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It seems to me that an elegant way to process certain kinds of data in Node.js would be to chain processing objects, like UNIX pipes.

For example, grep:

function Grep(pattern) {
    ...
}
util.inherits(Grep, stream.Stream);

Grep.prototype.???? = ???????  // What goes here?

grep = new Grep(/foo/);

process.stdin.pipe(grep);
myStream.pipe(process.stdout);

However it's not at all clear to me how the various Stream methods need to be overridden in order for this to work.

How can I create a Stream object that simply copies from its input to its output? Presumably with that answered, more sophisticated filtering streams become trivial.

Update: it feels as if the following should work (expressed in CoffeeScript, so I don't fill this box with JS syntax!):

class Forwarder extends stream.Stream
    write: (chunk, encoding) ->
        @emit 'data', chunk
    end: (chunk, encoding) =>
        if chunk?
            @emit 'data', chunk
        @emit 'end'

fwd = new Forwarder()
fwd.pipe(process.stdout);
process.stdin.pipe(fwd);
process.stdin.resume();

However catting something to this script doesn't output anything. Calling 'fwd.write()' explicitly in the script does cause output on stdout.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You are so very close.

Because you are using the very low-level stream class, you need to set the stream writable property to make it a writable stream. If you were reading from the stream, you'd need to set the readable property. Also the end event doesn't have any arguments.

class Forwarder extends stream.Stream
  constructor: ->
    @writable = true
  write: (chunk, encoding) ->
    @emit 'data', chunk
  end: ->
    @emit 'end'

fwd = new Forwarder()
fwd.pipe(process.stdout);
process.stdin.pipe(fwd);
process.stdin.resume();

Update

The answer above applied to V1 streams in Node <= 0.8. If you are using > 0.8, Node has added more specific classes that are designed to be extended, so you would use something more like this:

class Forwarder extends stream.Transform
    _transform: (chunk, encoding, callback) ->
      this.push(chunk);
      callback();

Processing chunk and pushing the pieces you actually want.

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Bingo! I had tried using '@writable: true' as a static member; that doesn't work. But putting it in the constructor does. –  slim Aug 5 '11 at 10:19
7  
Augh! I spent quite a while debugging this because I put 'writeable' instead of 'writable'. Be sure you get the word correct! –  Pre101 Feb 13 '12 at 23:30
    
What about pause? –  B T Sep 2 '14 at 16:58
    
@BT True enough, I probably just never considered it at the time since the question only used write and end, though pause` on V1 streams was a bit weird. The V2 stream version in my update should work properly anyway, so I'm not sure it's worth worrying about now. –  loganfsmyth Sep 3 '14 at 1:25

Although the answer that exists is nice, it still requires a bit of digging around on behalf of those looking for answers.

The following code completes the example the OP gave, using the Node 0.10 stream API.

var stream = require('stream')
var util = require('util')

function Grep(pattern) {
  stream.Transform.call(this)

  this.pattern = pattern
}

util.inherits(Grep, stream.Transform)

Grep.prototype._transform = function(chunk, encoding, callback) {
  var string = chunk.toString()

  if (string.match(/foo/)) {
    this.push(chunk)
  }

  callback()
}

var grep = new Grep(/foo/)
process.stdin.pipe(grep)
grep.pipe(process.stdout)
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