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I have a Foo entity in Entity Framework. But I'm making it inherit from IFoo so that my business logic only knows IFoo - thus abstracting Entity Framework away.

The problem is that Foo has a collection of Bar entities. And this collection is of type EntityCollection<Bar> .

If I put this collection in IFoo as it is, I make IFoo dependent on Entity Framework. So I thought of putting it as ICollection<IBar>, but this doesn't compile (naturally).

The only solution I can think of is to go to the concrete Foo implementation generated by the Entity Framework designer and change the collection from EntityCollection<Bar> to ICollection<IBar> there. But I dread the thought of the implications this will have on Entity Framework "behind the scenes".

Is there any way for me to define IFoo and IBar independently of Entity Framework while still maintaining Foo and Bar as EF Entities that implement them? Do IFoo and IBar even make sense, if I cannot achieve this independence that I aim for?

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What is the exact reason you want IFoos and IBars instead of Foos and Bars? –  Inferis Mar 29 '09 at 22:17
    
I am aiming for persistence ignorance. See the accepted answer below. –  urig Mar 30 '09 at 5:30
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5 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The general concept you are referring to is "persistence ignorance" (PI), although that generally applies directly to entities themselves rather than the code that consumes the entities.

In any case, Hibernate and NHibernate natively support PI, but the initial version of Microsoft's Entity Framework does not. MS caught a lot of flak for this and PI is probably the #1 most discussed feature for the next version (whenever that is).

As far as what you are trying to do with interfaces, does the collection of Bars need to be modified after it is retrieved? If the answer is yes, there is no easy answer. Even covariance couldn't help you here because ICollection<T> has an Add method.

If the collection is read-only, then you might consider exposing it as IEnumerable<IBar>. The Enumerable.Cast method makes this fairly convenient.

interface IFoo
{
    IEnumerable<IBar> Bars { get; }
}

partial class Foo : IFoo
{
    IEnumerable<IBar> IFoo.Bars
    {
        get { return Bars.Cast<IBar>(); }
    }
}

Also, I know of at least one effort to make the current version of EF support persistence ignorance.

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Why can't modifications be made? AttachTo could attach the object to the context, where after modifications can be made. –  aleemb May 2 '09 at 10:18
    
Does EF 4 do this? –  BigJoe714 Jan 20 '11 at 16:20
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I'm a Java developer, so I can't comment with any authority on Entity Framework. I can tell you that ORM solutions like Hibernate make it possible to have POJO persistence without having to resort to common abstract classes, interfaces, or modifying byte code. It handles relationships like the 1:m you cite for your Foo and Bar without having to use special collection classes.

The special sauce is externalized into mapping configuration and Hibernate itself.

The little bit that I read about Entity Framework suggests that it's an ORM solution with the same aim: POCO persistence. I didn't see any mention of interfaces. I can't see the need for them from your example, because it's too abstract.

I'm inferring that it's possible to get that independence between business objects and persistence tier without having to resort to those interfaces, because I know Hibernate does it. I'd say that Spring's JDBC solution accomplishes it as well, because there's no need for common interfaces. They use a RowMapper construct to ferry data out of a query and into an object.

I wish I could advise you precisely how to do it with Entity Framework, but maybe you'll take heart knowing that it can be done.

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Thanks for the detailed response. I've a positive experience in the past with NHibernate, the .net version of Java's Hibernate. I'm no expert on EF but I understand that its mapping is attribute based rather than externalized in an XML file. That's why I need to abstract via an interface.I think ;) –  urig Mar 29 '09 at 15:47
    
Perhaps you're right. I just didn't see any evidence of that in a brief run through of a Google article. Sorry I'm not more helpful. –  duffymo Mar 29 '09 at 17:11
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I recently wrote a comprehensive post about this: Persistence Ignorance in ADO.NET Entity Framework. You might want to look at EFPocoAdapter. That does just this and it will eventually deprecate into EF v2.

For what it's worth, I am using EFPocoAdapater and it's been working well for me.

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We've been doing the exact same thing for LINQ to SQL. I got around the collection issue by writing a class which wraps an IList and casts to and from the correct type as required. It looks a bit like this:

public class ListWrapper<TSource, TTarget> : IList<TTarget>
    where TTarget : class
    where TSource : class, TTarget
{
    private IList<TSource> internalList;

    public ListWrapper(IList<TSource> internalList)
    {
        this.internalList = internalList;
    }

    public void Add(TTarget item)
    {
        internalList.Add((TSource)item);
    }

    public IEnumerator<TTarget> GetEnumerator()
    {
        return new EnumeratorWrapper<TSource, TTarget>(internalList.GetEnumerator());
    }

    // and all the other IList members
}

EnumeratorWrapper similarly wraps an IEnumerator and performs the casting. In the LINQ to SQL partial classes we expose the property like this:

public IList<ICustomer> Foos
{
    get
    {
        return new ListWrapper<Foo, IFoo>(this.Foos_internal);
    }
}

Any changes to the exposed list will be performed on the internal EntitySet so they stay in sync.

This works well enough but my feeling is that this whole approach is more trouble than it's worth, I'm a huge NHibernate fan and a strong believer in P.I. but we've put in a LOT of extra effort doing this and haven't really seen any advantage. We use the repository pattern to abstract away the actual DataContext access which I would say is the key part of decoupling ourselves from LINQ to SQL.

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Use a partial class to seperate your logic and rules from the autogenerated EF objects. In the example below FooEntityObject class is split into two using the partial keyword. I've used this technique before with EF and LINQ to SQL. The partial classes can be stored in seperate files so if your regenerate your EF object again your custom code doesn't get overwriten.

interface IFoo
{
    public ICollection<IBar> GetBars();
}

public partial class FooEntityObject : IFoo
{
    public ICollection<IBar> GetBars()
    {
        // convert EntityCollection<Bar> into ICollection<IBar> here
    }
}


public partial class FooEntityObject
{
    EntityCollection<Bar> Bars{get;set;}
}
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