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I've just recently discovered the functional programming style and I'm convinced that it will reduce development efforts, make code easier to read, make software more maintainable. However, the problem is I sucked at convincing anyone.

Well, recently I was given a chance to give a talk on how to reduce software development and maintenance efforts, and I wanted to introduce them the concept of functional programming and how it benefit the team. I had this idea of showing people 2 set of code that does exactly the same thing, one coded in a very imperative way, and the other in a very functional way, to show that functional programming can made code way shorter, easier to understand and thus maintainable. Is there such an example, beside the famous sum of squares example by Luca Bolognese?

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Would someone be able to provide link to where to find "the famous sum of squares example by Luca Bolognese"? Thanks –  Sung Mar 29 '09 at 21:20
4  
Luca's talk: channel9.msdn.com/pdc2008/TL11 –  Brian Mar 31 '09 at 1:57
    
It really is a great talk. –  Robert Jeppesen Oct 23 '10 at 21:38

15 Answers 15

up vote 48 down vote accepted

I've just recently discovered the functional programming style [...] Well, recently I was given a chance to give a talk on how to reduce software development efforts, and I wanted to introduce the concept of functional programming.

If you've only just discovered functional programming, I do not recommend trying to speak authoritatively on the subject. I know for the first 6 months while I was learnig F#, all of my code was just C# with a little more awkward syntax. However, after that period of time, I was able to write consistently good code in an idiomatic, functional style.

I recommend that you do the same: wait for 6 months or so until functional programming style comes more naturally, then give your presentation.

I'm trying to illustrate the benefits of functional programming, and I had the idea of showing people 2 set of code that does the same thing, one coded in a very imperative way, and the other in a very functional way, to show that functional programming can made code way shorter, easier to understand and thus maintain. Is there such example, beside the famous sum of squares example by Luca Bolognese?

I gave an F# presentation to the .NET users group in my area, and many people in my group were impressed by F#'s pattern matching. Specifically, I showed how to traverse an abstract syntax tree in C# and F#:

using System;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    public interface IExprVisitor<t>
    {
        t Visit(TrueExpr expr);
        t Visit(And expr);
        t Visit(Nand expr);
        t Visit(Or expr);
        t Visit(Xor expr);
        t Visit(Not expr);

    }

    public abstract class Expr
    {
        public abstract t Accept<t>(IExprVisitor<t> visitor);
    }

    public abstract class UnaryOp : Expr
    {
        public Expr First { get; private set; }
        public UnaryOp(Expr first)
        {
            this.First = first;
        }
    }

    public abstract class BinExpr : Expr
    {
        public Expr First { get; private set; }
        public Expr Second { get; private set; }

        public BinExpr(Expr first, Expr second)
        {
            this.First = first;
            this.Second = second;
        }
    }

    public class TrueExpr : Expr
    {
        public override t Accept<t>(IExprVisitor<t> visitor)
        {
            return visitor.Visit(this);
        }
    }

    public class And : BinExpr
    {
        public And(Expr first, Expr second) : base(first, second) { }
        public override t Accept<t>(IExprVisitor<t> visitor)
        {
            return visitor.Visit(this);
        }
    }

    public class Nand : BinExpr
    {
        public Nand(Expr first, Expr second) : base(first, second) { }
        public override t Accept<t>(IExprVisitor<t> visitor)
        {
            return visitor.Visit(this);
        }
    }

    public class Or : BinExpr
    {
        public Or(Expr first, Expr second) : base(first, second) { }
        public override t Accept<t>(IExprVisitor<t> visitor)
        {
            return visitor.Visit(this);
        }
    }

    public class Xor : BinExpr
    {
        public Xor(Expr first, Expr second) : base(first, second) { }
        public override t Accept<t>(IExprVisitor<t> visitor)
        {
            return visitor.Visit(this);
        }
    }

    public class Not : UnaryOp
    {
        public Not(Expr first) : base(first) { }
        public override t Accept<t>(IExprVisitor<t> visitor)
        {
            return visitor.Visit(this);
        }
    }

