Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is a very strange issue. I'm trying to print a large text file, it's a Wikipedia entry. It happens to be the page on Velocity. So, when I tell it to print the file, it prints "In", when it should print "In physics, velocity is etc, etc etc". Here's the code I'm using to print out:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>

using namespace std;

    int main()
        {
        ifstream wiki;
        wiki.open("./wiki/velocity.txt");
        char* wikiRead;
        wiki >> wikiRead;
        cout << wikiRead << endl;
        wiki.close();
        }

Please help.

share|improve this question
    
Why would you think an entire line would be read? The code above only asks for a single word to be printed. You may want to look into the getline function. –  Huw Aug 5 '11 at 5:03
    
Thanks for humoring me, you guys. –  Fredo Nov 18 '11 at 19:29

6 Answers 6

wiki >> wikiRead;

The default delimiter for stream is space, so when the stream encounters a space, it simply stops reading, that is why it reads only one word.

If you want the stream to read all words, the you've to use a loop as:

char* wikiRead = new char[1024]; //must allocate some memory!
while(wiki >> wikiRead)
{
   cout << wikiRead << endl;
}
wiki.close();
delete []wikiRead; //must deallocate the memory

This will print all the words in the file, each on a new line. Note if any of the word in the file is more than 1024 character long, then this program would invoke undefined behavior, and the program might crash. In that case, you've to allocate a bigger chunk of memory.

But why use char* in the first place? In C++, you've better choice: Use std::string.

#include<string>

std::string word;
while(wiki >> word)
{
   cout << word << endl;
}
wiki.close();

Its better now.

If you want to read line-by-line, instead of word-by-word, then use std::getline as:

std::string line;
while(std::getline(wiki, line))
{
   cout << line << endl;
}
wiki.close();

This will read a complete line, even if the line contains spaces between the words, and will print each line a newline.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1, Because this is the only correct answer. –  Alok Save Aug 5 '11 at 5:14

You ask the stream to read the (binary) value of a pointer (probably 4 bytes, depending on your machine architecture), then you ask it to print the text pointed to by those 4 bytes!

share|improve this answer
    
Not really, the code asks for reading the first word in the file, because default delimter for stream is space. –  Alok Save Aug 5 '11 at 5:13
    
That'll teach me to answer questions in the middle of the night when I've got insomnia. You are still reading to an uninitialised pointer, though, so anything can happen. –  Nikki Locke Aug 5 '11 at 5:51
    
Thank you all. You were extremely helpful. –  Fredo Aug 8 '11 at 16:57

I wonder why you ignored the compiler warning (most of the modern compiler warns you about using uninitialized variables). How about this?

    ifstream wiki;
    wiki.open("./wiki/velocity.txt");
    char wikiRead[255];
    wiki >> wikiRead;
    cout << wikiRead << endl;
    wiki.close();

Alternatively I'd suggest you to use string object with getline to get a single line of text.

string str;
getline(wiki, str);
share|improve this answer
    
Your first example is NOT reading the entire file. –  Alok Save Aug 5 '11 at 5:11
    
The original code has given is also not reading the entire file? It's all up to him whether he should read entire file or not! –  sarat Aug 5 '11 at 5:22
    
The Q is clear, OP wants to read the entire file, His code is not able to do so. You provided him a example of your own which does the same(Does not read the entire file). So I don't really know what you are trying to say. –  Alok Save Aug 5 '11 at 5:26

The >> operator applied to a char * reads only one word. Moreover, you're reading into an uninitialized pointer, which is not valid. Usually std::string, not char *, is used for string processing in C++.

If you only want to print the file's contents, you can hook the file's buffer directly to std::cout:

int main() {
    std::ifstream wiki("./wiki/velocity.txt");
    std::cout << wiki.rdbuf() << '\n';
}

If you want to put the contents into an automatically-allocated string, use std::getline with the delimiter disabled.

int main() {
    std::ifstream wiki("./wiki/velocity.txt");
    std::string wiki_contents;
    getline( wiki, wiki_contents, '\0' /* do not stop at newline */ );

    std::cout << wiki_contents << '\n'; // do something with the string
}
share|improve this answer

Since you want to read a large file, reading it block by block is a better way.

ifstream wiki;
wiki.open("./wiki/velocity.txt");
const int buf_size = 1024;
char* wikiRead = 0;
int cnt = 1;
do
{
   wikiRead = realloc( wikiRead, bufsize*cnt );
   wiki.Read( wikiRead + (bufSize*(cnt-1)), buf_size ); //appends to reallocated memory
   cnt++;
}while( !wiki.eof())
wikiRead[(bufSize*(cnt-2)) + wiki.gcount() + 1] = '\0'; // null termination.
wiki.Close();
cout << wikiRead;
delete[] wikiRead;
share|improve this answer
    
This is a very "C" way of going about things. See the less error-prone solutions, such as the one shown by @Nawaz. Also, you shouldn't mix malloc/realloc/free with new/delete! codeproject.com/KB/tips/newandmalloc.aspx –  HostileFork Dec 1 '11 at 14:49

The operator>> is designed to only read one word at a time. If you want to read lines, use getline.

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include<string>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    ifstream wiki;
    wiki.open("./wiki/velocity.txt");

    string   wikiRead;

    while (getline(wiki, wikiRead))
    {
        cout << wikiRead << endl;
    }

    wiki.close();
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.