Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Suppose, if I have a namespace in one header file. I don't want that people should be able to expand it to other files. Is it possible in C++ ?

//N.h
namespace N {
 //...
}

//Other.h
#include"N.h"

namespace N {    // <--- don't allow this
  void foo () {}  
}

[Note: Asking this for knowledge and curiosity. Because, have heard many times that one should not expand std.]

share|improve this question
3  
Is there a practical example where this would actually be useful? Why do you care if others add things to your namespace? –  Mat Aug 5 '11 at 6:00
    
It's not possible to prohibit this. Where are you running into this issue? –  Cory Nelson Aug 5 '11 at 6:02

4 Answers 4

AFAIK, you can't do this in C++, and I don't see any practical reason for it either.

You can wrap your code into a class instead of a namespace; since a class declaration cannot be spread over several headers, others cannot add to it.

But again, I don't see why you think this is a problem, and I'd be curious to see an example.

share|improve this answer

You can only ask people to behave, not force them. Perhaps you can try this:

namespace milind
{
    namespace Private
    {
        // Please don't add stuff to my private namespace

        ... Important implementation details goes here
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You could use a class with all statics instead of a namespace to simulate the behavior.

share|improve this answer
1  
Please don't do this. –  Alexandre C. Aug 5 '11 at 7:24

Found one way. I can encapsulate the namespace inside another dummy type of namespace and then use it. To avoid verbosity, we can use an alias to the existing namespace.

i.e.

//N.h
namespace DUMMY_ {  // <--- put a dummy outer namespace
namespace N {
 //...
}
}
namespace N = DUMMY_::N; // alias the name to the original name

//Other.h
#include"N.h"

namespace N {    // <--- error !!
  void foo () {}  
}

Edit: With above solution it's less likely that people would expand namespace N. However, as @Charles comment, still DUMMY_ is visible to the reader. Which means one can still do like:

namespace DUMMY_ {
  namespace N {  // ok
    void foo () {}
  }
}

So only way remains to prohibit the undesired expansion is by replacing:

namespace N = DUMMY_::N;

with,

#define N DUMMY_::N

This will work as per expected; but we enter the region of macros.

share|improve this answer
    
What's stopping people doing the usual and correct syntax of namespace DUMMY_ { namespace N { /* more stuff */ } } ? DUMMY_ must be visible and known to clients. I don't see how this addresses the issue posed in the question. –  Charles Bailey Aug 5 '11 at 7:41
    
@Charles, that's a good point. Ok, I have edited my answer. –  iammilind Aug 5 '11 at 7:46
    
#undef N newline namespace DUMMY_ { namespace N { /* more stuff */ } } newline #define N DUMMY_::N . –  Charles Bailey Aug 5 '11 at 7:56

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.