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Is the following pseudocode thread-safe ?

IList<T> dataList = SomeNhibernateRepository.GetData();

Parallel.For(..i..)
{
    foreach(var item in dataList)
    {
       DoSomething(item);
    }
}

The list never gets changed, it's only iterated and read in parallel. No writing to fields or something like that whatsoever.

Thanks.

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4 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Yes, List<T> is fine to read from multiple threads concurrently, so long as nothing's writing.

From the documentation:

A List<T> can support multiple readers concurrently, as long as the collection is not modified.

EDIT: Note that your code doesn't necessarily use List<T> - just an IList<T>. Do you know the type returned by GetData()? If you're in control of GetData() you probably want to document that the list returned by it is thread-safe for reading, if it's actually returning a List<T>.

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It's fully thread-safe as long as DoSomething(item) doesn't modify dataList. Since you said it doesn't, then yes, that is thread-safe.

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to make sure no one is gonna change yuor list you could access it through an IEnumerable

IEnumerable<T> dataList = SomeNhibernateRepository.GetData();

Parallel.For(..i..)
{
    foreach(var item in dataList)
    {
       DoSomething(item);
    }
}
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That could still be cast back to a List<T>. You could return List<T>.AsReadOnly(), but even so the original list is accessible with reflection. –  Janiels Aug 5 '11 at 12:01
    
if you cast back the List<T> you still can't modify the original list If you are considering the reflection you could circumvent runtime checks as well . how can you make a field private? you may anwer with the private keywork. I may answer you with the reflection I can access it. –  Massimiliano Peluso Aug 5 '11 at 12:15
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If whay you say is correct then I would say so. But what you say or think may not what happen in reality. How can you say in code what you have said. How to enforce the constraint that List is never modified?

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1  
That's relatively easy: make it a private member in a class which only performs read access to the list, possibly exposing the values via other members. The class needs to be kept under control, but it's a single piece of code to look at. –  Jon Skeet Aug 5 '11 at 11:58
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