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How do you check if it's open or closed I was using

 if (SQLOperator.SQLCONNECTION.State.Equals("Open"))

however, even the the State is 'Open' it fails this check.

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5 Answers 5

You should be using SqlConnection.State

e.g,

if (myConnection != null && myConnection.State == ConnectionState.Closed)
{
   // do something
   // ...
}
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2  
+1 exactly - use the SqlConnectionState enum as an enum and not turn it into a string..... –  marc_s Aug 4 '11 at 15:19
1  
Hmm.. didn't you mean if (myConnection != null && ...? –  Shadow Wizard Nov 13 '12 at 20:40
    
A small question from my side, in my cshtml project i'm unable to find the ConnectionState, am I missing an using? I already got the system.data.sqlclient –  Michael Tot Korsgaard Mar 5 '13 at 15:54
    
@MichaelTotKorsgaard: Never used cshtml. Open a new SO question. –  user195488 Mar 5 '13 at 15:58

Here is what I'm using:

if (mySQLConnection.State != ConnectionState.Open)
{
    mySQLConnection.Close();
    mySQLConnection.Open();
}

The reason I'm not simply using:

if (mySQLConnection.State == ConnectionState.Closed)
{
    mySQLConnection.Open();
}

Is because the ConnectionState can also be:

Broken, Connnecting, Executing, Fetching

In addition to

Open, Closed

Additionally Microsoft states that Closing, and then Re-opening the connection "will refresh the value of State." See here http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.data.sqlclient.sqlconnection.state(v=vs.110).aspx

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You should test if mySQLConnection.State != ConnectionState.Open && mySQLConnection.State != ConnectionState.Connecting to avoid resets with slow connections, shouldn't you? –  caligari Apr 7 at 9:19
    
@caligari While true, no guarantee exists for DbConnection, so if programming to the abstract DbConnection, be careful. –  John Zabroski Apr 18 at 16:30
    
I personally think this is the kind of problem you solve by avoiding. I can maybe see the use case for this code snippet in a stateful application layer, but never on the Web? –  John Zabroski Apr 18 at 16:32
    
John, that is exactly the use case for this code. Code running a server application that could be serving pages, connecting to another REST server whatever. I don't see any case where I would connect to a server database in the client side code in a web application. –  therealjumbo Apr 18 at 21:20
    
There is one giant caveats with that: 1) with Local Storage now becoming a thing, sooner or later (already?) web apps that use local storage are going to be using a database in that storage. If not now, they will shortly. The other thing here is, my code probably isn't properly generalized to be used in a large application. My main focus is embedded programming, so I'm still learning on the server side. –  therealjumbo Apr 18 at 21:23

Check if a MySQL connection is open

ConnectionState state = connection.State;
if (state == ConnectionState.Open)
{
    return true;
}
else
{
    connection.Open();
    return true;
}
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you can also use this

if (SQLCON.State == ConnectionState.Closed)
{
     SQLCON.Open();
}
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1  
using System.Data; for anyone that didn't know, or didn't know why it wasn't working –  CodeBlend Aug 8 '13 at 9:24

I use the following manner sqlconnection.state

if(conexion.state != connectionState.open())
   conexion.open();
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4  
connectionState.open() doesn't exist; did you mean ConnectionState.Open? –  Peter Ritchie May 19 '12 at 17:51

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