Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a simple Javascript function which builds a Url that I want to provide a link to.

However, I can't seem to get the anchor tag working with it. How do I assign the href of the anchor tag the results of the Javascript function?

Neither one of these work correctly:

<a href="getUrl();">Click here</a>
<a href="javascript:getUrl();">Click here</a>

This is what I want to accomplish.

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted
<script type="text/javascript">
    function getUrl()
    {
        return "http://www.google.com";
    }
</script>
<a href="javascript:document.location.href=getUrl();">Click here</a>

-- update --

If I wanted to incorporate user278064s' comments, i would change the above into:

  <script type="text/javascript">
        function getUrl()
        {
            return "http://www.google.com";
        }
    </script>
    <a href="#" onClick="document.location.href=getUrl();">Click here</a>
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you micha, this works as I need it to! –  Mike Aug 4 '11 at 19:30
    
is one of these considered to be better practice? –  miss.serena Sep 24 '14 at 0:00
    
@miss.serena: Neither would win a beauty contest, but the 2nd one would be considered better back in the days. Because it keeps your statusbar more clean, without resorting to onMouseOver/onMouseOut code which rewrites the status bar. But who uses the status bar anyway these days? ;) –  micha Nov 26 '14 at 21:14
<a onclick="getUrl();" href="#">Click here</a>

Click Here

share|improve this answer
1  
This does absolutely nothing. –  Mike Aug 4 '11 at 19:23

Give the link an id:

<a id="specialLink">Click Here</a>

Later on, set its href from JavaScript:

document.getElementById('specialLink').href = getUrl();

(You might want to include a placeholder href in the link which people with JavaScript disabled will see.)

share|improve this answer
    
What does 'later on' mean? When the page loads, I want this link's href to point to the correct location so that when the link is clicked it takes the user to where I want them to go. There really is no 'later on'. –  Mike Aug 4 '11 at 19:27
    
@Mike “later on” just means “in any JavaScript which runs after the link on the page”. It could be a JavaScript file included at the end of the document, a function that runs when the page is ready, or a <script> block that you put just below the link. –  Sidnicious Aug 5 '11 at 0:28
function getUrl(that) {
   return "www.whateveryouwant.com";
}

// Point the a.href attribute at your url.
var a = document.getElementsByTagName('a')[0];
a.href = getUrl();

UPDATE

I assume that you want to use the getUrl() method to set the href attribute, because probably the pointed url is not static (so it could change at any moment e point to the getUrl() returned url.)

Anyway, you could assign the href attribute, when i.e. the user click on the link, in this way.

function changeHref(aElem) {
   aElem.href = getUrl();
}

Following the complete code:

<a href="#" onclick="changeHref(this);">click me!</a>

<script>
   function getUrl(that) {
      return "www.whateveryouwant.com";
   }

   function changeHref(aElem) {
      aElem.href = getUrl();
   }
</script>

One other thing. You should avoid the use of javascript: pseudo-protocol.

This fragment will explain you why:

A pseudo-protocol is a nonstandard take on this idea. The javascript: pseudo-protocol is supposed to be used to invoke JavaScript from within a link. Here’s how the javascript: pseudo-protocol would be used to call the popUp function:

<a href="javascript:popUp('http://www.example.com/');">Example</a>

This will work just fine in browsers that understand the javascript: pseudo-protocol. Older browsers, however, will attempt to follow the link and fail. Even in browsers that understand the pseudoprotocol, the link becomes useless if JavaScript has been disabled. In short, using the javascript: pseudo-protocol is usually a very bad way of referencing JavaScript from within your markup.

DOM Scripting: Web Design with JavaScript and the Document Object Model: Second Edition

share|improve this answer
    
I don't understand where the function should be called from. When the page loads, I want the link to contain the proper address in the href. Where does the code which you have outside of the function definition go? How does the <a href=???> get assigned? –  Mike Aug 4 '11 at 19:30

None of the above solutions worked for me. A good way would be to create a new link in the function.

function fetchURL() {
  var title = "Download";
  var URL = title.link("https://www.google.com");
  document.getElementById("dynamicButton").innerHTML = URL;

}
<body onload="fetchURL()">
  <div id="dynamicButton">
    //empty
  </div>

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.