Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have some HTML that I'm converting to a Spanned using Html.fromHtml(...), and I have a custom tag that I'm using in it:

<customtag id="1234">

So I've implemented a TagHandler to handle this custom tag, like so:

public void handleTag( boolean opening, String tag, Editable output, XMLReader xmlReader ) {

    if ( tag.equalsIgnoreCase( "customtag" ) ) {

        String id = xmlReader.getProperty( "id" ).toString();
    }
}

In this case I get a SAX exception, as I believe the "id" field is actually an attribute, not a property. However, there isn't a getAttribute() method for XMLReader. So my question is, how do I get the value of the "id" field using this XMLReader? Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Where is TagHandler? The usual way to do SAX2 is to use ContentHandlers, no? –  Ray Toal Aug 5 '11 at 6:36
1  
TagHandler is used when converting HTML text to Spannable text via Html.fromHtml(String, ImageGetter, TagHandler). It's for handling unknown tags (tags not recognized by TagSoup). –  Jason Robinson Aug 5 '11 at 16:13
    
I see. I just tagged the question with TagSoup so those familiar with this parser can find the question. I do know that in the regular SAX2 parser in the standard Java libraries you just setup ContentHandlers, not TagHandlers, and the startElement callback has the attributes already present. –  Ray Toal Aug 5 '11 at 23:43
4  
I had the same problem and when I looked at the Android source code, I saw that the attributes are intentionally not passed. So I replace tags with attributes with other tags which have a specific name. Like <customtag1234> in your case. –  vorrtex Sep 6 '11 at 13:33
    
@rekire No, I didn't. I ended up doing what vorrtex suggested. –  Jason Robinson Mar 1 '13 at 19:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here is my code to get the private attributes of the xmlReader by reflection:

Field elementField = xmlReader.getClass().getDeclaredField("theNewElement");
elementField.setAccessible(true);
Object element = elementField.get(xmlReader);
Field attsField = element.getClass().getDeclaredField("theAtts");
attsField.setAccessible(true);
Object atts = attsField.get(element);
Field dataField = atts.getClass().getDeclaredField("data");
dataField.setAccessible(true);
String[] data = (String[])dataField.get(atts);
Field lengthField = atts.getClass().getDeclaredField("length");
lengthField.setAccessible(true);
int len = (Integer)lengthField.get(atts);

String myAttributeA = null;
String myAttributeB = null;

for(int i = 0; i < len; i++) {
    if("attrA".equals(data[i * 5 + 1])) {
        myAttributeA = data[i * 5 + 4];
    } else if("attrB".equals(data[i * 5 + 1])) {
        myAttributeB = data[i * 5 + 4];
    }
}

Note you could put the values into a map but for my usage that's too much overhead.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmmm, this keeps throwing java.lang.NoSuchFieldException - what am I doing wrong? –  slott Jul 2 '14 at 11:52
1  
@slott there are three possibilities: The field does not exists anymore (might be an incompatible version); in general you are accessing a private field and you forgot to call setAccessible(true) or it is part of a base class in the last case you need to inspect its superclass. –  rekire Jul 2 '14 at 11:54
    
I got it working - trick was not to call as the first thing inside the handleTag method :) Thanx for help though - always helps when someone pushes you through the rough patches of life... –  slott Jul 2 '14 at 12:37

Based on the answer by rekire I made this slightly more robust solution that will handle any tag.

private TagHandler tagHandler = new TagHandler() {
    final HashMap<String, String> attributes = new HashMap<String, String>();

    private void processAttributes(final XMLReader xmlReader) {
        try {
            Field elementField = xmlReader.getClass().getDeclaredField("theNewElement");
            elementField.setAccessible(true);
            Object element = elementField.get(xmlReader);
            Field attsField = element.getClass().getDeclaredField("theAtts");
            attsField.setAccessible(true);
            Object atts = attsField.get(element);
            Field dataField = atts.getClass().getDeclaredField("data");
            dataField.setAccessible(true);
            String[] data = (String[])dataField.get(atts);
            Field lengthField = atts.getClass().getDeclaredField("length");
            lengthField.setAccessible(true);
            int len = (Integer)lengthField.get(atts);

            /**
             * MSH: Look for supported attributes and add to hash map.
             * This is as tight as things can get :)
             * The data index is "just" where the keys and values are stored. 
             */
            for(int i = 0; i < len; i++)
                attributes.put(data[i * 5 + 1], data[i * 5 + 4]);
        }
        catch (Exception e) {
            Log.d(TAG, "Exception: " + e);
        }
    }
...

And inside handleTag do:

    @Override
    public void handleTag(boolean opening, String tag, Editable output, XMLReader xmlReader) {

        processAttributes(xmlReader);
...

And then the attributes will be accessible as so:

attributes.get("my attribute name");

share|improve this answer

If all you need is just one attribute the suggestion by vorrtex is actually pretty solid. To give you an example of just how simple it would be to handle have a look here:

<xml>Click on <user1>Johnni<user1> or <user2>Jenny<user2> to see...</<xml>

And in your custom TagHandler you don't use equals but indexOf

final static String USER = "user";
if(tag.indexOf(USER) == 0) {
    // Extract tag postfix.
    String postfix = tag.substring(USER.length());
    Log.d(TAG, "postfix: " + postfix);
}

And you can then pass the postfix value in your onClick view parameter as a tag to keep it generic.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.