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I have a pointer to a vector. Now, how can I read the contents of the vector through pointer? I know this is a basic question, but Im unable to find an answer for the same.(C++)

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2  
What have you tried so far? Can you provide some code, so we can have something concrete to talk about? –  Nate Aug 4 '11 at 17:56
    
Are you sure you want to use a pointer to a vector? It might make more sense to use a reference. See my post below. –  arasmussen Aug 4 '11 at 18:27

7 Answers 7

up vote 16 down vote accepted

There are many solutions, here's a few I've come up with:

int main(int nArgs, char ** vArgs)
{
    vector<int> *v = new vector<int>(10);
    v->at(2); //Retrieve using pointer to member
    v->operator[](2); //Retrieve using pointer to operator member
    v->size(); //Retrieve size
    vector<int> &vr = *v; //Create a reference
    vr[2]; //Normal access through reference
    delete &vr; //Delete the reference. You could do the same with
                //a pointer (but not both!)
}
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The reference part is bad advice, since new could return 0. –  Don Reba Aug 4 '11 at 18:12
    
@Don Reba - Not really; on most compilers an exception is thrown: stackoverflow.com/questions/550451/… –  Schnommus Aug 4 '11 at 18:14
    
Also, if new did return 0, all the operations on pointers would be bad, not just the reference initialization. –  Schnommus Aug 4 '11 at 18:18

Access it like any other pointer value:

std::vector<int>* v = new std::vector<int>();

v->push_back(0);
v->push_back(12);
v->push_back(1);

int twelve = v->at(1);
int one = (*v)[2];

// iterate it
for(std::vector<int>::const_iterator cit = v->begin(), e = v->end; 
    cit != e;  ++cit)
{
    int value = *cit;
}

// or, more perversely
for(int x = 0; x < v->size(); ++x)
{
    int value = (*v)[x];
}
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vector<int> v;
v.push_back(906);
vector<int> * p = &v;
cout << (*p)[0] << endl;
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You can access the iterator methods directly:

std::vector<int> *intVec;
std::vector<int>::iterator it;

for( it = intVec->begin(); it != intVec->end(); ++it )
{
}

If you want the array-access operator, you'd have to de-reference the pointer. For example:

std::vector<int> *intVec;

int val = (*intVec)[0];
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Do you have a pointer to a vector because that's how you've coded it? You may want to reconsider this and use a (possibly const) reference. For example:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

void foo(vector<int>* a)
{
    cout << a->at(0) << a->at(1) << a->at(2) << endl;
    // expected result is "123"
}

int main()
{
    vector<int> a;
    a.push_back(1);
    a.push_back(2);
    a.push_back(3);

    foo(&a);
}

While this is a valid program, the general C++ style is to pass a vector by reference rather than by pointer. This will be just as efficient, but then you don't have to deal with possibly null pointers and memory allocation/cleanup, etc. Use a const reference if you aren't going to modify the vector, and a non-const reference if you do need to make modifications.

Here's the references version of the above program:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

void foo(const vector<int>& a)
{
    cout << a[0] << a[1] << a[2] << endl;
    // expected result is "123"
}

int main()
{
    vector<int> a;
    a.push_back(1);
    a.push_back(2);
    a.push_back(3);

    foo(a);
}

As you can see, all of the information contained within a will be passed to the function foo, but it will not copy an entirely new value, since it is being passed by reference. It is therefore just as efficient as passing by pointer, and you can use it as a normal value rather than having to figure out how to use it as a pointer or having to dereference it.

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This may be a stupid comment. But since you only use the at method, are there any advantages to use the syntax (*a)[1]? Personally I like that since I thinn it reflects my i tentions better and this makes it easier for me to read the code (with advantages I mean significant performance increase for at least one case) –  patrik Oct 2 at 22:34

There are a lot of solutions. For example you can use at() method.

*I assumed that you a looking for equivalent to [] operator.

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but how to know the number of elements in the vector? –  Pavan Aug 4 '11 at 17:58
    
@user815961 v->size() returns the number of elements in the vector –  Praetorian Aug 4 '11 at 17:59

The easiest way use it as array is use vector::data() member.

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1  
The reason you use a vector is to abstract away the underlying implementation (contiguous array) behind it. This is going against object oriented principles, not to mention extremely inefficient because you are allocating an entire new array of size n, when you could just use vec->at(index). Not to mention, this has absolutely nothing to do with the original poster's question because you aren't using a pointer to a vector anywhere. –  arasmussen Aug 4 '11 at 18:25
    
I was just giving out an example, if we want to know the underlying type, we can use vector::value_type. but it's statically interpreted. the whole point I wanted to convey is data() is the member to get the underlying pointer. And that's what his question was. –  sarat Aug 4 '11 at 18:49

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