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I'm working in R. I have a dataframe, df that looks like this:

> str(exp)
'data.frame':   691200 obs. of  19 variables:
 $ groupname: Factor w/ 8 levels "rowA","rowB",..: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ...
 $ location : Factor w/ 96 levels "c1","c10","c11",..: 1 2 3 4 12 23 34 45 56 67 ...
 $ starttime: num  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...
 $ inadist  : num  0 0.2 0 0.2 0.6 0 0 0 0 0 ...
 $ smldist  : num  0 2.1 0 1.8 1.2 0 0 0 0 3.3 ...
 $ lardist  : num  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.3 ...
 $ fPhase   : Factor w/ 2 levels "Light","Dark": 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 ...
 $ fCycle   : Factor w/ 6 levels "predark","Cycle 1",..: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ...

I'd like to add another column, timepoint, that gives the starttime relative to the beginning of the fCycle it is in. So starttime=1801 would be timepoint=1 for fCycle='Cycle 1'.

What is the best way to create df$timepoint?

ETA toy dataset:

starttime fCycle timepoint
1         1      1
2         1      2
3         1      3
4         1      4
5         2      1
6         2      2
7         2      3
8         2      4
9         3      1
10        3      2
11        3      3
12        4      1
13        4      2
14        4      3
15        5      1
16        5      2
17        6      1
18        6      2
19        6      3
20        6      4
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You might want to clarify what you want to do using a toy data set , as explained in this question. Right now I have no idea what starttime is, and the only thing I can think of is df$timepoint <- 1 (as I assume the starttime is equal for every observation within a cycle). –  Joris Meys Aug 4 '11 at 18:19
    
@Joris Meys: I've added some example data. The idea is that I should be able to compare measurements at the same offset from the beginning of any cycle. –  dnagirl Aug 4 '11 at 18:30
    
Just to clarify, what if fCycle[c(21,22)]=c(1,1)? Is the timepoint now (1,2)? Or are cycles monotonically increasing? –  Iterator Aug 4 '11 at 18:32
1  
@Iterator: at the moment the dataframe is sorted by groupname, then location, then starttime. So there are 96 rows where starttime=0, then 96 where starttime=1, etc. The fCycles were assigned using ranges of starttimes, e.g. predark is where starttime<=1800. Does this answer your question? –  dnagirl Aug 4 '11 at 18:42
    
@dnagirl : It doesn't. If you have two observations with the same starttime in the same fCycle, do they have the same timepoint or different ones? –  Joris Meys Aug 4 '11 at 19:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can combine rle with sequence. Here is some sample code. Is the output what you were looking for?

require(plyr)

mydf = data.frame(
  starttime = 1:20,
  fCycle    = c(rep(1:3, each = 4), rep(4:5, each = 3), rep(6, 2))
)

# sort data in increasing order of cycle and starttime
mydf = arrange(mydf, fCycle, starttime)

mydf = transform(mydf, timepoint = sequence(rle(fCycle)$lengths))

NOTE: In the light of the fact that there could be identical starttimes within the same fCycle, here is an alternate approach using rank and ddply

# treat same starttimes in an fcycle identically
ddply(mydf, .(fCycle), transform, timepoint = rank(starttime, ties = 'min'))

# treat same starttimes in an fcycle using average
ddply(mydf, .(fCycle), transform, timepoint = rank(starttime, ties = 'average'))
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Good use of sequence. Just a note: a , seems to be missing at the end of the the starttime declaration. –  Iterator Aug 4 '11 at 19:05
    
+1 Seconded.... –  Andrie Aug 4 '11 at 19:06
    
@Iterator. thanks. i fixed the , –  Ramnath Aug 4 '11 at 19:07
    
I'm afraid that doesn't fit the original data. There you have multiple starttimes that have the same value, see also the comments. Your code would result in erroneous timepoints. –  Joris Meys Aug 4 '11 at 19:23
1  
@Ramnath : See the comments on OP's question. Arrange does indeed only take care of one part. –  Joris Meys Aug 4 '11 at 19:32

This is an outline of a solution, because I'm not quite clear on what you're asking. It seems like you're asking for something derived from run length encoding (RLE), which can begin via the rle() function.

  1. The rle() output will give the lengths of each run (assign this lengths).
  2. The offsets where each run occurs can be calculated (via cumsum(c(1,lengths))).
  3. These can then be rep (repeated) a sufficient # of times (i.e. for each item in the run).
  4. For each position (1:n) simply subtract the location of the start of the run.

EDIT: There's no need to use rep in step 3. It can be a lookup to the lengths.

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