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I'm using ASP.NET MVC 3 and Entity Framework 4.1 Code First.

Let's say I have a User entity :

public class User
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Email { get; set; }
    public string Password { get; set; }        
}

When editing it in my UserController I want to add a PasswordConfirmation field and verify that PasswordConfirmation == Password

1. By composition

My first try was :

public class EditUserModel
{
    [Required]
    public User User { get; set; }

    [Compare("User.Password", ErrorMessage = "Passwords don't match.")]
    public string PasswordConfirmation { get; set; }
}

In this case the client side validation works but (Edit: client side validation working was a coincidence.) doesn't work and the server side validation fails with the following message : Could not find a property named User.Password

Edit: I think the best solution, in this case, would be to create a custom CompareAttribute

Implementing IValidatableObject

public class EditUserModel : IValidatableObject
{
    [Required]
    public User User { get; set; }
    public string PasswordConfirmation { get; set; }

    public IEnumerable<ValidationResult> Validate(ValidationContext validationContext)
    {
        if(this.PasswordConfirmation != this.User.Password)
            return new[] { new ValidationResult("Passwords don't match", new[] { "PasswordConfirmation " }) };

        return new ValidationResult[0];
    }
}

In this case the server side validation works but the client side validation doesn't work anymore. Implementing IClientValidatable seems a bit too complicated and I prefer not having client side validation in this case.

2. By inheritance

public class EditUserModel : User
{
    [Compare("Password", ErrorMessage = "Passwords don't match.")]
    public string PasswordConfirmation  { get; set; }
}

When trying to directly save EditUserModel using EF it doesn't work, I get some some error message about the EditUserModel metadata so I'm using AutoMapper to convert from User to EditUserModel and backwards. This solution works but it more complex because I have to convert from the model to the view model and backwards.

3. By duplication

(Suggested by Malte Clasen)

The view model would have all the properties of the model plus additional ones. AutoMapper can be used to convert from one to another.

public class EditUserModel {    
  public string Name { get; set; }    
  public string Email { get; set; }    
  public string Password { get; set; }   
  [Compare("Password", ErrorMessage = "Passwords don't match.")]     
  public string ConfirmPassword { get; set; }        
}

This is the solution I like the least because of code duplication (DRY)

Questions

What are the pros and cons of inheritance, composition and duplication in this case ?

Is there a simple way to have both client side and server side validation without having to convert the model to the view model and backwards ?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Having struggled with this question before, I have in various instances gone with all three. In general, most of the opinions I've seen favor duplication in an MVC project, with a ViewModel constructed specifically for each view. In this manner the convention you'd use is something like UserDetailsViewModel and UserCreateViewModel. As you said, at that point AutoMapper or some other auto mapping tool would be used to convert from your domain objects to these flat ViewModels.

While I, too, don't like repeating code, I also don't like polluting my domain objects with validation or other view-specific attributes. Another advantage, though admittedly one almost nobody would ever have to contend with (regardless of what all the pros say), is that you can manipulate your domain objects in some ways without necessarily manipulating your ViewModels. I mention that because it's commonly cited, not because it carries much weight for me.

Lastly, using a truly flat ViewModel makes for cleaner markup. When I've used composition, I've often made errors creating HTML elements with names that are something like User.Address.Street. A flat ViewModel reduces at least my likelihood of doing that (I know, I could always use HtmlHelper routines to create elements, but that's not always feasible).

My recent projects have also pretty much required separate ViewModels these days anyway. They've all been NHibernate-based, and the use of proxies on NHibernate objects makes it not possible to use them directly for views.

Update - here's a good article I've referred to in the past: http://geekswithblogs.net/michelotti/archive/2009/10/25/asp.net-mvc-view-model-patterns.aspx

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yes, one view model per view (in most cases), and automapper to avoid passing back and forth stuff, the thing with the other approaches is that you end up mixing concerns, and there is data that is not always required in the view (then you have to exclude fields, etc), or multiple objects required in the view, a view model can flatten all of that and have that responsiblity plus the data annotations stuff –  BlackTigerX Aug 5 '11 at 14:54
    
Read this article too, I don't follow it 100%, but very close lostechies.com/jimmybogard/2009/06/30/how-we-do-mvc-view-models –  BlackTigerX Aug 5 '11 at 15:29
    
