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For concatenating consecutive lines, I found this posted by Kanaka and GhostDog74:

while read line; do echo -n $line; [ "${i}" ] && echo && i= || i=1 ; done < File

Works great, but I would like to modify this to concatenate the current line and the 4th line beyond it, as follows:

line1
line2
line3
line4
line5
line6
line7

line1,line4
line2,line5
line3,line6
etc.  

Any help would be much appreciated.

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1  
What is supposed to be the output for line9? line5,line9? –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 4 '11 at 21:28
    
Hello, Danny! How does it continue? (4,7) or (7,10)? –  user unknown Aug 5 '11 at 14:08

6 Answers 6

printf "%s\n" line1 line2 line3 line4 line5 line6 line7 line8  | 
awk 'NR > 3 {print prev3 ", " $0} {prev3=prev2; prev2=prev1; prev1=$0} '

produces

line1, line4
line2, line5
line3, line6
line4, line7
line5, line8
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If the data is in the file '<data file>':

tail -n +4 <data file> | paste -d ',' <data file> - | head -n -3
  • The 'tail' command removes the first 3 lines of '<data file>',
  • The 'paste' command concatenates '<data file>' with the result of 'tail' with the delimiter',' ,
  • And the 'head' command removes the last 3 lines of the 'paste' that use nothing from the 'tail'.
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This is the easier solution to understand, but it needs a file. The pure bash solution does not need a file and is more efficient because it does not need to spawn 3 processes. –  jfgagne Aug 4 '11 at 22:38
    
< and > are used for redirection. I wouldn't use them for pseudosyntax. –  user unknown Aug 4 '11 at 23:57

Also, in pure bash without needing a file:

<command that output something> | (read l1; read l2; read l3; while read l4; do echo "$l1,$l4"; l1=$l2; l2=$l3; l3=$l4; done)

Edit:

A scalable solution in pure bash (change the value of n to change the Nth line beyond that is cat with current line):

<command that output something> | (n=3; i=0; 
while [ $i -lt $n ]; do read line[$i]; i=$((i+1)); done;
while read line[$n]; do
  echo "${line[0]},${line[$n]}";
  i=0; while [ $i -lt $n ]; do line[$i]=${line[$((i+1))]}; i=$((i+1)); done;
done)
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This, in my opinion, is the best solution, but it does not scale well to concatenate with the 100th line beyond. –  jfgagne Aug 4 '11 at 22:52
    
Finally, it can scale with an array. –  jfgagne Aug 4 '11 at 23:13
    
< and > are used for redirection. I wouldn't use them for pseudosyntax. –  user unknown Aug 4 '11 at 23:57

Using an array in bash:

declare -a arr; arr=($(< line1to7))
for n in {0..3} ; do echo ${arr[n]}","${arr[$n+3]} ; done
line1,line4
line2,line5
line3,line6
line4,line7
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+1 for brace expansion that I did not know of. –  jfgagne Aug 5 '11 at 9:44

Begin Edit

A simpler solution than bellow, which is also easily modifiable to take the Nth line behond, always in sed:

<command that output something> | sed -n -e '1h;2,3H;4,${H;g;s/\n.*\n/,/;p;g;s/^[^\n]*\n//;h}'

And the explained version that can be run with sed -n -f script:

# Do not put a \n in front of the hold space for the 1st line.
1h
# For all lines except the 1st, append to the hold space.
2,$H
# From the 1st line than need to be append to another line, 4 in this case, ...
4,${
# Copy the hold space in the patter space, replace all what is between \n by ',', and print.
g
s/\n.*\n/,/
p
# Remove the 1st line from the hold space.
g
s/^[^\n]*\n//
h}

End Edit

Also, a sed solution without needing a file:

<command that output something> | sed -n -e 'H;g;s/^\n\(.*\)\n\(.*\n.*\n\)\(.*\)$/\1,\3\n\2\3/;t next;b;:next;P;s/^[^\n]*//;h'

As all cryptic sed solution, it deserves an explanation which I give in the form of a commented sed script file that can be run with sed -n -f script:

# Append current line to the hold space and copy the hold space in the pattern space.
H
g
# Now, the hold and pattern space contain '\n<line1>\n<line2>...'.
# If we can match 4 lines in the pattern space, append 1st and 4th line at the beginning of the pattern space and remove the 1st line.
# If no substitution occurs, start next cycle, else print the concatenation, remove the concatenation from the pattern space, and copy the pattern space in the hold space for next cycle.
s/^\n\(.*\)\n\(.*\n.*\n\)\(.*\)$/\1,\3\n\2\3/
t next
b
:next
P
s/^[^\n]*//
h
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If you want to concatenate with the Nth line beyond, add as much .*\n in \(.*\n.*\n\) as you need. –  jfgagne Aug 4 '11 at 22:53

I'd probably use Perl, but you could almost certainly use Python just as well.

use strict;
use warnings;
my(@lines);
while (<>)
{
    chomp;
    if (scalar @lines >= 4)
    {
        my $old = shift @lines;
        print "$old,$_\n";
    }
    push @lines, $_;
}

Given a non-standard command, range to generate lines 1 through 20, and the Perl script in xxx.pl, this yields:

$ range -f 'line%d' 1 20 | perl xxx.pl
line1,line5
line2,line6
line3,line7
line4,line8
line5,line9
line6,line10
line7,line11
line8,line12
line9,line13
line10,line14
line11,line15
line12,line16
line13,line17
line14,line18
line15,line19
line16,line20
$

If that's not what you want, you need to explain what you do want more clearly.

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