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does anybody know of any cmd tools that can plot a histogram in the terminal in ASCII or text format?

Ideally the program would work like this:

%>histogram -from 0.0 -to 100.0 -bins 5 file.data

   0- 20 *****                 16 xx%
  20- 40 ****************      44 xx%
  40- 60 ********************  61 xx%
  60- 80 *********             22 xx%
  80-100 ****                  14 xx%
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closed as off-topic by kleopatra, LittleBobbyTables, Marijn, watcher, Mathias Müller Mar 18 at 15:06

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6 Answers 6

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Bitly developed and released a Python package called data_hacks that provides some ASCII visualization tools.

A utility that parses input data points and outputs a text histogram:

$ cat /tmp/data | histogram.py
# NumSamples = 29; Max = 10.00; Min = 1.00
# Mean = 4.379310; Variance = 5.131986; SD = 2.265389
# each * represents a count of 1
    1.0000 -     1.9000 [     1]: *
    1.9000 -     2.8000 [     5]: *****
    2.8000 -     3.7000 [     8]: ********
    3.7000 -     4.6000 [     3]: ***
    4.6000 -     5.5000 [     4]: ****
    5.5000 -     6.4000 [     2]: **
    6.4000 -     7.3000 [     3]: ***
    7.3000 -     8.2000 [     1]: *
    8.2000 -     9.1000 [     1]: *
    9.1000 -    10.0000 [     1]: *

Generate an ascii bar chart for input data (this is like a visualization of uniq -c):

$ cat data | bar_chart.py --sort-keys
# each * represents a count of 2
19:0 [     1] 
19:1 [    24] ************
19:2 [     3] *
19:3 [     9] ****
19:4 [     5] **
19:5 [    41] ********************
20:0 [   115] *********************************************************
20:1 [   181] ******************************************************************************************
20:2 [   136] ********************************************************************
20:3 [   155] *****************************************************************************
20:4 [   150] ***************************************************************************
20:5 [    79] ***************************************
21:0 [    64] ********************************
21:1 [     8] ****
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I was dissatisfied with the AWK script answer below. It's really cool (actually REALLY cool), but it's limited on its inputs. So I wrote my own in Perl that has some better characteristics. Here's the project page: https://github.com/philovivero/distribution

Notably: you can just pass in any arbitrary strings, and it'll tally up everything for you (doing the "| sort | uniq -c" bit) and then output. You can take the output of my script and sort it if you want the histogram by values rather than by frequency of values. So check it out:

cat /usr/share/dict/words | awk '{print length($1)}' | distribution --char=# | sort -n
Value Count Percentile
1  52  0.05%     #
2  182  0.18%    #
3  845  0.85%    ####
4  3346  3.37%   ##############
5  6788  6.84%   ###########################
6  11278  11.37% ############################################
7  14787  14.91% ##########################################################
8  15674  15.81% ##############################################################
9  14262  14.38% ########################################################
10 11546  11.64% #############################################
11 8415  8.49%   #################################
12 5508  5.55%   ######################
13 3236  3.26%   #############
14 1679  1.69%   #######
15 893  0.90%    ####
16 382  0.39%    ##
17 176  0.18%    #
18 72  0.07%     #
19 31  0.03%     #
20 10  0.01%     #
21 3  0.00%      #
22 5  0.01%      #
23 1  0.00%      #

Yeah, that's just like the awk script answer, but look at this:

$ cat /var/log/syslog.1 | awk '{print $5}' | distribution --height=10 --char=#
Value                 Count Percentile
kernel:               2012  49.94% ############################################
NetworkManager[1197]: 949  23.55%  #####################
ovpn-client[11447]:   337  8.36%   ########
wpa_supplicant[3695]: 191  4.74%   #####
avahi-daemon[1172]:   160  3.97%   ####
dhclient:             143  3.55%   ####
dbus[1111]:           44  1.09%    #
last                  12  0.30%    #
rtkit-daemon[2656]:   7  0.17%     #
dnsmasq[27313]:       6  0.15%     #

And regexp tokenizing/matching of the input:

zcat /var/log/syslog*gz \
    | awk '{print $5" "$6}' \
    | distribution --tokenize=word --match=word --height=10 --char=o
Val           |Ct (Pct)       Histogram
kernel        |12112 (32.99%) ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo
NetworkManager|5695 (15.51%)  ooooooooooooooooooooooo
info          |5371 (14.63%)  oooooooooooooooooooooo
client        |1633 (4.45%)   ooooooo
ovpn          |1633 (4.45%)   ooooooo
daemon        |868 (2.36%)    oooo
avahi         |853 (2.32%)    oooo
dhclient      |736 (2.00%)    ooo
Trying        |667 (1.82%)    ooo
dnsmasq       |562 (1.53%)    ooo

I wrote this because I was doing some log analysis on large Hadoop logfiles. I've searched for this sort of tool dozens of times in the past. I'm glad I finally just wrote it myself, because it was only a few hours' work, and is paying off immensely already. Notes:

