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I cannot access my WCF service in IIS 6.0 when running on a VM (Windows 2003 64 bit server).I have a local IIS as well on where I developed the service, and I can access my service fine over there. I built a deployment package and deployed it to the VM, however I just cannot get to it.

Particulars about the WCF service:

1 - Its REST based 2 - Using SSL

If I place a static HTML file in the directory where my service.svc file is, I am able to access that but I cannot access the service.svc file. I am doing all this using IE.

So for instance

Any help would be appreciated it. Thanks.

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1 Answer 1

Couple of things to check:

  1. ASP.NET is installed properly and is registered for IIS (aspnet_regiis -i). Best way is not to use a static file, but an .aspx file to see if the asp.net runtime is running.
  2. Verify you are running a 64-bit binary for the wcf service. If you copied if from a local 32-bit OS, you might need to recompile it for 64-bit.
  3. Did you use https localy also? if not, try to change the configuration of the service to use http (without ssl), check that it works, and then understand what is the required configuration for https.
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1 - This might be the issue. I could not access an ASPX file I placed in the folder. I tried registering though it complained about IIS being in 64 but mode and aspnet_regiis.exe is a 32 bit application. 2 - I'm running a 64 bit binary. I made sure of that. 3 - Used HTTPS locally also. –  Pappy Aug 4 '11 at 19:41
    
Ok ... I ran the 64 bit version of aspnet_regiis.exe and it went fine. However I still could not access my ASPX file. –  Pappy Aug 4 '11 at 19:48
    
Turns out I needed to enable ASPX in the Web extensions in IIS. –  Pappy Aug 11 '11 at 15:57

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