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With this code, I get a segmentation fault:

   char* inputStr = "abcde";
   *(inputStr+1)='f';

If the code was:

   const char* inputStr = "abcde";
   *(inputStr+1)='f';

I will get compile error for "assigning read-only location". However, for the first case, there is no compile error; just the segmentation fault when the assign operation actually happened.

Can anyone explain this?

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New smart compilers, like gcc, will warn you about this. –  user405725 Aug 4 '11 at 22:17
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8 Answers 8

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here is what the standard says about string literals in section [2.13.4/2]:

A string literal that does not begin with u, U, or L is an ordinary string literal, also referred to as a narrow string literal. An ordinary string literal has type “array of n const char”, where n is the size of the string as defined below; it has static storage duration (3.7) and is initialized with the given characters.

So, strictly speaking, "abcde" has type

const char[6]

Now what happens in your code is an implicit cast to

char*

so that the assignment is allowed. The reason why it is so is, likely, compatibility with C. Have a look also at the discussion here: http://learningcppisfun.blogspot.com/2009/07/string-literals-in-c.html

Once the cast is done, you are syntactically free to modify the literal, but it fails because the compiler stores the literal in a non writable segment of memory, as the standard itself allow.

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This gets created in the code segment:

char *a = "abcde";

Essentially it's const.

If you wish to edit it, try:

char a[] = "abcde";
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The standard states that you are not allowed to modify string literals directly, regardless of whether you mark them const or not:

Whether all string literals are distinct (that is, are stored in nonoverlapping objects) is implementation-defined. The effect of attempting to modify a string literal is undefined.

In fact, in C (unlike C++), string literals are not const but you're still not allowed to write to them.

This restriction on writing allows certain optimisations to take place, such as sharing of literals along the lines of:

char *ermsg = "invalid option";
char *okmsg =   "valid option";

where okmsg can actually point to the 'v' character in ermsg, rather than being a distinct string.

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String literals are typically stored in read-only memory. Trying to change this memory will kill your program.

Here's a good explanation: Is a string literal in c++ created in static memory?

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It is mostly ancient history; once upon a long time ago, string literals were not constant.

However, most modern compilers place string literals into read-only memory (typically, the text segment of your program, where your code also lives), and any attempt to change a string literal will yield a core dump or equivalent.

With G++, you can most certainly get the compilation warning (-Wall if it is not enabled by default). For example, G++ 4.6.0 compiled on MacOS X 10.6.7 (but running on 10.7) yields:

$ cat xx.cpp
int main()
{
    char* inputStr = "abcde";
   *(inputStr+1)='f';
}
$ g++ -c xx.cpp
xx.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
xx.cpp:3:22: warning: deprecated conversion from string constant to ‘char*’ [-Wwrite-strings]
$

So the warning is enabled by default.

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What happened is that the compiler put the constant "abcde" in some read-only memory segment. You pointed your (non-const) char* inputStr at that constant, and kaboom, segfault.

Lesson to be learned: Don't invoke undefined behavior.

Edit (elaboration)

However, for the first case, there is no compile error, just segmentation fault when the assign operation actually happened.

You need to enabled your compiler warnings. Always set your compiler warnings as high as possible.

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Even though "abcde" is a string literal, which should not be modified, you've told the compiler that you don't care about that by having a non-const char* point to it.

The compiler will happily assume that you know what you're doing, and not throw an error. However, there's a good chance that the code will fail at runtime when you do indeed try to modify the string literal.

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String literals, while officially non-const, are almost always stored in read-only memory. In your setup, this is apparently only the case if it is declared as const char array.

Note that the standard forbids you to modify any string literal.

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