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Let's say users have 1 - n accounts in a system. When they query the database, they may choose to select from m acounts, with m between 1 and n. Typically the SQL generated to fetch their data is something like

SELECT ... FROM ... WHERE account_id IN (?, ?, ..., ?)

So depending on the number of accounts a user has, this will cause a new hard-parse in Oracle, and a new execution plan, etc. Now there are a lot of queries like that and hence, a lot of hard-parses, and maybe the cursor/plan cache will be full quite early, resulting in even more hard-parses.

Instead, I could also write something like this

-- use any of these
CREATE TYPE numbers AS VARRAY(1000) of NUMBER(38);
CREATE TYPE numbers AS TABLE OF NUMBER(38);

SELECT ... FROM ... WHERE account_id IN (
  SELECT column_value FROM TABLE(?)
)

-- or

SELECT ... FROM ... JOIN (
  SELECT column_value FROM TABLE(?)
) ON column_value = account_id

And use JDBC to bind a java.sql.Array (i.e. an oracle.sql.ARRAY) to the single bind variable. Clearly, this will result in less hard-parses and less cursors in the cache for functionally equivalent queries. But is there anything like general a performance-drawback, or any other issues that I might run into?

E.g: Does bind variable peeking work in a similar fashion for varrays or nested tables? Because the amount of data associated with every account may differ greatly.

I'm using Oracle 11g in this case, but I think the question is interesting for any Oracle version.

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2  
Not an answer to your question, but maybe an alternative: Did you try using a constant amount of placeholders? e.g. always a multiple of five? You can null the placeholders you don't need. –  ZeissS Aug 5 '11 at 12:13
    
That's a nice alternative. The optimiser might even remove the null-bound variables from the execution plan, if it can peek at it... –  Lukas Eder Aug 5 '11 at 12:20
1  
Regarding the NULL workaround, be cautious of logical oddities. For example, 1 IN (1,NULL) produces the same result as 1 IN (1); but 1 NOT IN (0,NULL) is not the same as 1 NOT IN (0). –  Dave Costa Aug 5 '11 at 12:57
    
@Dave, thanks for the hint, you're right. But this is only about the IN (...) operator. We're hardly using the NOT IN (...) operator... –  Lukas Eder Aug 5 '11 at 13:03
    
@ZeissS, @Dave: Instead of binding NULL to be on the safe side with NOT IN operations, you could also repeat the last bind value, e.g. account_id IN (1, 2, 3, 3, 3). Maybe Oracle is smart enough to reduce the set first, before checking against it. –  Lukas Eder Aug 5 '11 at 13:18

4 Answers 4

I suggest you try a plain old join like in

SELECT Col1, Col2
FROM   ACCOUNTS ACCT
       TABLE TAB,
WHERE  ACCT.User = :ParamUser
AND    TAB.account_id = ACCT.account_id;

An alternative could be a table subquery

SELECT Col1, Col2
FROM   (
       SELECT account_id
       FROM   ACCOUNTS
       WHERE  User = :ParamUser
       ) ACCT,
       TABLE TAB
WHERE  TAB.account_id = ACCT.account_id;

or a where subquery

SELECT Col1, Col2
FROM   TABLE TAB
WHERE  TAB.account_id IN 
       (
       SELECT account_id 
       FROM   ACCOUNTS
       WHERE  User = :ParamUser
       );

The first one should be better for perfomance, but you better check them all with explain plan.

share|improve this answer
    
Maybe I overly simplified the question. But a user has n accounts but he may choose only m accounts for any query, with m between 1 and n. Otherwise, of course, we'd use the join you suggested. –  Lukas Eder Aug 5 '11 at 13:05
    
What about inserting user choices in a GLOBAL TEMPORARY TABLE and then join to that table? GLOBAL TEMP tables are only seen within the session. –  Miguel Veloso Aug 5 '11 at 13:13
    
That could work. I feel the architecture implications might turn out to be a bit too big, though. But it could be an option –  Lukas Eder Aug 5 '11 at 13:21
    
Another option, not too elegant, but could work without affecting architecture: just create a string of delimited user choices and check for INSTR(UserChoices, '|' || Column || '|') > 0. It will cause a full table scan on the table, that would be a problem if it's a large table, so it should work better with one of the subquery options. –  Miguel Veloso Aug 5 '11 at 13:34
    
Haha, Miguel. No, the accounts table has about 5M records and transactions tables that are joined to accounts have 2G records. There are several other large tables, so we do want to use the indexes, believe me :-) But your creativity deserves upvoting –  Lukas Eder Aug 5 '11 at 13:38

Looking at V$SQL_BIND_CAPTURE in a 10g database, I have a few rows where the datatype is VARRAY or NESTED_TABLE; the actual bind values were not captured. In an 11g database, there is just one such row, but it also shows that the bind value is not captured. So I suspect that bind value peeking essentially does not happen for user-defined types.

