This is how HTTP downloads work, where you can resume the transfer. The client would also know their transfer was incomplete. –  Chris Dennett Aug 4 '11 at 12:15
    
That's wrong, see stackoverflow.com/questions/6939204/… –  schlamar Jun 4 '12 at 13:12

Your base assumption (and understanding of TCP) here is wrong. If you unplug and then re-plug, the message most likely will not be lost.
It boils down on how long to you want the sender to wait. One hour, one day? If you'd make the timeout one day, you would unplug for two days and still say "does not work".

So the guaranteed delivery is that "either data is delivered - or you get informed". In the second case you need to solve it on application level.

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I tried to unplug and replug, but the messages sent between that period is not received by the server. –  Pahlevi Fikri Auliya Aug 4 '11 at 9:53
    
That's not correct about the guaranteed delivery, see: lkml.indiana.edu/hypermail/linux/kernel/0106.1/1154.html –  schlamar Jun 4 '12 at 13:11

You could consider using the SO_KEEPALIVE socket option which will cause the connection to be closed if no data is transmitted over the socket for 2 hours. However, obviously in many cases this doesn't offer the level of control typically needed by applications.

A second problem is that some TCP/IP stack implementations are poor and can leave your server with dangling open connections in the event of a network outage.

Therefore, I'd advise adding application level heartbeating between your client and server to ensure that both parties are still alive. This also offers the advantage of severing the connection if, for example a 3rd party client remains alive but becomes unresponsive and hence stops sending heartbeats.

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