Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm in the process of implementing a notification service. Essentially, customers can get notified in a number of ways, such as via email, text message, fax etc. Below is a rough implementation that is not wired together.

public class NotificationService
{
    private readonly INotification _notification;
    private readonly INotificationFormatter _formatter;

    public NotificationService(
        INotificationMethod notification, 
        INotificationFormatter formatter)
    {
        _notification = notification;
        _formatter = formatter;
    }

    public void Notify(SomeParameterObject obj)
    {
        var formattedMessage = _formatter.Format(obj);
        _notification.SendNotification(formattedMessage);
    }
}

public interface INotificationFormatter
{
    NotificationMessage Format(SomeParameterObject obj);
}

public interface INotification
{
    void SendNotification();
}

public EmailNotification : INotification
{
    public void SendNotification(NotificationMessage message)
    {
        // Use Exchange Web Services to send email
    }
}

The NotificationService class essentially takes in a method of notification and a formatter. Obviously, each method of notification requires different formatting.

Based on business criteria, how do I select which implementation of INotification and NotificationFormatter I wish to use? Note that within the lifetime of the user using the application each notification will most likely be used. I say this because it's not as simple as instructing my container to inject implementation Foobar as it will change while the user is using the application.

I've thought of creating some sort of class that could handle pairs because it seems to makes sense to me that you wouldn't want use a text message notification formatter for a fax notification. However, I can't seem to wrap my head around a decent implementation of this.

I also own the book Dependency Injection in .NET by Mark Seemann. Did I perhaps miss something obvious?

Thank you.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What you need to do is to provide some kind of configuration infrastructure. For example, assuming that you want to keep the service just the way you've defined it, I would implement a factory returning an instance of NotificationService according to your model:

public struct NotificaitonSettings<T>
{
    public Predicate<T> Predicate;
    public NotificationService Service;
}

public class NotificationServiceFactory<T> : INotificationServiceFactory<T>
{
    protected static List<NotificaitonSettings<T>> settings = new List<NotificaitonSettings<T>>();

    static NotificationServiceFactory()
    {
        settings.Add(new NotificaitonSettings<T>
        {
            Predicate = m => !String.IsNullOrEmpty(m.Email),
            Service = new NotificationService(new EmailNotification(), new EmailFormatter())
        });
        settings.Add(new NotificaitonSettings<T>
        {
            Predicate = m => !String.IsNullOrEmpty(m.Fax),
            Service = new NotificationService(new FaxNotification(), new FaxFormatter())
        });
    }

    public NotificationService Create(T model)
    {
        return settings.FirstOrDefault(s => s.Predicate(model)).Service;
    }
}

This implementation configures the factory using static list, you could use a IoC container if it supports this kind of operations.

share|improve this answer
    
Woah I believe this is an excellent idea. Hopefully I'll have time today to play with this idea. –  gcso Aug 5 '11 at 11:41

How is it that you decide what kind of notification a user wants? If it can change while they're using your app, it seems like the NotificationService for that user msut be created anew for each notification you want to send them. That's ok - just use some sort of lookup to select a INotification impelmentation with an IoC container.

IoC's (I use AutoFac) let you use string-indexes to select a specific implementation. That string could come from a DB or whatever to represent the user's preference. Then you'd pass it to your IoC asking for an INotification 'decorated' with your string-choice. Upon startup, all the various implementations are registered with thier choice-strings.

I think you may be on to something with your 'pairs' comment - if INotificationFormat is closely tied to INotification and there is a possiblity of mixing them up then perhaps the INotification implementation itself should select its formatter.

share|improve this answer
    
The type of notification to use is solely dependant on specific fields in the model. So say our model contains a fax number, it should use a fax notification. If our model contains both a fax number and email address then we'd most likely use two types of notifications. Our business requirements aren't quite complete. –  gcso Aug 4 '11 at 18:06
    
And I now see how to use string matching (or string-indexes) for parameters. Perhaps if I used my idea of pairs then a constructor signature might look like EmailNotification(INotifier emailNotifier, IFormatter emailFormatter). With that in place wire emailNotifier to inject an instance of EmailNotifier and use the same logic to inject the proper instance of IFormatter. –  gcso Aug 4 '11 at 18:11
    
Although, I think you're on the right track with the string-indexes. I believe that with this pair idea all I would need to create is a factory that would decide which notification instance to use. –  gcso Aug 4 '11 at 18:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.