    public class EvalVisitor : IExprVisitor<bool>
    {
        public bool Visit(TrueExpr expr)
        {
            return true;
        }

        public bool Visit(And expr)
        {
            return Eval(expr.First) && Eval(expr.Second);
        }

        public bool Visit(Nand expr)
        {
            return !(Eval(expr.First) && Eval(expr.Second));
        }

        public bool Visit(Or expr)
        {
            return Eval(expr.First) || Eval(expr.Second);
        }

        public bool Visit(Xor expr)
        {
            return Eval(expr.First) ^ Eval(expr.Second);
        }

        public bool Visit(Not expr)
        {
            return !Eval(expr.First);
        }

        public bool Eval(Expr expr)
        {
            return expr.Accept(this);
        }
    }

    public class PrettyPrintVisitor : IExprVisitor<string>
    {
        public string Visit(TrueExpr expr)
        {
            return "True";
        }

        public string Visit(And expr)
        {
            return string.Format("({0}) AND ({1})", expr.First.Accept(this), expr.Second.Accept(this));
        }

        public string Visit(Nand expr)
        {
            return string.Format("({0}) NAND ({1})", expr.First.Accept(this), expr.Second.Accept(this));
        }

        public string Visit(Or expr)
        {
            return string.Format("({0}) OR ({1})", expr.First.Accept(this), expr.Second.Accept(this));
        }

        public string Visit(Xor expr)
        {
            return string.Format("({0}) XOR ({1})", expr.First.Accept(this), expr.Second.Accept(this));
        }

        public string Visit(Not expr)
        {
            return string.Format("Not ({0})", expr.First.Accept(this));
        }

        public string Pretty(Expr expr)
        {
            return expr.Accept(this).Replace("(True)", "True");
        }
    }

    class Program
    {
        static void TestLogicalEquivalence(Expr first, Expr second)
        {
            var prettyPrinter = new PrettyPrintVisitor();
            var eval = new EvalVisitor();
            var evalFirst = eval.Eval(first);
            var evalSecond = eval.Eval(second);

            Console.WriteLine("Testing expressions:");
            Console.WriteLine("    First  = {0}", prettyPrinter.Pretty(first));
            Console.WriteLine("        Eval(First):  {0}", evalFirst);
            Console.WriteLine("    Second = {0}", prettyPrinter.Pretty(second));
            Console.WriteLine("        Eval(Second): {0}", evalSecond);;
            Console.WriteLine("    Equivalent? {0}", evalFirst == evalSecond);
            Console.WriteLine();
        }

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var P = new TrueExpr();
            var Q = new Not(new TrueExpr());

            TestLogicalEquivalence(P, Q);

            TestLogicalEquivalence(
                new Not(P),
                new Nand(P, P));

            TestLogicalEquivalence(
                new And(P, Q),
                new Nand(new Nand(P, Q), new Nand(P, Q)));

            TestLogicalEquivalence(
                new Or(P, Q),
                new Nand(new Nand(P, P), new Nand(Q, Q)));

            TestLogicalEquivalence(
                new Xor(P, Q),
                new Nand(
                    new Nand(P, new Nand(P, Q)),
                    new Nand(Q, new Nand(P, Q)))
                );

            Console.ReadKey(true);
        }
    }
}

The code above is written in an idiomatic C# style. It uses the visitor pattern rather than type-testing to guarantee type safety. This is about 218 LOC.

Here's the F# version:

#light
open System

type expr =
    | True
    | And of expr * expr
    | Nand of expr * expr
    | Or of expr * expr
    | Xor of expr * expr
    | Not of expr

let (^^) p q = not(p && q) && (p || q) // makeshift xor operator

let rec eval = function
    | True          -> true
    | And(e1, e2)   -> eval(e1) && eval(e2)
    | Nand(e1, e2)  -> not(eval(e1) && eval(e2))
    | Or(e1, e2)    -> eval(e1) || eval(e2)
    | Xor(e1, e2)   -> eval(e1) ^^ eval(e2)
    | Not(e1)       -> not(eval(e1))

