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With a list in Python I can return a part of it using the following code:

foo = [1,2,3,4,5,6]
bar = [10,20,30,40,50,60]
half = len(foo) / 2
foobar = foo[:half] + bar[half:]

Since Ruby does everything in arrays I wonder if there is something similar to that.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 44 down vote accepted

Yes, Ruby has very similar array-slicing syntax to Python. Here is the ri documentation for the array index method:

--------------------------------------------------------------- Array#[]
     array[index]                -> obj      or nil
     array[start, length]        -> an_array or nil
     array[range]                -> an_array or nil
     array.slice(index)          -> obj      or nil
     array.slice(start, length)  -> an_array or nil
     array.slice(range)          -> an_array or nil
------------------------------------------------------------------------
     Element Reference---Returns the element at index, or returns a 
     subarray starting at start and continuing for length elements, or 
     returns a subarray specified by range. Negative indices count 
     backward from the end of the array (-1 is the last element). 
     Returns nil if the index (or starting index) are out of range.

        a = [ "a", "b", "c", "d", "e" ]
        a[2] +  a[0] + a[1]    #=> "cab"
        a[6]                   #=> nil
        a[1, 2]                #=> [ "b", "c" ]
        a[1..3]                #=> [ "b", "c", "d" ]
        a[4..7]                #=> [ "e" ]
        a[6..10]               #=> nil
        a[-3, 3]               #=> [ "c", "d", "e" ]
        # special cases
        a[5]                   #=> nil
        a[5, 1]                #=> []
        a[5..10]               #=> []
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why is a[5, 1] different from a[6, 1] ? –  dertoni Mar 1 '11 at 10:37
2  
@dertoni: stackoverflow.com/questions/3219229/… –  michelpm Dec 7 '11 at 23:22
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You can use slice() for this:

>> foo = [1,2,3,4,5,6]
=> [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]
>> bar = [10,20,30,40,50,60]
=> [10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60]
>> half = foo.length / 2
=> 3
>> foobar = foo.slice(0, half) + bar.slice(half, foo.length)
=> [1, 2, 3, 40, 50, 60]

By the way, to the best of my knowledge, Python "lists" are just efficiently implemented dynamically growing arrays. Insertion at the beginning is in O(n), insertion at the end is amortized O(1), random access is O(1).

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Do you mean to use the bar array in the second slice? –  Samuel Mar 29 '09 at 20:24
    
Yes, thanks. I fixed this. –  Manuel Mar 29 '09 at 20:28
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If you want to split/cut the array on an index i,

arr = arr.drop(i)

> arr = [1,2,3,4,5]
 => [1, 2, 3, 4, 5] 
> arr.drop(2)
 => [3, 4, 5] 
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you can also write something like this

   foo = [1,2,3,4,5,6]
   bar = [10,20,30,40,50,60]
   half = foo.length / 2
   foobar = (foo.first half) + (bar.last half)

=> [1, 2, 3, 40, 50, 60]
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1  
You loose the middle object in case the arrays have an odd size. –  Michael Kohl Mar 27 '11 at 18:51
    
my only point was to show that there is possible to slice array calling first and last methods –  shabunc Mar 27 '11 at 18:57
1  
The potentially unsafe code reference by @michael-kohl is important. Please revise so someone doesn't use this code as is and miss a 0.5 occurrence edge-case. -1 –  ghayes Nov 28 '12 at 0:15
1  
Array#first is also not a part of the Array class in ruby. It's added by ActiveSupport, i.e. Rails. Use Array#take instead. –  Jonathan Abrams Feb 5 at 18:51
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