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I'm trying to implement a simple client/server in ASIO.

I'd like the following on the serverside:

onConnect()
onDisconnect()
onMessageRecieved(char* data)
sendMessage(char* data)

and on the client side:

onConnect()
onDisconnect()
onMessageRecieved(char* data)
sendMessage(char* data)

I didn't realise things would be so complicated.

Here's the simple echo server which I'm working off of:

#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
#include <boost/bind.hpp>
#include <boost/asio.hpp>

using boost::asio::ip::tcp;

class session
{
public:
  session(boost::asio::io_service& io_service)
    : socket_(io_service)
  {
  }

  tcp::socket& socket()
  {
    return socket_;
  }

  void start()
  {
    socket_.async_read_some(boost::asio::buffer(data_, max_length),
        boost::bind(&session::handle_read, this,
          boost::asio::placeholders::error,
          boost::asio::placeholders::bytes_transferred));
  }

  void handle_read(const boost::system::error_code& error,
      size_t bytes_transferred)
  {
    if (!error)
    {
      boost::asio::async_write(socket_,
          boost::asio::buffer(data_, bytes_transferred),
          boost::bind(&session::handle_write, this,
            boost::asio::placeholders::error));
    }
    else
    {
      delete this;
    }
  }

  void handle_write(const boost::system::error_code& error)
  {
    if (!error)
    {
      socket_.async_read_some(boost::asio::buffer(data_, max_length),
          boost::bind(&session::handle_read, this,
            boost::asio::placeholders::error,
            boost::asio::placeholders::bytes_transferred));
    }
    else
    {
      delete this;
    }
  }

private:
  tcp::socket socket_;
  enum { max_length = 1024 };
  char data_[max_length];
};

class server
{
public:
  server(boost::asio::io_service& io_service, short port)
    : io_service_(io_service),
      acceptor_(io_service, tcp::endpoint(tcp::v4(), port))
  {
    session* new_session = new session(io_service_);
    acceptor_.async_accept(new_session->socket(),
        boost::bind(&server::handle_accept, this, new_session,
          boost::asio::placeholders::error));
  }

  void handle_accept(session* new_session,
      const boost::system::error_code& error)
  {
    if (!error)
    {
      new_session->start();
      new_session = new session(io_service_);
      acceptor_.async_accept(new_session->socket(),
          boost::bind(&server::handle_accept, this, new_session,
            boost::asio::placeholders::error));
    }
    else
    {
      delete new_session;
    }
  }

private:
  boost::asio::io_service& io_service_;
  tcp::acceptor acceptor_;
};

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
  try
  {
    if (argc != 2)
    {
      std::cerr << "Usage: async_tcp_echo_server <port>\n";
      return 1;
    }

    boost::asio::io_service io_service;

    using namespace std; // For atoi.
    server s(io_service, atoi(argv[1]));

    io_service.run();
  }
  catch (std::exception& e)
  {
    std::cerr << "Exception: " << e.what() << "\n";
  }

  return 0;
}

I can telnet into this server and everything is echoed.

Now I'd like to wrap up this code in onConnect(), onDisconnect(), onMessageReceived(char* data), etc. Similar to the way things are done in Node.js!

Has anyone got any pointers in this regard?

share|improve this question
    
You're asking for a significant amount of code to be written for you. What have you tried so far? –  Chad Aug 4 '11 at 13:59
    
Not much really. I've tried to intercept the handle_read and handle_write functions to no avail... I'd appreciate any pointers you might have in this regard. It would be really nice to wrap up all that ASIO stuff into an easy-to-use class. I'm prepared to put several hours into this. –  Eamorr Aug 4 '11 at 14:08
    
I've written code that does exactly this, unfortunately it belongs to the company and isn't mine to share. Not sure I can give an easy overview that would be an appropriate "answer" but I'll try. –  Chad Aug 4 '11 at 14:15
    
Oh really??? ;) Do tell... –  Eamorr Aug 4 '11 at 14:20
1  
void*. There you go. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 4 '11 at 15:56

1 Answer 1

  • onMessageReceived() can be called from handle_read.
  • onConnect() can be called from start.
  • onDisconnect() can be called in the destructor of the session class.

For the bounty questions:

The io_service.run() can be placed in its own thread.

As per the documentation

Certain guarantees are made on when the handler may be invoked, in particular that a handler can only be invoked from a thread that is currently calling run() on the corresponding io_service object.

Asynchronous sending and receiving can be handled by this single thread. This simplifies thread safety because all the callbacks will be running in succession. This is probably the simplest way of using boost asio.

For calls coming from outside of the run() thread, you can schedule a callback (e.g. deadline_timer), from the 'outside thread' for immediate calling to simplify your thread safety handling. e.g.

    boost::asio::deadline_timer timer(io_service);
    timer.expires_from_now(boost::posix_time::seconds(0));
    timer.async_wait(boost::bind(&MyClass::MyCallback, this, boost::asio::placeholders::error);

The io_service object will call the handler for you in a thread-safe fashion as soon as it has a chance. This way, your asio code can behave as if there was only a single thread in the entire system.

If multiple threads are required or preferred (e.g. Take advantage of multi-core) you may call run() on multiple thread. Handlers will have to be re-entrant. You may also want to use a strand for certain operations.

Otherwise, regular thread safety rules applies.

share|improve this answer
    
Could you be more explicit about how I would schedule a deadline_timer from the 'outside' thread? Is there any documentation on this? –  user8472 Apr 12 '13 at 8:42
    
And what is the advantage of these asynchronous calls over "regular" synchronous calls in a background thread (which is also possible to be done with boost::asio? –  user8472 Apr 12 '13 at 8:43
    
The advantage is blocking calls vs non-blocking calls. One could also decide on a different I/O strategy. There are multiple approaches and you can mix them too. I believe that would be a question on its own; See kegel.com/c10k.html –  ppl Apr 12 '13 at 12:05
1  
For example, let's take a TCP server. You would need on thread per client with the blocking calls. Otherwise if you read on a socket that the client is not writing all other clients would be delayed. This is why you use async i/o; to serve multiple clients in one thread. If your application is only a server, you would simply call the blocking run() in your main thread. Let boost asio dispatch for you. If your application is doing more then this, you can also call asio run on a different thread that will be blocked. Asio is flexible, you could also call it in multiple threads. –  ppl Apr 12 '13 at 17:28
1  
Yes, it does! I believe that you just made it clear to me what I was missing -- the explanation why these asynchronous calls are useful. In connection with the coroutines mentioned by Evgeny Panasyuk in the comment above the design actually becomes quite powerful and flexible. I would conclude that for a server with a single client the asynchronous calls are a possible solution, but are not superior to a synchronous design. For a server with multiple clients and multiple communication states, the design gets very powerful and superior. –  user8472 Apr 14 '13 at 20:23

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