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Let's say I have this SQL:

SELECT p.ParentId, COUNT(c.ChildId)
FROM ParentTable p
  LEFT OUTER JOIN ChildTable c ON p.ParentId = c.ChildParentId
GROUP BY p.ParentId

How can I translate this into LINQ to SQL? I got stuck at the COUNT(c.ChildId), the generated SQL always seems to output COUNT(*). Here's what I got so far:

from p in context.ParentTable
join c in context.ChildTable on p.ParentId equals c.ChildParentId into j1
from j2 in j1.DefaultIfEmpty()
group j2 by p.ParentId into grouped
select new { ParentId = grouped.Key, Count = grouped.Count() }

Thank you!

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4 Answers 4

up vote 143 down vote accepted
from p in context.ParentTable
join c in context.ChildTable on p.ParentId equals c.ChildParentId into j1
from j2 in j1.DefaultIfEmpty()
group j2 by p.ParentId into grouped
select new { ParentId = grouped.Key, Count = grouped.Count(t=>t.ChildId != null) }
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OK, that works, but why? How do you think through it? How does not counting null values give us the same as COUNT(c.ChildId)? Thanks. –  pbz Mar 29 '09 at 22:36
2  
This is how SQL works. COUNT(fieldname) will count the rows in that field that are not null. Maybe I don't get your question, please clarify if that's the case. –  Mehrdad Afshari Mar 29 '09 at 22:38
    
I guess I always thought about it in terms of counting rows, but you are correct, only the non-null values are counted. Thanks. –  pbz Mar 29 '09 at 22:46
1  
.Count() will generate COUNT(*) which will count all the rows in that group, by the way. –  Mehrdad Afshari Mar 29 '09 at 22:47
    
I've been trying to get this work for hours, thank you soo much! :-) –  Ian Devlin Sep 15 '09 at 18:19

Consider using a subquery:

from p in context.ParentTable 
let cCount =
(
  from c in context.ChildTable
  where p.ParentId == c.ChildParentId
  select c
).Count()
select new { ParentId = p.Key, Count = cCount } ;

If the query types are connected by an association, this simplifies to:

from p in context.ParentTable 
let cCount = p.Children.Count()
select new { ParentId = p.Key, Count = cCount } ;
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If I remember correctly (it's been a while), that query was a simplified version of a large one. If all I needed was the key and count your solution would've been cleaner / better. –  pbz Jul 9 '10 at 18:53
1  
Your comment doesn't make sense in context with original question and upvoted answers. Additionally - if you want more than the key, you have the whole parent row to draw from. –  David B Jul 9 '10 at 21:57
    
this help me with a somewhat related problem, thanks –  Merritt May 10 '11 at 17:06
    
this helped me...it solved my problem. thanks @DavidB –  devson Feb 3 '12 at 9:33
    
@DavidB I like your solution better! –  Tomas Feb 6 '12 at 11:51
 (from p in context.ParentTable     
  join c in context.ChildTable 
    on p.ParentId equals c.ChildParentId into j1 
  from j2 in j1.DefaultIfEmpty() 
     select new { 
          ParentId = p.ParentId,
         ChildId = j2==null? 0 : 1 
      })
   .GroupBy(o=>o.ParentId) 
   .Select(o=>new { ParentId = o.key, Count = o.Sum(p=>p.ChildId) })
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LATE ANSWER:

You shouldn't need the left join at all if all you're doing is Count(). Note that join...into is actually translated to GroupJoin which returns groupings like new{parent,IEnumerable<child>} so you just need to call Count() on the group:

from p in context.ParentTable
join c in context.ChildTable on p.ParentId equals c.ChildParentId into g
select new { ParentId = p.Id, Count = g.Count() }
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