In my experience, the main problem you run into using nested tables or varrays in this way is that the optimizer does not have a good estimate of the cardinality, which could lead it to generate bad plans. But, there is an (undocumented?) CARDINALITY hint that might be helpful. The problem with that is, if you calculate the actual cardinality of the nested table and include that in the query, you're back to having multiple distinct query texts. Perhaps if you expect that most or all users will have at most 10 accounts, using the hint to indicate that as the cardinality would be helpful. Of course, I'd try it without the hint first, you may not have an issue here at all.

(I also think that perhaps Miguel's answer is the right way to go.)

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Thanks for those insights. I was afraid that UDT's would not be peeked at. The cardinality hint with a default of 10 might work, but then again, the behaviour of that in general is too unpredictable. Miguel's answer, unfortunately, is not applicable. I have corrected my original question. The user can select any number of accounts between 1 and n... But ZeissS's comment is an interesting one... –  Lukas Eder Aug 5 '11 at 13:17

This binding a variable number of items into an in list problem seems to come up a lot in various form. One option is to concatenate the IDs into a comma separated string and bind that, and then use a bit of a trick to split it into a table you can join against, eg:

with bound_inlist
  as
  (
  select
    substr(txt,
           instr (txt, ',', 1, level  ) + 1,
           instr (txt, ',', 1, level+1) - instr (txt, ',', 1, level) -1 )
           as token
    from (select ','||:txt||',' txt from dual)
  connect by level <= length(:txt)-length(replace(:txt,',',''))+1
  )
  select *
from bound_inlist a, actual_table b
where a.token = b.token

Bind variable peaking is going to be a problem though.

Does the query plan actually change for larger number of accounts, ie would it be more efficient to move from index to full table scan in some cases, or is it borderline? As someone else suggested, you could use the CARDINALITY hint to indicate how many IDs are being bound, the following test case proves this actually works:

create table actual_table (id integer, padding varchar2(100));

create unique index actual_table_idx on actual_table(id);

insert into actual_table
select level, 'this is just some padding for '||level
from dual connect by level <= 1000;

explain plan for
with bound_inlist
  as
  (
  select /*+ CARDINALITY(10) */
    substr(txt,
           instr (txt, ',', 1, level  ) + 1,
           instr (txt, ',', 1, level+1) - instr (txt, ',', 1, level) -1 )
           as token
    from (select ','||:txt||',' txt from dual)
  connect by level <= length(:txt)-length(replace(:txt,',',''))+1
  )
  select *
from bound_inlist a, actual_table b
where a.token = b.id;

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------                                                                                                                                                                                                         
| Id  | Operation                       | Name             | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |                                                                                                                                                                                                         
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------                                                                                                                                                                                                         
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT                |                  |    10 |   840 |     2   (0)| 00:00:01 |                                                                                                                                                                                                         
|   1 |  NESTED LOOPS                   |                  |       |       |            |          |                                                                                                                                                                                                         
|   2 |   NESTED LOOPS                  |                  |    10 |   840 |     2   (0)| 00:00:01 |                                                                                                                                                                                                         
|   3 |    VIEW                         |                  |    10 |   190 |     2   (0)| 00:00:01 |                                                                                                                                                                                                         
|*  4 |     CONNECT BY WITHOUT FILTERING|                  |       |       |            |          |                                                                                                                                                                                                         
|   5 |      FAST DUAL                  |                  |     1 |       |     2   (0)| 00:00:01 |                                                                                                                                                                                                         
|*  6 |    INDEX UNIQUE SCAN            | ACTUAL_TABLE_IDX |     1 |       |     0   (0)| 00:00:01 |                                                                                                                                                                                                         
|   7 |   TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID   | ACTUAL_TABLE     |     1 |    65 |     0   (0)| 00:00:01 |                                                                                                                                                                                                         
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 
share|improve this answer
    
That's quite a creative solution. I'm surprised you'd get such a good execution plan. Clearly worth investigating. With 5M accounts and 2G transactions in the system, full scans are never better than index scans, even if some accounts only have a few dozen transactions and others may have thousands... Thanks for the nice examples! –  Lukas Eder Aug 6 '11 at 9:05

Another option is to always use n bind variables in every query. Use null for m+1 to n.

Oracle ignores repeated items in the expression_list. Your queries will perform the same way and there will be fewer hard parses. But there will be extra overhead to bind all the variables and transfer the data. Unfortunately I have no idea what the overall affect on performance would be, you'd have to test it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Yes, that's more or less what ZeissS suggested. From experience, bind time is negligible (especially for null values), compared to the execution of the actual query... –  Lukas Eder Aug 6 '11 at 7:14
    
Oops, sorry @ZeissS, I didn't see your comment. –  Jon Heller Aug 6 '11 at 17:15

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