Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Consider this simple program. The program has two files:

Vehicle.java:


class Vehicle {
    private int speed = 0;
    private int maxSpeed = 100;

    public int getSpeed()
    {
        return speed;
    }

    public int getMaxSpeed()
    {
        return maxSpeed;
    }

    public void speedUp(int increment)
    {
        if(speed + increment > maxSpeed){
            // throw exception
        }else{
            speed += increment;
        }
    }

    public void speedDown(int decrement)
    {
        if(speed - decrement < 0){
            // throw exception
        }else{
            speed -= decrement;
        }
    }
}

And HelloWorld.java:

public class HelloWorld {

    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Vehicle v1 = new Vehicle();
        Vehicle v2 = new Vehicle();

            // do something

            // print something useful, TODO         
        System.out.println(v1.getSpeed());
    }

}

As you can see in the first class, I have added a comment ("// throw exception") where I would like to throw an exception. Do I have to define my own class for exceptions or is there some general exception class in Java I can use?

share|improve this question
4  
You might consider not throwing an exception at all, but rather just setting the speed to zero/maximum. Why punish callers for not knowing exactly how fast a car is going in order to stop/accelerate it? –  dlev Aug 4 '11 at 13:53
3  
Consider renaming speedDown to slowDown. –  SLaks Aug 4 '11 at 13:54
    
@dlev: agreed, but it's a matter of code design. The behaviour you're proposing matches a normal car behaviour: accelerate up to limit top speed and slow down to full stop. –  Vlad Aug 4 '11 at 14:04

7 Answers 7

up vote 47 down vote accepted

You could create your own Exception class:

public class InvalidSpeedException extends Exception {

  public InvalidSpeedException(String message){
     super(message);
  }

}

In your code:

throw new InvalidSpeedException("TOO HIGH");
share|improve this answer

You could use IllegalArgumentException:

public void speedDown(int decrement)
{
    if(speed - decrement < 0){
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Final speed can not be less than zero");
    }else{
        speed -= decrement;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
See my comment to previous similar answer. Also, beware of using RuntimeExceptions since the throwing method does not declare them. –  Vlad Aug 4 '11 at 14:01

Well there are lots of exceptions to throw but here is how you throw an exception:

throw new IllegalArgumentException("INVALID");

Also yes you can create your own custom exceptions.

Edit: Also note about exceptions. When you throw an exception (like above) and you catch the exception: the String that you supply in the exception can be accessed throw the getMessage() method.

try{
    methodThatThrowsException();
}catch(IllegalArgumentException e)
{
  e.getMessage();
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Why is the argument illegal? Is there any check for argument value? Isn't the state illegal in fact (speed < 0) so he should throw an IllegalStateException? –  Vlad Aug 4 '11 at 13:58
    
Well the "State" of the object isn't illegal, the argument that was passed is illegal. (in this case decrement variable is illegal because its greater then the speed itself) –  RMT Aug 4 '11 at 13:59
1  
However you're checking the final state, not the argument's value. It's missleading. What if speed == 0 before calling speedDown? –  Vlad Aug 4 '11 at 14:08
1  
I agree with Vlad. An IllegalArgumentException should only be thrown when the argument itself is incorrect. This should be unrelated to the state of the object. But Mark is right too, it's not an IllegalStateException either... –  Fortega Aug 10 '11 at 13:46
1  
@Fortega for this situation if you don't want to create your own, IMHO I would said this is the best bet. –  RMT Aug 10 '11 at 13:48

It really depends on what you want to do with that exception after you catch it. If you need to differentiate your exception then you have to create your custom Exception. Otherwise you could just throw new Exception("message goes here");

share|improve this answer
2  
Exception is checked. I'm not sure that would be productive here. –  Mark Peters Aug 4 '11 at 13:55
    
How is a RuntimeException more productive? –  Vlad Aug 4 '11 at 14:13
    
It doesn't make the caller deal with handling an exception that represents a programming error. –  Mark Peters Aug 4 '11 at 14:15

Java has a large number of built-in exceptions for different scenarios.

In this case, you should throw an IllegalArgumentException, since the problem is that the caller passed a bad parameter.

share|improve this answer
4  
An IllegalArgumentException should only be thrown in case of an inappropriate argument, and not if an appropriate argument causes a overflow somewhere. So I would throw an IllegalArgumentException in case of a negative argument and a custom exception when the max speed is exceeded. –  Fortega Aug 4 '11 at 13:59

You can define your own exception class extending java.lang.Exception (that's for checked exception - these which must be caught), or extending java.lang.RuntimeException - these exceptions does not have to be caught. The other solution is to review Java API and finding appropriate exception describing your situation: in this particular case I think that the best one would be IllegalArgumentException.

share|improve this answer

It depends, you can throw a more general exception, or a more specific exception. For simpler methods, more general exceptions are enough. If the method is complex, then, throwing a more specific exception will be reliable.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.