let rec prettyPrint e =
    let rec loop = function
        | True          -> "True"
        | And(e1, e2)   -> sprintf "(%s) AND (%s)" (loop e1) (loop e2)
        | Nand(e1, e2)  -> sprintf "(%s) NAND (%s)" (loop e1) (loop e2)
        | Or(e1, e2)    -> sprintf "(%s) OR (%s)" (loop e1) (loop e2)
        | Xor(e1, e2)   -> sprintf "(%s) XOR (%s)" (loop e1) (loop e2)
        | Not(e1)       -> sprintf "NOT (%s)" (loop e1)
    (loop e).Replace("(True)", "True")

let testLogicalEquivalence e1 e2 =
    let eval1, eval2 = eval e1, eval e2
    printfn "Testing expressions:"
    printfn "    First  = %s" (prettyPrint e1)
    printfn "        eval(e1): %b" eval1
    printfn "    Second = %s" (prettyPrint e2)
    printfn "        eval(e2): %b" eval2
    printfn "    Equilalent? %b" (eval1 = eval2)
    printfn ""

let p, q = True, Not True
let tests =
    [
        p, q;

        Not(p), Nand(p, p);

        And(p, q),
            Nand(Nand(p, q), Nand(p, q));

        Or(p, q),
            Nand(Nand(p, p), Nand(q, q));

        Xor(p, q),
            Nand(
                    Nand(p, Nand(p, q)),
                    Nand(q, Nand(p, q))
                )
    ]
tests |> Seq.iter (fun (e1, e2) -> testLogicalEquivalence e1 e2)

Console.WriteLine("(press any key)")
Console.ReadKey(true) |> ignore

This is 65 LOC. Since it uses pattern matching rather than the visitor pattern, we don't lose any type-safety, and the code is very easy to read.

Any kind of symbolic processing is orders of magnitude easier to write in F# than C#.

[Edit to add:] Oh, and pattern matching isn't just a replacement for the visitor pattern, it also allows you to match against the shape of data. For example, here's a function which converts Nand's to their equivalents:

let rec simplify = function
    | Nand(p, q) when p = q -> Not(simplify p)
    | Nand(Nand(p1, q1), Nand(p2, q2))
        when equivalent [p1; p2] && equivalent [q1; q2]
                    -> And(simplify p1, simplify q1)
    | Nand(Nand(p1, p2), Nand(q1, q2))
        when equivalent [p1; p2] && equivalent [q1; q2]
                    -> Or(simplify p1, simplify q1)
    | Nand(Nand(p1, Nand(p2, q1)), Nand(q2, Nand(p3, q3)))
        when equivalent [p1; p2; p3] && equivalent [q1; q2; q3]
                    -> Xor(simplify p1, simplify q1)
    | Nand(p, q) -> Nand(simplify p, simplify q)
    | True          -> True
    | And(p, q)     -> And(simplify p, simplify q)
    | Or(p, q)      -> Or(simplify p, simplify q)
    | Xor(p, q)     -> Xor(simplify p, simplify q)
    | Not(Not p)    -> simplify p
    | Not(p)        -> Not(simplify p)

Its not possible to write this code concisely at all in C#.

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What does let rec loop = function mean? I understand that it is declaration of recursive function, but what does the function keyword mean here? Is it some simple way to declare a function that takes single parameter with pattern matching on this single parameter? (hence we omit parameter name and match keyword) –  Dmitry Lobanov Aug 19 '11 at 9:34
    
@DmitryLobanov I means the same as let rec loop = match loop with –  user522860 Sep 28 '11 at 15:01
    
@CheckMate9500 you mean let rec loop x = match x with... –  Mauricio Scheffer Feb 28 '12 at 22:46
    
There is a much better way to do that in c# gist.github.com/3219856 –  hodzanassredin Aug 1 '12 at 19:58

There are plenty examples out there but none will be as impact full as using a sample relevant to one of your projects at work. Examples like "Sum Of Squares" by Luca are awesome but if someone used that as proof as to how our code base could be written better I would not be convinced. All the example proves is some things are better wrote functionally. What you need to prove is your code base is better written functionally

My advice would be to pick some popular trouble spots and some core spots in the code base, and rewrite them in a functional style. If you can demonstrate a substantially better solution, it will go a long way to winning over co-workers.

