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I'm learning C++ now. What are the complete legal entities that can be put in a namespace?

Legal entities here means valid members of a namespace

Oh, this is a real question. I'm coming from .net and I have the .net mindset.

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1  
What's a "complete legal entity"? – Mat Aug 4 '11 at 10:32
    
Perhaps if you could give a couple of examples of things you think are allowed, and things you think aren't, people may be able to work out what you mean. – Damien_The_Unbeliever Aug 4 '11 at 10:32
    
class, etc .... – Tupa Aug 4 '11 at 10:33
4  
"I'm learning Japanese now. What are the complete legal entities that can be put before the particle 'wa'?" This is a horrible approach to learning any language - computerized or otherwise - or to learning any thing, really. – Karl Knechtel Aug 4 '11 at 10:35
1  
@Karl Knechtel: After the fun, please help me now ... – Tupa Aug 4 '11 at 10:37

Any code can be put inside namespace.

However main() function must be at global namespace. It cannot be put inside user-defined namespace.

namespace userns
{
  int main() 
  {
     return 0; 
  }
}

This program wouldn't compile link : http://www.ideone.com/k6SPc

Its because userns::main() will not be considered entry-point of the program; it became just like any other user function, not the standard main(). To compile it successfull, you've to add main() at global namespace:

namespace userns
{
  int main() 
  {
     return 0; 
  }
}

int main() 
{
     return 0; 
}

This will compile link now : http://www.ideone.com/76Ynu

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1  
This program wouldn't compile. It compiles, it doesn't link. Putting main() inside namespace is legally allowed (as your 2nd example suggests). Just that the entry point should be a global main(). – iammilind Aug 4 '11 at 10:48
    
@iammilind: Good point. Corrected. – Nawaz Aug 4 '11 at 10:50

Anything can be put in a namespace (which is legal for C++, of course).

Actually, everything is in some namespace - the global namespace, if not specified.

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Are macros in a namespace ? I don't think they can be put in a namespace ... that's why you have to prefix them ... – J.N. Aug 4 '11 at 10:38
    
No one can stop you putting macros in a namespace. What this does is something else. – Kiril Kirov Aug 4 '11 at 10:39
    
You cannot put anything in namespace. There are few restrictions. I have described in my answer. – iammilind Aug 4 '11 at 10:44
    
I don't agree with the restrictions in your answer. I don't say they are wrong. I'm just saying, that there are a lot of things like this, that can be written. But they are just logically wrong. It's like - "put one function in namespace A and call it from namespace B, without specifying the scope or including the whole namespace" - of course this is not allowed, but.. is it a restriction in the meaning, @Tupa asks? So many such things. So, I don't think so. – Kiril Kirov Aug 4 '11 at 10:46
    
I am not talking about scope at all. See my edited answer. – iammilind Aug 4 '11 at 10:50

Everything can be put in namespace except few "entities", which will not compile.

(1) Globally overloaded operator new and operator delete

namespace N
{
  void* operator new (size_t size) // error
  { ... }
}

(2) Definition of the constructs which are declared in outer scope of the namespace; for example you have a class A declared globally then you cannot define its method inside your namespace N. In the same way, if you have method declared in a namespace N then you cannot put its definition inside namespace N::Nested (i.e. Nested is a namespace inside N).

//file
struct A {
  void foo ();
  static int i;
};

namespace N
{
  int A::i = 0; // error
  void A::foo()  // error
  {}
}

Demo: this is not allowed.

I remember at least these 2 restrictions from my experience. Don't know about specs.

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More precisely: all of the definitions and declarations pertaining to a class must be in the same namespace. – James Kanze Aug 4 '11 at 11:02
1  
@James, same thing I have covered. However, definitions can be in outer namespace also. – iammilind Aug 4 '11 at 11:21

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