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We have a task to change some strings in binary files to lowercase (from mixed/upper/whatever). The relevant strings are references to the other files (it's in connection with an upgrade where we are also moving from Windows to linux as a server environment, so the case suddenly matters). We have written a script which uses a perl loop to do this. We have a directory containing around 300 files (total size of the directory is around 150M) so it's some data but not huge amounts.

The following perl code takes about 6 minutes to do the job:

for file_ref in `ls -1F $forms6_convert_dir/ | grep -v "/" | sed 's/\(.*\)\..*/\1/'` 
do
    (( updated++ ))
    write_line "Converting case of string: $file_ref "
    perl -i -pe "s{(?i)$file_ref}{$file_ref}g" $forms6_convert_dir/* 
done

while the following perl code takes over 3 hours!

for file_ref in `ls -1F $forms6_convert_dir/ | grep -v "/" | sed 's/\(.*\)\..*/\1/'` 
do
    (( updated++ ))
    write_line "Converting case of string: $file_ref "
    perl -i -pe 's{(?i)$file_ref}{$file_ref}g' $forms6_convert_dir/* 
done

Can anyone explain why? Is it that the $file_ref is getting left as the string $file_ref instead of substituted with the value in the single quotes version? in which case, what is it replacing in this version? What we want is to replace all occurances of any filename with itself but in lowercase. If we run strings on the files before and after and search for the filenames then both appeared to have made the same changes. However, if we run diff on the files produced by the two loops (diff firstloop/file1 secondloop/file1) then it reports that they differ.

This is running from within a bash script on linux.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As the other answers said, the shell doesn't substitute variables inside single quotes, so the second version is executing the literal Perl statement s{(?i)$file_ref}{$file_ref}g for every line in every file.

As you said in a comment, if $ is the end-of-line metacharacter, $file_ref could never match anything. $ matches before the newline at end-of-line, so the next character would have to be a newline. Therefore, Perl doesn't interpret $ as the metacharacter; it interprets it as the beginning of a variable interpolation.

In Perl, the variable $file_ref is undef, which is treated as the empty string when interpolated. So you're really executing s{(?i)}{}g, which says to replace the empty string with the empty string, and do that for all occurrences in a case-insensitive manner. Well, there's an empty string between every pair of characters, plus one at the beginning and end of each line. Perl is finding each one and replacing it with the empty string. This is a no-op, but it's an expensive one, hence the 3-hour run time.

You must be mistaken about both versions making the same changes. As I just explained, the single-quoted version is just an expensive no-op; it doesn't make any changes at all to the file contents (it just makes a fresh copy of each file). The files you ran it on must have already been converted to lower case.

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The shell doesn't do variable substitution for single quoted strings. So, the second one is a different program.

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For the equivalent program with single quotes, make sure you export file_ref in the bash shell and use the expression s/(?i)$ENV{file_ref}/$ENV{file_ref}/g –  mob Aug 5 '11 at 15:53
    
Thanks. I'd come that far myself and I think that the double quotes version is the one I want (in that I want $file_ref to be replaced with the name of the file in the expression sent to perl). Part of my reason for asking the question was to double-check that I was right in which version I wanted, and part of it is to see if anyone can explain what the other version is doing and why it takes 30 times longer? If the $file_ref is left unsubsitiuted then how does the perl code match anything ($ being the end of a line, $anything should never match - or?). –  Adam Aug 8 '11 at 7:28
    
Both versions seem to replace the strings I want replaced, but one obviously does more than that (the resulting binary files differ according to diff, plus the 30x speed difference). Would really like to understand what the single quotes version is doing for substitutions –  Adam Aug 8 '11 at 7:29

With double quotes you are using the shell variable, with single quotes Perl is trying to use a variable of that name.

You might wish to consider writing the whole lot in either Perl or Bash to speed things up. Both languages can read files and do pattern matching. In Perl you can change to lower-case using the lc built-in function, and in Bash 4 you can use ${file,,}.

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Thanks. But what exactly is the single quotes version doing for substitutions (see my comment to the answer from yi_H)? –  Adam Aug 8 '11 at 7:29

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