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This is a good challenge, and often easier said than done. –  Robert Jeppesen Oct 23 '10 at 21:42

Tasks for functional style? Any time you have a common coding pattern and want to reduce it. A while ago I wrote a bit on using C# for functional style, while making sure it's practical: Practical Functional C# (I'm hesitate to link to my own stuff here, but I think it's relevant in this case). If you have a common "enterprise" application, showing, say, how expressions are lovely in pattern matching won't be too convincing.

But in real-world apps, there are TONS of patterns that pop up at a low, coding level. Using higher order functions, you can make them go away. As I show in that set of blog posts, my favourite example is WCF's "try-close/finally-abort" pattern. The "try/finally-dispose" pattern is so common it got turned into a language keyword: using. Same thing for "lock". Those are both trivially represented as higher order functions, and only because C# didn't support them originally do we need hard-coded language keywords to support them. (Quick: switch your "lock" blocks out to use a ReaderWriter lock. Oops, we'll have to write a higher order function first.)

But perhaps convincing just requires looking at Microsoft. Generics aka parametric polymorphism? That's hardly OO, but a nice functional concept that, now, everyone loves. The cute Ninject framework wouldn't work without it. Lambdas? As expression trees, they're how LINQ, Fluent NHibernate, etc. get all their power. Again, that doesn't come from OO or imperative programming. The new Threading library? Pretty ugly without closures.

So, functional programming has been blessing things like .NET over the last decade. The major advances (such as generics, "LINQ") are directly from functional languages. Why not realise there's something to it and get more involved in it? That's how I'd phrase it to skeptics.

The bigger problem is actually getting people to make the jump in understanding to higher order functions. While it's quite easy, if you've never seen it before in your life, it might be shocking an incomprehensible. (Heck, seems like a lot of people think generics are just for type-safe collections, and LINQ is just embedded SQL.)

So, what you should do is go through your codebase, and find places that are an overly-complicated imperative nightmare. Search for the underlying patterns, and use functions to string it together nicely. If you can't find any, you might settle for just demo'ing off lists. For example "find all the Foos in this list and remove them". That's a 1 line thing in functional style "myList.Remove(x=>x.Bla > 0)" versus 7 lines in C# style (create a temp list, loop through and add to-remove items, loop though and remove the items).

The hope is that, even though the syntax is odd, people will recognize "wow, that's a lot simpler". If they can put down the "verbose == more readable" and "that looks confusing" for a bit, you'll have a chance.

Good luck.

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Essentially, the functional paradigm is highly effective for parallel processing:

"The really interesting thing I want you to notice, here, is that as soon as you think of map and reduce as functions that everybody can use, and they use them, you only have to get one supergenius to write the hard code to run map and reduce on a global massively parallel array of computers, and all the old code that used to work fine when you just ran a loop still works only it's a zillion times faster which means it can be used to tackle huge problems in an instant.

Lemme repeat that. By abstracting away the very concept of looping, you can implement looping any way you want, including implementing it in a way that scales nicely with extra hardware."

http://www.joelonsoftware.com/items/2006/08/01.html

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2  
If only it were that simple... –  Jon Harrop Apr 19 '11 at 21:14

The best advocacy paper ever written for the functional style is a paper by John Hughes called Why Functional Programming Matters. I suggest you do some examples for yourself until you reach the stage where you can convincingly make the arguments laid out in that paper.

Many of the examples in the paper are numerical and do not resonate with today's audiences. One more contemporary exercise I gave my students was to use the ideas in that paper to pack large media files onto 4.7GB DVDs for backup. They used Michael Mitzenmacher's "bubble search" algorithm to generate alternative packings, and using this algorithm and Hughes's techniques it was easy to get each DVD (except the last) 99.9% full. Very sweet.

