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If I have a Parallel.ForEach like this using a anonymous delegate for the main loop of the ForEach:

var someState = GetSomeState();
Parallel.ForEach(MyIEnumerableSource, 
    () =>
    {
        return new DataTable();
    },
    (record, loopState, localDataTable) =>
    {
        localDataTable.Rows.Add(someState.Value, record);
        return localDataTable
    },
    (localDataTable) =>
    {
        using (var bulkInsert = new SqlBulkCopy(ConnectionString))
        {
            bulkInsert.DestinationTableName = "My_Table";
            bulkInsert.WriteToServer(localDataTable);
        }
        localDataTable.Dispose();
    });

How can I turn it in to the following where the main loop is now a real function but is static sitting in another class:

var someState = GetSomeState();
Parallel.ForEach(MyIEnumerableSource, 
    () =>
    {
        return new DataTable();
    },
    OtherClass.Process,
    (localDataTable) =>
    {
        using (var bulkInsert = new SqlBulkCopy(ConnectionString))
        {
            bulkInsert.DestinationTableName = "My_Table";
            bulkInsert.WriteToServer(localDataTable);
        }
        localDataTable.Dispose();
    });

//In another class in another file
static class OtherClass
{
    public static DataTable Process(MyRecordType record, ParallelLoopState loopState, DataTable localDataTable)
    {
        localDataTable.Rows.Add(someState.Value, record); //How to I bring over someState when it is called here?
        return localDataTable
    }
}

How I can access that state that is created outside of the for loop and does not need to be part of the thread local storage?

I would just use a instance variable if this function was not static and resided in the same class but the main loop of the ForEach is in a static function in another class and will be used from multiple locations in the code, all with their own different copy of someState.

How do I bring that state variable along?

share|improve this question
    
Why don't you want to use an anonymous method? –  SLaks Aug 4 '11 at 15:35
    
@SLaks The code is reused frequently and we are trying to decrease code duplication (each call will have different things in the thread local initializer and finalizer and passed state but the body will stay the same.) –  Scott Chamberlain Aug 4 '11 at 15:38
    
Why don't you just call it from the anonymous method with additional state? –  SLaks Aug 4 '11 at 15:40
    
@Slaks, Ingenious! Would you write that out to a more formal solution in your answer for people who google this and don't quite understand what you mean. I did not understand that's what you meant in "Short Answer" till you said that. –  Scott Chamberlain Aug 4 '11 at 15:42

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Short answer: Call it from an anonymous method.
You can pass your additional state as separate parameter from the anonymous method.

For example:

var someState = GetSomeState();
Parallel.ForEach(MyIEnumerableSource, 

    () => new DataTable(),

    (record, loopState, localDataTable) =>
       OtherClass.Process(record, loopState, LocalDataTable, someState),

    (localDataTable) => { ... }
);

static class OtherClass
{
    public static DataTable Process(MyRecordType record, ParallelLoopState loopState, DataTable localDataTable, someStateType someState)
    {
        localDataTable.Rows.Add(someState.Value, record);
        return localDataTable
    }
}

Long answer: Make a separate class that holds the state, and put the method in that class. You can then pass the instance method, and it will have access to the state from the class that holds it.
This is how anonymous methods are compiled.

For a more thorough explanation, see my blog.

share|improve this answer
    
I added a example because I was having trouble understanding you at first, I hope that will help other people. I hope that's ok. –  Scott Chamberlain Aug 4 '11 at 15:49
    
I removed the irrelevant code from your example. You can see the full code in the history. –  SLaks Aug 4 '11 at 15:51

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