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I need a singleton that:

  • is lazy loaded
  • is thread safe
  • loads some values at construction
  • those values can be queried at any time
  • the initialization MAY happen at some precise time, before the querying begins - so I must be able to trigger it from the outside somehow. Of course, triggering multiple times should only do the initialization once.

I use .NET 3.5.

I've started with Jon Skeet's implementation (5th version) using a static subclass:

public sealed class Singleton
{
    IEnumerable<string> Values {get; private set;}
    private Singleton()
    {
        Values = new[]{"quick", "brown", "fox"};
    }

    public static Singleton Instance { get { return Nested.instance; } }

    private class Nested
    {
        // Explicit static constructor to tell C# compiler
        // not to mark type as beforefieldinit
        static Nested()
        {
        }

        internal static readonly Singleton instance = new Singleton();
    }
} 

This ticks almost all the boxes, except the "trigger initialization from outside". Since the actual initialization happens inside the ctor, it can't happen more than once.

How can this be accomplished?

The singleton will be used like this:

public static void Main(){

    //do stuff, singleton should not yet be initialized.

    //the time comes to initialize the singleton, e.g. a database connection is available
    //this may be called 0 or more times, possibly on different threads

    Singleton.Initialize();
    Singleton.Initialize();
    Singleton.Initialize();

    //actual call to get retrieved values, should work
    var retrieveVals = Singleton.Instance.Values;

}
share|improve this question
1  
public static void Initialize() { Singleton instance = Instance; } Where's the problem? –  Henrik Aug 4 '11 at 14:38
    
One of your requirements is "triggering multiple times should only do the initialization once", but you state that one of the drawbacks of Jon Skeet's pattern is that initialisation "can't happen more than once". What is it that you actually need? –  LukeH Aug 4 '11 at 14:43
    
Not directly related to your question, but are you absolutely sure you need a singleton, I've only very rarely used them without causing a lot more problems than they solve. –  vickirk Aug 4 '11 at 14:55
    
@vickirk Having worked on a project where a singleton called "GlobalInstance" held references to EVERYTHING ELSE IN THE KNOWN UNIVERSE, I understand your point. However, I do tend to think this is one of the (few) cases where a singleton makes sense. –  Cristi Diaconescu Aug 4 '11 at 15:16
2  
Maybe that's because I don't quite understand your question. But simply accessing the Instance property "triggers the initialization". If you need something else, you should clarify your question. –  Henrik Aug 4 '11 at 15:56

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Seems like you could do:

public sealed class Singleton
{
    IEnumerable<string> Values {get; private set;}
    private Singleton(bool loadDefaults)
    {
        if (loadDefaults)
            Values = new[]{"quick", "brown", "fox"};
        else
            Values = new[]{"another", "set", "of", "values"};
    }

    public static Singleton Instance { get { return Nested.instance; } }

    public static void Initialize() {
        Nested.Initialize();
    }

    private class Nested
    {
        // Explicit static constructor to tell C# compiler
        // not to mark type as beforefieldinit
        static Nested()
        {
        }

        internal static readonly Singleton instance = new Singleton(true);
        private static object instanceLock = new object();
        private static bool isInitialized = false; 

        public static void Initialize() {
            lock(instanceLock) {
                if (!isInitialized) {
                    isInitialized = true;
                    instance = new Singleton(false);
                }
            }
        }

    }
} 

Or to create a single instance that will be updated:

public sealed class Singleton
{
    IEnumerable<string> Values {get; private set;}
    private Singleton()
    {
        Values = new[]{"quick", "brown", "fox"};
    }

    public static Singleton Instance { get { return Nested.instance; } }

    private static object instanceLock = new object();
    private static bool isInitialized = false; 

    public static void Initialize() {
        lock(instanceLock) {
            if (!isInitialized) {
                isInitialized = true;
                Instance.Values = new[]{"another", "set", "of", "values"};
            }
        }
    }

    private class Nested
    {
        // Explicit static constructor to tell C# compiler
        // not to mark type as beforefieldinit
        static Nested()
        {
        }

        internal static readonly Singleton instance = new Singleton();
    }
} 

And the third variation based on your immutable comment and removal of Nested class comment:

public sealed class Singleton
{
    IEnumerable<string> Values {get; private set;}
    private Singleton()
    {
        Values = new[]{"quick", "brown", "fox"};
    }

    private static Singleton instance;
    private static object instanceLock = new object();

    public static Singleton Instance {
        get {
            Initialize();
            return instance;
        }
     }

    public static void Initialize() {
        if (instance == null) {
            lock(instanceLock) {
                if (instance == null)
                    instance = new Singleton();
            }
        }
    }
} 
share|improve this answer
    
Ok, but this won't work if there are zero explicit calls to Initialize() before getting the values. I guess I should rephrase the question to take that into account. –  Cristi Diaconescu Aug 4 '11 at 14:45
    
@Cristi - I updated to load defaults until initialize is called. –  CodeNaked Aug 4 '11 at 14:49
    
I'll play devil's advocate here and complain that this is not necessarily a singleton: the first time Initialize() is called (and if the object hasn't yet been accessed), this call will create two(!) instances of Singleton. See Skeet's explanation for the 4th version of the singleton: "It's not as lazy as the other implementations. In particular, if you have static members other than Instance, the first reference to those members will involve creating the instance. This is corrected in the next implementation." In your case, the mere call of the static Initialize method calls Singleton(true) –  Cristi Diaconescu Aug 4 '11 at 15:09
    
@Cristi - That is true, you could always "update" the previous instance that was created. I can update to show that method also. –  CodeNaked Aug 4 '11 at 15:13
    
I was aiming for something immutable once it's created. I don't need different behaviour for initializing explicitly or implicitly. I just need the initialization to happen when the first Initialize() is called, or when the singleton is first accessed - whichever comes first. –  Cristi Diaconescu Aug 4 '11 at 15:24

You can set up an Initialize method that can be fired from outside, if you need the initialize to happen later, but if the values are different on each time it is fired, then it cannot be static, which violates the Singleton pattern.

