Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a class that instanciate another class and works as a delegate for that second class. That second class is "free" and is not retained by the first one.

That second class sends async HTTP requests and listen for their response.
When a response is received, it is parsed, and the result is repackaged and sent to one of the delegate methods. Once the delegate is called, the second class instance release itself. End of the show.

To be sure to get the server answer, when the first class enters in dealloc (for any reason), it changes the delegate property of the second one to route the answer to the applicationdelegate.

But... when changing that delegate attribute, I think there is a chance that the http answer that is async may collide with the dealloc process of the first class. So the first class would receive an answer while it is deallocating. In that case, the first class would receive an answer it cannot manage (may probably crash), and the second one would never see that the delegate had changed just after the call has been sent to the first class.

How would you concretly manage that problem ?

Here is a schema of the process :

  • AppDelegate creates A1, A2, A3.
  • each Ax create a B instance object (B1, B2, B3 that send HTTP requests), and each Ax is defined as a delegate of Bx
  • at this point, all A and B class instance may have their lives
  • if a Ax instance dies, the Bx class may send the answer to the appdelegate instead of the Ax instance
share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your have a problem if A is a delegate for B, but A is not allowed to retain B.

  1. B must known that is delegate (A) is still around, or set to nil when needed.
  2. A must know that B is still around, or else it can not safely remove itself as delegate.

So either remove the retain restriction and let A properly retain B.

Or go for a less coupled solution using notifications.

  1. Let B define a notification, and post on it.
  2. Let A register as a listener for the notification at creation, and deregister on deallocation.
share|improve this answer
    
The last solution is what I was planning to do. But... during the delay where B is notified that A is dying, it may send the answer to A. A and B must have dinstinct lives. One must be able to die before the other. But... when A dies, B must know it has to route the answer to app delegate (cannot use notification there because any instance of A could catch the notification in place of appdelegate when one of A instance dies). You could see also my EDIT. –  Oliver Aug 5 '11 at 13:30
1  
@Oliver - A notification dispatch is synchronious. Neither A nor B can die while the notification is in progress. The -[NSNotificationCenter post…] method will not even return until all registered observers has been called and done their work. –  PeyloW Aug 6 '11 at 12:39
add comment

To be sure to get the server answer, when the first class enters in dealloc (for any reason), it changes the delegate property of the second one to route the answer to the application delegate.

This doesn't sound like a sensible architecture to me. Juggling delegates in the way that you are shouldn't be necessary. Factor out the code that communicates to the server to its own class that persists for as long as you need it to. Don't spread your networking code throughout your app in objects that are coming and going all the time and don't treat your app delegate as a catch all whenever you need something available in more than one place.

share|improve this answer
    
You says "Don't spread your networking code throughout your app in objects that are coming and going all the time". That's right, and that's what I do, but only one bad call for just one dealloc may crash the app. That's not very user friendly, even if it should happen in a a statistic way. –  Oliver Aug 5 '11 at 14:22
    
I'm not sure what you are saying, can you rephrase? This has nothing to do with user-friendliness. –  Jim Aug 5 '11 at 14:23
    
I just mean, there's no need to be in a context where objects come and go all the time to crash. Just one call with a persistant object that realse once and with some no-luck and the app will crash too. This is the non userfriendly aspect I'm talking about (the crash) –  Oliver Aug 5 '11 at 16:19
    
Yes, crashes can happen in a multitude of different ways. So what? I don't see why you think that means you need to avoid a sensible architecture for your app. –  Jim Aug 6 '11 at 11:04
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.