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the url is not working –  compie Jan 3 '11 at 10:18
    
@compie fixed. I hate linkrot. –  Norman Ramsey Jan 21 '11 at 2:25

Another example would be the Quicksort algorithm. It can be described very briefly in a functional language like Haskell:

qsort []     = []
qsort (x:xs) = qsort (filter (< x) xs) ++ [x] ++ qsort (filter (>= x) xs)

but needs some more coding in an iterative language. On the referenced Website you can also find a lot of other examples with comparisons between languages.

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1  
On that same link you can also find that this is kind of inefficient, since you're traversing the xs list twice on each iteration. So, although it is a very popular example, I don't particularly like it. –  Kurt Schelfthout Mar 29 '09 at 15:15
1  
Also, this doesn't really make code cleaner, this piece of code seems rather "clever" (if you know what I mean), and, aren't we doing alot of copying here? not very efficient I'd say. –  hasenj Mar 29 '09 at 15:45
    
That is not quicksort. –  Jon Harrop Jan 23 '11 at 18:51
    
@Jon. Why is this not quicksort? @hasen: I think the code describes perfectly how quicksort works, why is it "clever"? also, this is not inherently inefficient, it's just written this way to make it concise. To iterate the list just once: qsort (x:xs) = qsort lesser ++ [x] ++ qsort greater, where (lesser, greater) = List.partition (<x) xs –  tokland Feb 13 '11 at 18:03
1  
@Jon: I am no expert on algorithmia, but I am surprised because I've seen this kind of implementation of quicksort in many (and serious) places. The wikipedia states: "Although quicksort is usually not implemented as an in-place sort, it is possible to create such an implementation". Can you provide any URL? [checking the sieve one, any about quicksort?] –  tokland Feb 13 '11 at 21:03

In order to achieve what you want, and to communicate it to others in your organisation you need to demonstrate your company's business being built in a better way.

Its no use using a couple of algorithms to demonstrate the power of functional programming if its totally useless for your business domain. So, take some existing code and rewrite it functionally. If you can prove through that, that it is better, people will listen to you - you've shown them a concrete, relevant example. IF you cannot, then perhaps functional programming is not the solution you've been looking for.

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If by the 'functional style' you mean the usage of concepts like 'map', 'apply', 'reduce', 'filter', lambda functions and list comprehensions, then it should be evident that code that has to deal with operations on lists is almost always more concise when written in the 'functional style'. But if you're mixing 'functional style' with imperative code in a mostly imperative language, it really is just a matter of style.

In python for example, you can reimplement the Haskell qsort crackmigg posted like so:

def qsort(list):
    if list == []:
        return []
    else:
        x = list[0]; xs = list[1:]
        return qsort(filter(lambda y: y<x, xs)) + [x] + qsort(filter(lambda y: y>= x, xs))

Although writing the last line as

return qsort([y for y in xs if y<x]) + [x] + qsort([y for y in xs if y>=x])

is arguably more 'pythonic'.

But this is obviously more concise than the implementation here:

http://hetland.org/coding/python/quicksort.html

Which, incidentally, is how I would have thought about implementing it before I learned Haskell.

The functional version is extremely clear if and only if you are acclimated to functional programming and grok what filter is going to do as easily as the well-worn C++ programmer groks a for loop without even having to think much about it. And that's clearly what the real issue at stake here: functional 'style' programming is a completely different mindset. If the people you work with aren't used to thinking recursively, and aren't the type to get excited about, not just a new technology, but a whole other way of thinking about solving their problems, then any amount of code comparisons isn't going to win them over.

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1  
What you posted is not technically an implementation of the quicksort algorithm, because it will go through the list twice to partition it. See augustss.blogspot.com/2007/08/… –  RossFabricant Mar 29 '09 at 15:09
    
You're correct. The lack of O(n) array operations is the biggest drawback to functional programming (although you can do them in Lisp with vectors!) –  Zachary Hamm Mar 29 '09 at 15:20
    
Splitting a list in two can easily be done in a single pass. I think that F# has such a function built in. Two passes would also be O(n) though. You can also have something equivalent to array operations. Check out Chris Okasaki's "Purely Functional Data Structures." –  Jørgen Fogh Jul 20 '09 at 13:24
    
That is not quicksort but not because of the double pass. –  Jon Harrop Jan 23 '11 at 18:50

A good example cood be creating your own programming language using existing one, where you will have to use Monads.

