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How to pad numbers with underscores in Java, instead of the usual zeros ?

For example I want

  • 123.45 to be formated to ___123.45 and
  • 12345.67 to be formated to _12345.67
  • 0.12 to be formated to ______.12

I tried lots of stuff and closest I got was this (by using SYMBOLS.setZeroDigit('_');):

import java.text.DecimalFormat;
import java.text.DecimalFormatSymbols;

public class Example {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        DecimalFormatSymbols SYMBOLS = new DecimalFormatSymbols();
        SYMBOLS.setDecimalSeparator('.');
        SYMBOLS.setGroupingSeparator(',');
        DecimalFormat OUTPUT_FORMAT = new DecimalFormat("000,000.00", SYMBOLS);

        System.out.println(OUTPUT_FORMAT.format(0.01));
        // got 000,000.01
        System.out.println(OUTPUT_FORMAT.format(0.12));
        // got 000,000.12
        System.out.println(OUTPUT_FORMAT.format(123456));
        // got 123,456.00
        System.out.println(OUTPUT_FORMAT.format(123456.78));
        // got 123,456.78
        System.out.println(OUTPUT_FORMAT.format(1234));
        // got 001,234.00
        System.out.println(OUTPUT_FORMAT.format(1234.56));
        // got 001,234.56

        SYMBOLS.setZeroDigit('_');
        OUTPUT_FORMAT = new DecimalFormat("000,000.00", SYMBOLS);
        System.out.println(OUTPUT_FORMAT.format(0.01));
        // expected ______._1 but got ___,___._`
        System.out.println(OUTPUT_FORMAT.format(0.12));
        // expected ______.12 but got ___,___.`a
        System.out.println(OUTPUT_FORMAT.format(123456));
        // expected 123,456.__ but got `ab,cde.__
        System.out.println(OUTPUT_FORMAT.format(123456.78));
        // expected 123,456.78 but got `ab,cde.fg
        System.out.println(OUTPUT_FORMAT.format(1234));
        // expected __1,234.00 or at least __1,234.__ but got __`,abc.__
        System.out.println(OUTPUT_FORMAT.format(1234.56));
        // expected __1,234.56 but got __`,abc.de
    }

}

Well, not really close but an empty number if formated right (with trailing underscores): ___,___.__

Anyway, suggestions on how to get the expected behaviour?

share|improve this question
    
DecimalFormatSymbols.setZeroDigit is used to set the character to represent zero and all other digits following it. ` follows _ and that's why you are seeing ___,___._`` instead of ___,___._1` Edit: the formatting doesn't work but you get the point I suppose. –  Vineet Reynolds Aug 4 '11 at 17:12
    
yes, i know how setZeroDigit works but i was asking for a workaround to achieve the expected –  Belun Aug 5 '11 at 14:42
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3 Answers

"_________".substring( num.length() )+num;

where num is a String holding your number. To convert a double to a String, you can use Double.toString(myDouble).

share|improve this answer
1  
Unfortunately Double.toString( myDouble ) yields 123456.78 instead of 123,456.78 –  OscarRyz Aug 4 '11 at 17:28
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You can use the StringUtils.leftPad() method from the Apache Commons library.

// pad to 10 chars
String padded = StringUtils.leftPad("123.456", 10, '_');
// padded will be equal to "___123.456"
share|improve this answer
1  
what about 0.01 who should be padded to ______._1 ? –  Belun Aug 5 '11 at 7:11
1  
@Belun You are right, the only way to achieve the asker's requirement is to develop a user method. –  Marcelo Aug 5 '11 at 13:36
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Da daaa

import java.text.DecimalFormat;

class F { 
  public static void main( String ... args ) { 
    DecimalFormat f = new DecimalFormat("000,000.00");
    for( double d : new double[]{ 0.01, 0.12, 123456, 123456.78, 1234, 1234.56 }){ 
      System.out.println( 
        f.format(d).replaceAll("0","_").replaceAll("_,_","__")
      );
    }
  }
}

Output:

______._1
______.12
123,456.__
123,456.78
__1,234.__
__1,234.56

Probably the replacement could be done in one step but I'll let that to you.

share|improve this answer
2  
This will not work with numbers like 1230.45 or 1234.05 –  Marcelo Aug 4 '11 at 17:26
    
I'm not sure Marcelo, the OP for instance expects _____._1 for 0.01 and not ______.01 . From the original question I took the "expected ..." and test it with assertions. Look here: gist.github.com/1125723 So, as per the OP expectations this code does what is needed. –  OscarRyz Aug 4 '11 at 17:42
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