Based on your example, which has no variables, I assume you are just delaying when the initialization happens (routine rather than constructor), but your question suggests you want different values, but if multiple initializations happen close together, it only initializes once, so I am a bit confused on this.

I am not sure you need a Singleton only implmentation, but cannot fully answer without information on whether or not the Initialize() runs the same code every time or has some type of variable nature.

share|improve this answer
    
Let's say the Initialize should cache some values the first time it is called. Later calls should just be ignored. –  Cristi Diaconescu Aug 4 '11 at 14:42
1  
Then it sounds like you are mixing the idea of initialization with caching. One way of solving this is separately consider the cache and get it working (separation of concerns). The cache routine should cache if empty and when the cache expires. You have to determine the method of cache expiration, as you know the ruleset. Once caching is solved, have the initialization fire the "fill cache" routine, which will short circuit immediately if cache is valid. Based on what you have in your comment, that is the direction I would consider. –  Gregory A Beamer Aug 4 '11 at 21:06

You can use double-checked locking pattern. Just add following code in you Singleton class:

public sealed class Singleton
{
   ..........................

        private static object locker = new object();
        private static bool initialized = false;

        public static void Initialize() {
           if (!initialized){ 
             lock(locker) {
                if (!initialized){ 
                  //write initialization logic here
                  initialized = true;
                 }
              }
            }
        }

.......................

}
share|improve this answer

You can do something like this

public sealed class Singleton
{
    IEnumerable<string> Values { get; set; }

    private Singleton()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("-- Private Singleton constructor");
        Values = new[] { "quick", "brown", "fox" };
    }

    public static Singleton Instance
    {
        get
        {
            Console.WriteLine("- Singleton Instance");
            return Nested.instance;
        }
    }

    public static void Initialize()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("- Singleton Initialize");
        Nested.Initialize();
    }

    internal class Nested
    {
        private static object syncRoot = new object();
        // Explicit static constructor to tell C# compiler
        // not to mark type as beforefieldinit
        static Nested()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("-- Static Nested constructor");
        }

        internal static readonly Singleton instance = new Singleton();

        internal static void Initialize()
        {
            lock (syncRoot)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("-- Locked");
                Console.WriteLine("--- Nested Initialize");
                Console.WriteLine("-- Unlocked");
            }
        }
    }
}

Usage

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var i = Singleton.Instance;
        i = Singleton.Instance;

        Console.WriteLine("-----");

        Singleton.Initialize();
        Singleton.Initialize();
        Singleton.Initialize();

        Console.Read();
    }
}

Which outputs

- Singleton Instance
-- Private Singleton constructor
-- Static Nested constructor
- Singleton Instance
-----
- Singleton Initialize
-- Locked
--- Nested Initialize
-- Unlocked
- Singleton Initialize
-- Locked
--- Nested Initialize
-- Unlocked
- Singleton Initialize
-- Locked
--- Nested Initialize
-- Unlocked
share|improve this answer
    
Why the need to lock inside Nested.Initialize() ? The actual initialization code is inside the Singleton's ctor. –  Cristi Diaconescu Aug 4 '11 at 15:12
    
@I thought you mentioned the code needs to be thread-safe, which means singleton gets access by numerous threads and one can call Initialize at the same time from different threads. If Initialize changes the state then I need to use locks. No? –  oleksii Aug 4 '11 at 15:31
    
Initialize is supposed to trigger the Singleton's ctor -- once. –  Cristi Diaconescu Aug 4 '11 at 15:45
public class Singleton<T> where T : class, new()
{
    private static T instance;
    public static T Instance
    {
        get
        {
            if (instance == null)
            {
                throw new Exception("singleton needs to be initialised before use");
            }
            return instance;
        }
    }
    public static void Initialise(Action<T> initialisationAction)
    {
        lock(typeof(Singleton<T>))
        {
            if (instance != null)
            {
                return;
            }
            instance = new T();
            initialisationAction(instance);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

The first idea I had was to just use a throwaway variable assigned to the singleton's instance, which would (probably?) trigger the initialization

static Main() 
{
    var unused = Singleton.Instance;
    //this should initialize the singleton, unless the compiler optimizes it out.
    //I wonder if the compiler is smart enough to see this call has side effects.

    var vals = Singleton.Instance.Values;
}

... but programming by side-effects is something I try hard to avoid, so let's make the intention a bit clearer.

public class Singleton {
    public static void Initialize() {
        //this accesses the static field of the inner class which triggers the private Singleton() ctor.  
        Instance._Initialize();
    }
    private void _Initialize()
    { //do nothing
    }

    [the rest as before]
}

so the usage would be:

static Main() 
{
    //still wondering if the compiler might optimize this call out
    Singleton.Initialize();

    var vals = Singleton.Instance.Values;
}

Btw this would also work:

static Main() 
{
    var vals = Singleton.Instance.Values;
}

Compiler optimization aside, I think this deals with all the requirements.

share|improve this answer

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