  1. If something else already tallied up the numbers for you, you pass "--graph" to my script. eg: "du -sb /etc/* | distribution --graph".
  2. If you pass the "--verbose" option while parsing an extremely large file, it'll give you progress and at the end some statistics about run-time.
  3. If you pass the "--color" option it'll colourise your output. I like bling.
  4. You must have Time::HiRes, which is fine on some distributions (Ubuntu 12.04), but CentOS (for example) doesn't include this (?!). On my to-do is to dynamically note if that module is available and only use it if so. For now, you have to know how to comment out the time-related lines in the script
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You might find this script useful - I think I've been on this question before, looking for the same thing. I wrote it myself in the end. It's not bug free, but does work on lists of numbers (although it expects them on a new line).

You can do things like this:

mark$ cat /usr/share/dict/words \
| awk '{print length($1)}' \
| distribution -v max_width=30
   Value   Height     %ile Histogram
       0        0   0.0000 
       1       52   0.0220 #
       2      160   0.0899 #
       3     1420   0.6919 ##
       4     5272   2.9268 #####
       5    10230   7.2637 ##########
       6    17706  14.7698 #################
       7    23869  24.8887 #######################
       8    29989  37.6021 ############################
       9    32403  51.3388 ##############################
      10    30878  64.4290 #############################
      11    26013  75.4568 #########################
      12    20462  84.1313 ###################
      13    14939  90.4645 ##############
      14     9765  94.6042 ##########
      15     5925  97.1160 ######
      16     3377  98.5476 ####
      17     1813  99.3162 ##
      18      842  99.6731 #
      19      428  99.8546 #
      20      198  99.9385 #
      21       82  99.9733 #
      22       41  99.9907 #
      23       17  99.9979 #
      24        5 100.0000 #

Hope you find it useful!

share|improve this answer
    
awesome, thanks for your help. this is exactly what i've been looking for. –  dimka Jul 16 '12 at 20:37
    
this is wonderful, thank you! –  Anne Aug 28 '12 at 14:11

gnuplot has dumb terminal for that. All the power of gnuplot is available in terminals too. Like that.

share|improve this answer
    
that works, but the data cannot be parsed. i know a python script can be written, just trying to see if anybody already has something like that. –  dimka Aug 5 '11 at 16:18
    
what data? gnuplot plots data from external files okay. like << plot "file.dat" >>. –  horsh Aug 5 '11 at 17:01
    
sorry about that, should have made it more clear. the data file will contain just numbers. –  dimka Aug 5 '11 at 19:33
1  
@horsh, link is dead. How about a working example of a binned histogram with minimum gnuplot version requirements? –  A-B-B Apr 3 at 19:01

If you are on unix, you can do this with shell command

history | awk '{h[$2]++}END{for(i in h){print h[i],i|"sort -rn|head -20"}}' |awk '!max{max=$1;}{r="";i=s=60*$1/max;while(i-->0)r=r"#";printf "%15s %5d %s %s",$2,$1,r,"\n";}'



  emacs  3162 ########################################
     ll  1585 #####################
    svn  1567 ####################
    awk  1527 ####################
     cd   905 ############
     rm   800 ###########
    cat   718 ##########
 screen   479 #######
   last   341 #####
    sudo  326 #####
   grep   323 #####
     mv   318 #####
   less   288 ####
   wget   242 ####
     sh   223 ###
    dot   202 ###
 h|grep   181 ###
  whois   171 ###
 python   163 ###
   host   151 ##
    for   145 ##

I believe these unix shell commands are available for windows too. ( http://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/unix-command-line-utilities-for-windows/ )

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, it doesn't work for numbers though –  dimka Aug 5 '11 at 16:17
    
also the command you gave doesn't work. did you paste it correctly? the brackets are not balanced on the last 'awk' command. –  dimka Aug 5 '11 at 16:23
    
Sorry I didn't make it clear and the script will not work right off for your purpose. You need to change the script for your purpose because, for example, I don't know how your data file looks like. I just showed you how it can be done. –  Tae-Sung Shin Aug 5 '11 at 16:44
bar_chart=$(awk '{print $4}' $File | uniq -c | 
awk '{printf $2 " " $1 " "
{ for(i=1; i<=$1; ++i)
  {printf ("#")}
}
{print ""} }' | column -t)

printf "%-10s [%4s] %-0s\n" $bar_chart

=============================
2011:21:51 [   3] ###
2011:21:53 [   1] #
2011:21:56 [   1] #
2011:21:57 [   1] #
2011:21:58 [   1] #
2011:22:01 [   1] #
2011:22:03 [   2] ##
2011:22:05 [   2] ##
2011:22:06 [   4] ####
2011:22:09 [   1] #
2011:22:12 [   3] ###
2011:22:15 [   2] ##
2011:22:16 [   4] ####
2011:22:17 [   3] ###
2011:22:18 [   3] ###
2011:22:19 [  12] ############
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