With F# it's much much simplier to write parsing logic than with C#.

Take a look at this article: Functional .NET - LINQ or Language Integrated Monads?

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Algorithms involving backtracking search and simplifying undo support in GUIs are two places I've used functional style in practice.

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A simple example of a task that is often easiest done in a functional style is the transformation of data from one form to another. "Sum of squares" is a trivial example of data transformation. Luca's talk at last year's PDC showed how to use this sort of data transformation for something more practical, downloading and analyzing stock quotes. The demo is done in F#, but the concepts are the same and can be applied to C# or most other programming languages.

http://channel9.msdn.com/pdc2008/TL11/

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Show them jQuery's way of iterating over DOM elements:

$(".magic-divs").click(function(){
    // FYI, in this context, "this" will be the element clicked on.
    alert("somebody clicked on " + this.id);
    this.hide();

});

$(".magic-divs").show();

vs. how most google results for "javascript element by classname" do it:

var arrayOfElements = // this is filled with the elements somehow
for(var i=0,j=arrayOfElements.length; i<j; i++) {
   alert("now I get to add an onclick event somehow " + i);
}
// i dont even want to type the ugly for-loop stuff to hide every div...

Functional programming is useful in everyday stuff like the above!

(note: I don't know if my example fits the exact definition of functional programming, but if it does, than functional programming is awesome)

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I came up with a little trick recently to make lambdas, passed into my extension methods look more F# ish. Here it goes:

What I wanted to do was something like:

3.Times(() => Console.WriteLine("Doin' it"));

Now the extension method for that is easily implemented:

    public static void Times(this int times, Action action)
    {
        Enumerable.Range(1, times).ToList().ForEach(index => action());
    }

What I didn't like is that I am specifying the index here: ForEach(index => action()) although it never is used, so I replaced it with a _ and got ForEach(_ => action())

That's nice, but now I was motivated to have my calling code look similar

(I never liked the "()" at the beginning of the lambda expression), so instead of: 3.Times(() => ...); I wanted 3.Times(_ => ...); The only way to implement this was to pass a fake parameter to the extension method, which never gets used and so I modified it like so:

    public static void Times(this int times, Action<byte> action)
    {
        Enumerable.Range(1, times).ToList().ForEach(_ => action(byte.MinValue));
    }

This allows me to call it like this:

3.Times(_ => Console.WriteLine("Doin' it"));

Not much of a change, but I still enjoyed, that it was possible to make that little tweak so easily and at the same time removing the "()" noise makes it much more readable.

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1  
I'd argue that this doesn't make it more readable in C#. Knowing C#, I'd look at this code and go 'WTF?'. –  Robert Jeppesen Oct 23 '10 at 21:48
  1. Show how to code a distinct of an array. Distinct is very easy in SQL but was hard on a memory array. Now it is easy to distinct an array with LINQ.

  2. You can explain them that there will be parralel LINQ (PLINQ) in the future. When you start writing functional code it will be easier to parralelize your application. Google uses MapReduce extensively.

  3. Explain to them that LINQ is a query language to manipulate al different kinds of data. In memory, in a database, excell, web services, xml files, JSON files. It is some kind of universal SQL. However people who don't like SQL will be less convinced.

I wouldn't talk to much about functional programming, I would explain how LINQ can help developers.

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It's interesting noone has really answered the question: what task is best done in a "functional style"?

A program/algorithm consists of 2 parts: logic control and data structure. I think the tasks best done in a functional style are those involved lists or arrays in cases where they behave like list (e.g. qsort). It's no coincidence that functional programming languages have very good support for lists.

When the data structures deviate from lists, I think the use of a functional programming style become a little "unnatural".

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1  
What about trees? –  Jon Harrop Jan 23 '11 at 18:51

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