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For the past few days, I have been writing a system to ease the writing of text-based adventures (similar to Colossal Cave or Zork). I've been running into an issue with the Item subsystem.

The three classes concerned are Room, Door, and Item.

When I remove an Item object from a Room's item vector, the last Door object in the same room's Door vector is corrupted. It should be noted that all Door and Item objects are passed by reference, this allows one to write their own Door and Item subclasses and still use them with the system. What's strange, is that the ONLY property of the door object to be corrupted is the "Location" attribute, which tells the player where in the room the door is. All other attributes are left untouched, this tells me that the pointer to the door object has not been moved, but the data it points to has been altered.

What this causes is an error in how the player sees door descriptions. For testing, I didn't give the doors special descriptions, there are too many of them, so they use my internal, canned description.

You are in a large parlour room.  It is obviously that of a very wealthy man.
Adorning the walls are many dusty heads of big game.
There is a door in the direction of West.
There is a door in the direction of East.
There is a door in the direction of North.
Hanging on the wall, you see a really bad ass looking sword.
Parlour] pickup sword
Picked up the Sword of the Gods
You pick up the sword.
In doing so, you feel very powerful.
There is a door in the direction of West.
There is a door in the direction of East.
There is a door in the direction of ?.
Parlour] 

The player can still move from room to room, so the rest of the data in the door object is seemingly okay. However, the std::string that stores the "Location" property has been changed. Nowhere in the code do I change that attribute.

Can anyone see why this is happening? Do I have a blatantly obvious error in my code or object handling? Because I cannot pinpoint in which file this is occurring, there is a lot of code to be posted.

You can download a zip file of all of my code here: http://www.filedropper.com/advsys

Here's my code, this certainly isn't all of it, as I have 467 lines over 9 files
This is called when you attempt to pick up the sword.

void OnPickup() {
    std::cout << "You pick up the sword." << std::endl;
    std::cout << "In doing so, you feel very powerful." << std::endl;

    int itemNum = ParentRoom->HasItem(Name);
    if (itemNum != -1) {
        // Wait, the item ISN'T in the room?  Then how the hell did we get HERE?
        // Whatever, error out.
        std::cout << "For some strange reason, you were hallucinating about the " + Name + "." << std::endl;
    } else {
        PlayerRef->Inventory.push_back(new GodSword(ParentRoom, PlayerRef));
        ParentRoom->RemoveItem(itemNum);  // Corrupts a door
        //delete ParentRoom->Items[itemNum];  // SEGFAULT
    }
}

Doors and Items are allocated like this. A new Door instance is passed the text-location, it's position within the room, and a pointer to the destination. Items are passed a reference to the room they are in, and a reference to the player.

house["parlour"].Doors.push_back(new Door("North", 'N', &house["bedroom"]));
house["parlour"].Items.push_back(new GodSword(&house["parlour"], &player));

Items are deleted from the room like this. The door listings are printed for debugging.

void Room::RemoveItem(int item) {
    Items.erase(Items.begin() + item);

     for (int i = 0; i < Doors.size(); i++) {
         std::cout << Doors[i]->GetDescription() << std::endl;
     }
}

The Room declaration is below.

class Room {
    public:
        std::vector<Door *> Doors;
        std::vector<Item *> Items;

        std::string LongDescription;
        std::string ShortDescription;
        std::string Name;

        bool DescribeDoors;
        bool DescribeItems;
        bool BeenHere;

        Room();
        ~Room();

        int HasDoor(char dir);
        int HasItem(std::string name);
        void OutputDescription(bool forceLong=false);
        void RemoveItem(int item);
};

I can't think of anything else I need to add. If you need to see another file, or how a different class is declared, etc... There is a link to a zip above.

share|improve this question
    
I recently had a similar problem with std::map resulting in a segfault. The problem was caused by calling erase() and gmtime_r() within a std::map<>::iterator loop, seemingly corrupting the map, even though gmtime_r() was not pointed at anything in the map. Removing erase() or gmtime_r() prevented any problems. Since I had a short deadline, I did not post it here, and resolved (deferred?) the issue by setting a flag in the entry instead of calling erase(). I added another iterator loop after the first one which looks for the flagged entries and calls erase(). –  wallyk Aug 4 '11 at 19:33
1  
This may be unrelated but I am a little lost here; the Room::HasItem is essentially an IndexOf operation but your condition for existence in the example code says if(itemNum != -1) then it isn't found. Maybe my eyes are just blurred over but is this correct, it would appear that you would only ever hit your RemoveItem block if the item isn't found, in that case you would be calling Items.erase(Items.begin() + (-1)); –  Quintin Robinson Aug 4 '11 at 19:43
2  
What is the reason for using pointers and manually allocating on the heap? Let the container manage your memory and you may want to use a std::list for more efficient insertion and removal. P.S. I believe Quintin nailed your bug. –  AJG85 Aug 4 '11 at 19:44

2 Answers 2

In this code that you posted:

   int itemNum = ParentRoom->HasItem(Name);
    if (itemNum != -1) {
        // Wait, the item ISN'T in the room?  Then how the hell did we get HERE?
        // Whatever, error out.
        std::cout << "For some strange reason, you were hallucinating about the " + Name + "." << std::endl;
    } else {
        PlayerRef->Inventory.push_back(new GodSword(ParentRoom, PlayerRef));
        ParentRoom->RemoveItem(itemNum);  // Corrupts a door
        //delete ParentRoom->Items[itemNum];  // SEGFAULT
    }

itemNum will be -1 when you attempt to remove it, which will probably lead to the segfault/memory corruption you noticed. Is the sense of the test inverted from what it should be?

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Oh, you were faster :) Also, as a side note, the code in the ZIP file does not compile - there are include files missing in each of the cpp file (mainly <string> and <iostream> headers). If you want a portable code, please add them. –  Karel Petranek Aug 4 '11 at 19:47
    
Thank you, that did it. I will add the required headers, as well. –  user381350 Aug 4 '11 at 19:56

Dewtell spotted the bug causing the memory corruption. However, the true error in the code lies at this line:

int itemNum = ParentRoom->HasItem(Name);

as it should be:

int itemNum = ParentRoom->HasItem(PickupName);

Otherwise the match can never be found.

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