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I know this is heresy, but I tried to translate the examples from http://www.haskell.org/haskellwiki/Memoization to Java. So far I have:

public abstract class F<A,B> {
    public abstract B f(A a);
}

...
public static <A, B> F<A, B> memoize(final F<A, B> fn) {
  return new F<A, B>() {

    private final Map<A, B> map = new HashMap<A, B>();

    public B f(A a) {
      B b = map.get(a);
        if (b == null) {
          b = fn.f(a);
          map.put(a, b);
        }
      return b;
    }
  };
}

//usage:
private class Cell<X> {
    public X value = null;
}

...
final Cell<F<Integer, BigInteger>> fibCell = new Cell<F<Integer, BigInteger>>();
fibCell.value = memoize(new F<Integer, BigInteger>() {
  public BigInteger f(Integer a) {
     return a <= 1 ? BigInteger.valueOf(a) : fibCell.value.f(a - 1).add(fibCell.value.f(a - 2));
  }
});
System.out.println(fibCell.value.f(1000));

That works fine. Now I tried to implement the memoFix combinator defined as

memoFix :: ((a -> b) -> (a -> b)) -> a -> b
memoFix f =
   let mf = memoize (f mf) in mf

But I got stuck. Does this even make sense in Java, especially concerning its inherent lack of lazyness?

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1  
I find it interesting using functional techniques in oo and ob languages. –  Mike Miller Aug 5 '11 at 13:46
    
@Mike: What's ob? –  missingfaktor Aug 5 '11 at 18:25
    
@missingfaktor: Object-based, presumably. –  li.davidm Aug 6 '11 at 1:51
1  
You should know that functionaljava.org exists. I haven't used it, and I don't know if it has laziness built-in in some way, but you'd probably find it interesting anyway. –  MatrixFrog Aug 8 '11 at 5:46
    
I know it, but didn't find any memoization stuff (of course I could have overlooked something). Thanks anyway. –  Landei Aug 8 '11 at 6:39

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Okay, this has convinced me that functional programming is ususally a bad idea with Java. Lack of laziness can be worked around using a reference object (which essentially implements laziness). Here's a solution:

public static class FunctionRef<A, B> {
    private F<A, B> func;
    public void set(F<A, B> f) { func = f; }
    public F<A, B> get() { return func; }
}

public static class Pair<A, B> {
    public final A first; public final B second;
    public Pair(A a, B b) {
        this.first = a; this.second = b;
    }
}

public static <A, B> F<A, B> memoFix(final F<Pair<FunctionRef<A, B>, A>, B> func) {
    final FunctionRef<A, B> y = new FunctionRef<A, B>();
    y.set(
        memoize(new F<A, B>() {
            @Override
            public B f(A a) {
                return func.f(new Pair<FunctionRef<A, B>, A>(y, a));
            }
        })
    );
    return y.get();
}


//Test that it works
public static void main(String[] args) {
    F<Pair<FunctionRef<Integer, Integer>,Integer>, Integer> fib = new F<Pair<FunctionRef<Integer, Integer>,Integer>, Integer>() {
        @Override
        public Integer f(Pair<FunctionRef<Integer, Integer>, Integer> a) {
            int value = a.second;
            System.out.println("computing fib of " + value);
            if (value == 0) return 0;
            if (value == 1) return 1;
            return a.first.get().f(value - 2) + a.first.get().f(value - 1);
        }
    };

    F<Integer, Integer> memoized = memoFix(fib);
    System.out.println(memoized.f(10));
}

Note that when the program is run, it only outputs "computing fib of" once for each value!

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The Guava library actually implements something similar with its MapMaker:

final Map<Integer, String> memoizingMap = new MapMaker().makeComputingMap(
    new Function<Integer, String>() {
        @Override
        public String apply(final Integer input) {
            System.out.println("Calculating ...");
            return Integer.toHexString(input.intValue());
        }
    });
System.out.println(memoizingMap.get(1));
System.out.println(memoizingMap.get(100));
System.out.println(memoizingMap.get(100000));
System.out.println("The following should not calculate:");
System.out.println(memoizingMap.get(1));

Output:

Calculating ...
1
Calculating ...
64
Calculating ...
186a0
The following should not calculate:
1

The nice thing is that you can fine-tune the generated map for different aspects as expiration, concurrency level etc.

share|improve this answer

The memoFix solution by Joe K was really impressive :-)

For practical purposes, this seems to be the most elegant solution for recursive (and non-recursive) functions, as it avoids the need for some reference variable:

import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Map;

public abstract class MemoF<A,B> extends F<A,B> {

    private final Map<A, B> map = new HashMap<A, B>();

    @Override
    public B f(A a) {
                B b = map.get(a);
                if (b == null) {
                    b = func(a);
                    map.put(a, b);
                }
                return b;
    }

    public abstract B func(A a);
}

Now you have to implement func as usual, except that you never call it recursively, but call f instead:

F<Integer, BigInteger> memoFib = new MemoF<Integer, BigInteger>(){
    public BigInteger func(Integer a) {
        return a <= 1 ? BigInteger.valueOf(a) : f(a - 1).add(f(a - 2));
    }
};

System.out.println(memoFib.f(100));
//--> 354224848179261915075
share|improve this answer

Why are you stuck? It looks like you're done.

You've successfully memoized calls to a function using a Map.

share|improve this answer
    
For non-recursive functions memoize is fine. But in case of recursive functions you have some difficulties, e.g. the recursive function needs to "know" that it is memoized, and some wrapper like Cell is needed. The memoFix combinator looks like it could simplify that, and you had a choice if you want to run the function memoized or not. –  Landei Aug 5 '11 at 14:13
    
Thanks @Landei, you're right, my answer completely missed the point. –  Atreys Aug 5 '11 at 14:40

Here is a snippet from my recent solution for the exact same problem:

private final static class MutableFunction<A, B> implements Function<A, B> {
    public Function<A, B> f;

    @Override
    public B apply(A argument) {
        return f.apply(argument);
    }
}

/**
* Computes the fixed point of function f.
* Only terminates successfully if f is non-strict (that is returns without calling its argument).
*/
public static <A, B, R extends Function<A,B>> R fix(final Function<? super Function<A, B>, ? extends R> f) {
    MutableFunction<A, B> mutable = new MutableFunction<A, B>();
    R result = f.apply(mutable);
    mutable.f = result;
    return result;
}

Memofix of f is just a fix(composition(memo, f)) then!

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