Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I've a code:

class Parent{
    int x=10;
    void show(){
        System.out.println(x);
    }
}

class Child extends Parent{
    int x=20;
    public static void main(String[] args){
        Child c=new Child();
        c.show();
    }
}

Here when I run this program the output comes is 10. Which means at runtime Parent member-function not using the Child data-member with same name(data hiding). The thing I know is that whenever we are extending a class its parent class member-function and data-members are available to Child class, then when I say c.show() why it takes the data-member of Parent class not Child class. Also, I want to know that when we create an object of Child class its Parent class data-members are put in the Parent section of Child class object in Heap, but what happens to member-functions?

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

The child can't hide a field from a method in the parent class by simply declaring its own version of the field. You are applying the idea of "data hiding" in reverse. The child can never hide fields from the parent, but the parent can hide fields from the child (by declaring x as private). If you wanted to, you could use encapsulation to achieve your desired effect, like:

class Parent{
    private int x=10;

    public int getX() {
        return x;
    }

    void show(){
        System.out.println(this.getX());
    }
}

class Child extends Parent{
    int x=20;

    @Override
    public int getX() {
        return x;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args){
        Child c=new Child();
        c.show();
    }
}

By overriding the getX() accessor method, the child can hide the parent's value of x from the rest of the world.

Some other points worth discussing:

The thing I know is that whenever we are extending a class its parent class member-function and data-members are available to Child class

This is not entirely correct. Private methods and data members will not be (directly) available to the child class. Only public, protected, and "package-level" methods and fields will be directly accessible to the child class.

Also, I want to know that when we create an object of Child class its Parent class data-members are put in the Parent section of Child class object in Heap, but what happens to member-functions?

Member functions aren't created per-instance. It would be terribly inefficient if the JVM worked like that. Instead, the method implementations for a given class are defined only once, as part of the Permanent Generation which holds things like class definitions and other internal JVM state. All instances of a given class will share the same method definitions.

In the case of a child class, it will share the method definitions of its parent, and it will also have its own definitions added for any methods that exist just in the child (and for any methods that it overrides).

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Interesting points. – Mahesh Aug 5 '11 at 4:24

The thing I know is that whenever we are extending a class its parent class member-function and data-members are available to Child class, then when I say c.show() why it takes the data-member of Parent class not Child class.

Your understanding correct. But the otherwise is not true. Parent class sub-object doesn't have access to child class sub-object. Since show() is in the scope of base class Parent, it is accessing it's own members. Try to comment the member x in the parent class and see if your program compiles.

Commented x in parent class and see the output yourself

share|improve this answer
    
when i'm commenting member 'x' in parent it does not compile and shows error at 'System.out.println(x)'. Okay, i can understand that but its not clear to me how scope of function is related to that? – Mohammad Faisal Aug 5 '11 at 4:05
1  
A parent class member function can access only it's members. When you make a call to c.show();, currently you are in the scope of Parent class. Had if the member function is overridden in the Child class, then the scope would be in the Child class. When you are trying to access an instance variable/method, it should be in the scope of the location in which it is used. – Mahesh Aug 5 '11 at 4:07
    
Okay, but my second question is still unanswered. It is, when we create object of Child class then in the Heap a Child class object is created having data-members of Child class and inside the Child class object there is another section where Parent class data-members also. Then how the show() corresponds to the data-member of Parent? – Mohammad Faisal Aug 5 '11 at 4:15
    
Check @aroth answer. It has good points. – Mahesh Aug 5 '11 at 4:23

X in child is only shadowing over the base class, not overriding it. The base class member variable is not altered, only hidden by a separate variable in the child class that happens to have the same name. They.are still completely different variables.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.