Yup, that's another article I referenced to get to where I'm at now. I'm not 100% happy, though. In particular the overlap between my Edit and Create ViewModels is annoying. That's duplication I can't argue away as easily. –  Josh Aug 5 '11 at 15:53
3  
Also, do not confuse duplication with a violation of DRY. Just because you have properties of the same name on two entities does not mean you're repeating yourself. Syntactically, yes, but conceptually, your viewmodel and your entity are completely different -- especially when you're beyond a simple CRUD application. –  Facio Ratio Oct 11 '12 at 15:24

You could also consider independent classes for domain and view models, in this case for example

public class EditUserModel {    
  public string Name { get; set; }    
  public string Email { get; set; }    
  public string Password { get; set; }        
  public string ConfirmPassword { get; set; }        
}

if the Id is stored in the url. If you want to avoid the manual copy between the instances of User and EditorUserModel, AutoMapper can help you. This way you can easily decouple the password string in your view model from the password hash in your domain model.

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I personally prefer this technique; having a set of 'ViewModel' classes that are specifically for views & client validation. This keeps my model completely separate from any UI concerns. I certainly couldn't live with a 'ConfirmPassword' property existing on my model. –  David Masters Aug 5 '11 at 12:47
    
This has the added benefit that it allows you to add properties to the Model without worrying about them being updated inadvertently, since the ViewModel doesn't contain those properties unless you explicitly add them. In other words, only those items in the ViewModel can be updated to the Model. –  saluce Apr 8 '14 at 20:19

I have trying to work this out and I found a solution that does not involve duplicating code. It's kind of workaround but, in my opinion, it's better than the other proposed solutions.

You have the User Model with all the validation:

public class UserModel
{
    [Required]
    public int Id { get; set; }
    [Required]
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Email { get; set; }
    public string Password { get; set; }        
}

You compose the previous model with a new model

public class EditUserModel
{
    public UserModel User { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public string PasswordConfirmation { get; set; }
}

The trick is in the action, you could receive more than one model:

[HtttPost]
public ActionResult UpdateInformation(UserModel user, EditUserModel editUserModel) {
    if (ModelState.IsValid) {
         // copy the inner model to the outer model, workaround here:
         editUserModel.User = user
         // do whatever you want with editUserModel, it has all the needed information
    }
}

In this way the validation works as expected.

Hope this helps.

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1  
In this case how to compare to properties ? e.g. in your case compare Password and PasswordConfirmation with data annotation as OP has asked ? –  Ani Shroff Nov 9 '13 at 17:17

I would favour composition over inheritance.

In case of your user password it looks like you're actually storing the password in Users table in clear text, which is VERY, VERY BAD.

You should store only a salted hash, and your EditUserModel should have two string properties for password and password confirmation, which are NOT the fields in your table.

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9  
I know about storing passwords in clear text, that's not the point –  Catalin DICU Aug 5 '11 at 9:58
1  
Than my first sentence is still valid ;-) Composition gives you more flexibility than inheritance (especially single inheritance in C#) –  Jakub Konecki Aug 5 '11 at 9:59
    
It's my preferred solution too and I'm OK to trading client side validation for it. :) –  Catalin DICU Aug 5 '11 at 10:11
    
You don't necessarily have to trade client-side validation. Ie. two properties on view model I've suggested will work with client-side validation. You might want to use AutoMapper for easy copying data between business objects and view models. –  Jakub Konecki Aug 5 '11 at 10:14

I don't use Entity Models too much, I prefer LINQ - SQL models so this may be incorrect:

Why not use a meta-data class which is applied to the Entity? With LINQ - SQL the metadata assigned is taken into consideration for both client-side as well as server-side validation.

From what I understand application of a [MetaDataType] attribute is similar to inheritance only it works without implementing a new class (model) for alterations to the basic entity.

Also, another option you might want to try is creating a custom attribute - I did this once for a similar purpose. Essentially a flag which indicated the persistence of a member.

So i would have an entity defined as follows:

public class User
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Email { get; set; }
    public string Password { get; set; }     

    [DoNotPersist]   
    public string ConfirmPassword {get; set;}

}

Also, I don't know what you are doing to store data but I had hooked an override into the OnInserting , OnEditing, OnDeleting functions for my DataContext which basically removed any members having my custom attribute.

I like this method simple because we use a lot of temporary, rather algorithmic data for each model (building good UI's for Business Intelligence) which is not saved in the database but is used everywhere inside model functions, controllers, etc - so we use dependency injection in all model repositories and controllers and so we have all these extra data points for each table to play with.

Hope that helps!

PS:- Composition vs Inheritance - it really depends on the target user of the application. If it is for an intranet app where security is less of an issue and the user / browser environment is controlled then just use client side validation, ie: composition.

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