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I use this style when I get data from database

public class User
{
    public static List<User> GetUsers()
    {
        List<User> users = new Users();
        using ( var context = new DataContext())
        {
            users = context.Users.ToList();
        }

        return users;
    }
}

After I get data from database then I want to Filter user likes this

List<User> userResultList = User.GetUsers();   
userResultList.Where(u => u.IsActive == true);

But cannot filter and I get this error

The ObjectContext instance has been disposed and can no longer be used for operations that require a connection.

My Question : Is possible way to filter result object after DataContext disposed?

Thank you very much for every support.

Update !!!

I think it possible if I create new DbContext in method scope that I want to retrieve data

Is it good enough approach?

Example

public class User
    {
        public static List<User> GetUsers()
        {
            List<User> users = new Users();

            var context = new DataContext())
            users = context.Users.ToList();

            return users;
        }
    }
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1  
What is your IsActive property implementation? Is it persisted property or some computed property? –  Ladislav Mrnka Aug 5 '11 at 11:43
    
I don't see a problem in the code you posted. You needed the DataContext for the retrieval part (in your case). Using linq you can filter the collection. So to answer your question, you can filter the list after the DataContext was disposed. Maybe the error has a different cause. –  Arabela Paslaru Aug 5 '11 at 12:55
    
Is the list being serialized higher in the execution stack? Through WCF service, or similar? –  Eugene S. Aug 5 '11 at 13:43
1  
no, it's not good approach.wrap context in a using statement is good. Plus, if you are doing MVC application, you probably don't want to create a new context in each action method. –  J.W. Aug 5 '11 at 14:05
1  
What process actually triggers enumeration of userResultList.Where(u => u.IsActive == true) (which is just an enumerable that in itself does nothing)? It looks like some lazy load is triggered there. –  Gert Arnold Aug 5 '11 at 14:12

2 Answers 2

I wonder if you clone the list will get around the error?

User[] L = new User[users.Count];
users.CopyTo(L);

Speculation:

What you had looks like it should work on the surface.

I wonder if the thing that is returned by ToList() is something that inherits from list, and retains some hidden context awareness inside.

I can't test this idea right now. Something to think about for later though.

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As you confirm that lazy load is triggered after you dispose the DataContext the only solution would be to ensure that you fetch all data that is required for whatever you want to do afterwards. Tracking an object after disposal of a DataContext is common practise, but for clarity, I would open an other issue for that (or look for the answer first, shouldn't be too hard to find).

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